1

I have the following code in C++:

(where arr.data[i-1] = 20; arr.date[i] = 30; payload = 50;)

if (i > 0 && arr.data[i-1] < payload < arr.data[i]) {
    cout << arr.data[i-1] << " < " << payload << " < " << arr.data[i] << "\n";
}

and I am getting the statement returned as

20 < 50 < 30

What am I doing incorrect?

7

You can't chain comparison operators like this:

if (i > 0 && arr.data[i-1] < payload < arr.data[i]) {

Instead, it should look like this:

if (i > 0 && arr.data[i-1] < payload && payload < arr.data[i]) {

Note that you do this in a few places in your code.

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  • Thank you! I was coming from other languages where you can string the comparisons together. – biw Sep 22 '14 at 0:19
  • 2
    @Ben: "a<b<c" will evaluate "a<b" alone first, and this results either in "true<c" or in "false<c". Neither of them is what you want. – deviantfan Sep 22 '14 at 0:20
  • 3
    There's only one language I've heard of that allows chaining comparisons like that. Most won't accept that – phuclv Sep 22 '14 at 2:10
1

Relational operators in C++ are left associative, so this is how the implementation reads it:

(i > 0 && arr.data[i-1] < payload) = TRUE = 1 (Boolean logic)

so, (1 < arr.data[i]) = TRUE

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