7

Is it possible to write a script that does not proceed till a given line appears in a particular file?

For example I want to do something like this:

CANARY_LINE='Server started'
FILE='/var/logs/deployment.log'

echo 'Waiting for server to start'
.... watch $FILE for $CANARY_LINE ...
echo 'Server started'

Basically, a shell script that watches a file for line (or regex).

0
19
tail -f path_to_my_log_file.log | sed '/particular_line/ q'
3
  • The accepted answer is full of errors. This works wonderfully! Thanks Miloš! Jul 23 '20 at 23:47
  • note that this assumes the line will appear at the end of the file. that is usually the case, but not always. Nov 23 '20 at 2:44
  • I can't get this to work. tail continues execution after sed matches the regex. For me, this worked: superuser.com/questions/270529/…
    – Bizmarck
    Feb 23 at 21:18
2

You can use the q flag while parsing the input via sed. Then sed will interrupt tail as soon as Server started appears in /var/logs/deployment.log.

  tail -f /var/logs/deployment.log | sed '/Server started/ q'

Another way to do the same thing

  ( tail -f -n0 /var/logs/deployment.log & ) | grep -q "Server Started"

Previous answer (works but not as efficient than this one)

We have to be careful with loops.

For example if you want to check for a file to start an algorithm you've probably have to do something like that:

  FILE_TO_CHECK="/var/logs/deployment.log"
  LINE_TO_CONTAIN="Server started"
  SLEEP_TIME=10
  while [ $(cat FILE_TO_CHECK | grep "${LINE_TO_CONTAIN}") ]
  do
      sleep ${SLEEP_TIME}
  done

  # Start your algorithm here

But, in order to prevent an infinite loop you should add some bound:

  FILE_TO_CHECK="/var/logs/deployment.log"
  LINE_TO_CONTAIN="Server started"
  SLEEP_TIME=10
  COUNT=0
  MAX=10
  while [ $(cat FILE_TO_CHECK | grep "${LINE_TO_CONTAIN}") -a ${COUNT} -lt ${MAX} ]
  do
      sleep ${SLEEP_TIME}
      COUNT=$(($COUNT + 1))
  done

  if [ ! $(cat FILE_TO_CHECK | grep "${LINE_TO_CONTAIN}") ]
  then
    echo "Let's go, the file is containing what we want"
    # Start your algorithm here
  else
    echo "Timed out"
    exit 10
  fi
5
  • $(SLEEP_TIME) should be ${SLEEP_TIME}. There's no need to cat and pipe to grep. And uppercase variables are a bad habit.
    – Biffen
    Sep 21 '14 at 14:01
  • Thank you for this comment. I've already fixed the ${SLEEP_TIME}. About the naming convention, you are right using lower case seems to be a better idea in order to not override an environment variable.
    – Xavier S.
    Sep 21 '14 at 14:04
  • Isn't the logic in the while loop reversed? This will loop as long as grep finds something, and stop when it doesn't. How about something like until grep -q string file ; do sleep 1s ; done?
    – Biffen
    Sep 21 '14 at 14:12
  • grep returns 0 when it find a match, otherwise it returns 1. unixhelp.ed.ac.uk/CGI/man-cgi?grep
    – Xavier S.
    Sep 21 '14 at 19:22
  • Indeed, but putting it inside [ $() ] means the exit value of [ controls while, and it will simply test whether the output of the command ($()) is a non-empty string. You can try this with if [ $( true ) ] ; then echo true ; fi.
    – Biffen
    Sep 21 '14 at 19:38
0
CANARY_LINE='Server started'
FILE='/var/logs/deployment.log'

echo 'Waiting for server to start'
grep -q $CANARY_LINE <(tail -f $FILE)
echo 'Server started'

Source: adapted from How to wait for message to appear in log in shell

-1

Try this:

#!/bin/bash

canary_line='Server started'
file='/var/logs/deployment.log'

echo 'Waiting for server to start'

until grep -q "${canary_line}" "${file}"
do
  sleep 1s
done

echo 'Server started'

Adjust sleep's parameter to your taste.

If the line in the file needs to match exactly, i.e. the whole line, change grep's second parameter to "^${canary_line}$".

If the line contains any characters that grep thinks are special, you're going to have to solve that... somehow.

3
  • Could lead into an infinite loop
    – Xavier S.
    Sep 22 '14 at 17:59
  • 1
    Yes, it will run until the line appears in the file or until it is killed. I thought that's what OP wanted.
    – Biffen
    Sep 22 '14 at 19:05
  • ...an infinite loop, if you ask me, is one out of which the program cannot get itself. And this isn't one of those.
    – Biffen
    Sep 22 '14 at 19:13

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