519

I have an IOS app with an Azure back-end, and would like to log certain events, like logins and which versions of the app users are running.

How can I return the version and build number using Swift?

3

34 Answers 34

597

EDIT

Updated for Swift 4.2

let appVersion = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String

EDIT

As pointed out by @azdev on the new version of Xcode you will get a compile error for trying my previous solution, to solve this just edit it as suggested to unwrap the bundle dictionary using a !

let nsObject: AnyObject? = Bundle.main.infoDictionary!["CFBundleShortVersionString"]

End Edit

Just use the same logic than in Objective-C but with some small changes

//First get the nsObject by defining as an optional anyObject
let nsObject: AnyObject? = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary["CFBundleShortVersionString"]

//Then just cast the object as a String, but be careful, you may want to double check for nil
let version = nsObject as! String
8
  • 20
    @andreas infoDictionary should be unwrapped using !. This is what I am using, placed into a Globals.swift file: let appVersion = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary!["CFBundleVersion"] as String
    – dvs
    Nov 10, 2014 at 16:25
  • 2
    I had to add one more "!" after "as". let appVersion = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary!["CFBundleVersion"] as! String
    – ITO Yosei
    May 3, 2015 at 0:01
  • 1
    I'm confused. This is just the build number, correct? What about the app version?
    – Slaknation
    Apr 8, 2019 at 21:21
  • 3
    You should avoid using a forced unwrap "!" as they will cause your app to crash whenever one of those values is nil
    – Julius
    Jul 12, 2019 at 15:46
  • 2
    @Julius I would argue that the app should crash when one of these values is null - what else are you going to do? Jul 9, 2020 at 6:45
311

Updated for Swift 3.0

The NS-prefixes are now gone in Swift 3.0 and several properties/methods have changed names to be more Swifty. Here's what this looks like now:

extension Bundle {
    var releaseVersionNumber: String? {
        return infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String
    }
    var buildVersionNumber: String? {
        return infoDictionary?["CFBundleVersion"] as? String
    }
}

Bundle.main.releaseVersionNumber
Bundle.main.buildVersionNumber

Old Updated Answer

I've been working with Frameworks a lot since my original answer, so I wanted to update my solution to something that is both simpler and much more useful in a multi-bundle environment:

extension NSBundle {

    var releaseVersionNumber: String? {
        return self.infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String
    }

    var buildVersionNumber: String? {
        return self.infoDictionary?["CFBundleVersion"] as? String
    }

}

Now this extension will be useful in apps to identify both the main bundle and any other included bundles (such as a shared framework for extension programming or third frameworks like AFNetworking), like so:

NSBundle.mainBundle().releaseVersionNumber
NSBundle.mainBundle().buildVersionNumber

// or...

NSBundle(URL: someURL)?.releaseVersionNumber
NSBundle(URL: someURL)?.buildVersionNumber

Original Answer

I wanted to improve on some of the answers already posted. I wrote a class extension that can be added to your tool chain to handle this in a more logical fashion.

extension NSBundle {

class var applicationVersionNumber: String {
    if let version = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"]

as? String { return version } return "Version Number Not Available" }

class var applicationBuildNumber: String {
    if let build = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary?["CFBundleVersion"] as? String {
        return build
    }
    return "Build Number Not Available"
}

}

So now you can access this easily by:

let versionNumber = NSBundle.applicationVersionNumber
1
  • CFBundleVersionKey no longer works in Swift 3, Xcode 8. Do you know the new key to use?
    – Crashalot
    Sep 25, 2016 at 6:10
307

I know this has already been answered but personally I think this is a little cleaner:

Swift 3.0:

 if let version = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String {
    self.labelVersion.text = version
}

Swift <2.3

if let version = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String {
    self.labelVersion.text = version
}

This way, the if let version takes care of the conditional processing (setting the label text in my case) and if infoDictionary or CFBundleShortVersionString are nil the optional unwrapping will cause the code to be skipped.

5
  • 7
    self.labelVersion.text is Optional type, so you can directly assign NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String
    – Jonauz
    Nov 25, 2015 at 0:43
  • 10
    Is there a reason the value would not be set? Agreed it's definitely more cautious with let, just wondering why it might be needed. Thanks!
    – Crashalot
    Feb 8, 2016 at 9:13
  • @Crashalot despite your name ;) you don't want your app to crash if, say, you make a typo, rather have the version number be "something went wrong". Jul 9, 2018 at 6:18
  • OP: you can replace the ? with ! and remove "as String". If it's nil, it's anyways not gonna crash Jul 9, 2018 at 6:22
  • This is the way.
    – progrmr
    Apr 30 at 0:34
100

I also know this has already been answered but I wrapped up the previous answers:

(*)Updated for extensions

extension Bundle {
    var releaseVersionNumber: String? {
        return infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String
    }
    var buildVersionNumber: String? {
        return infoDictionary?["CFBundleVersion"] as? String
    }
    var releaseVersionNumberPretty: String {
        return "v\(releaseVersionNumber ?? "1.0.0")"
    }
}

Usage:

someLabel.text = Bundle.main.releaseVersionNumberPretty

@Deprecated: Old answers

Swift 3.1:

class func getVersion() -> String {
    guard let version = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String else {
        return "no version info"
    }
    return version
}

For older versions:

class func getVersion() -> String {
    if let version = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String {
        return version
    }
    return "no version info"
}

So if you want to set label text or want to use somewhere else;

self.labelVersion.text = getVersion()
17
  • 1
    or: class func getVersion() -> String { return NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String ?? "no version info" }
    – tapmonkey
    Jun 17, 2015 at 10:39
  • I think copying other answers doesn't make sense. If your answer is not valid anymore then you always have the possibility to delete it and make room for the other answers :)
    – Carmen
    Apr 18, 2019 at 13:14
  • 1
    @carmen_munich Since you slander here I have to answer to you. First of all, this answer is posted March 2015 and your answer is posted Feb 2017. Therefore, your inspiration must come from the earlier answers. Secondly, I have not seen your answer at all, I updated my answer because I use it this way nowadays. Using an extension is not unique to someone in the iOS community I guess. Really, please try to be mature and respect other developers. I don't gain anything posting here. I'd like to help people that's it. Please try not to discourage people trying to help on SO.
    – Gunhan
    Apr 18, 2019 at 14:23
  • I heard a lot of feedback from newbies that they post an answer and want to see that someone clicks on "up" which is really nice to see and motivates people. But if someone copies answers in his outdated answer the one who made the effort to post it will not get that motivation that someone voted it up. So the newbies are really feel disappointment and have the feeling that they don't bring value to the community and stop posting. And don't get it wrong, I mean this in general. Hope you don't feel offended and understand now better why I made this suggestion.
    – Carmen
    Apr 23, 2019 at 13:54
  • @carmen_munich If you chronologically order the answers on this question you’ll notice that someone else already given the same answer as you did before you! So you’re blaming me something that you’d done yourself. Since I’ve history for this question, I shared my new usage preferences in an update. That’s all.
    – Gunhan
    Apr 23, 2019 at 16:22
39

For Swift 4.0

let version = Bundle.main.infoDictionary!["CFBundleShortVersionString"]!
let build = Bundle.main.infoDictionary!["CFBundleVersion"]!
36

I made an Extension on Bundle

extension Bundle {

    var appName: String {
        return infoDictionary?["CFBundleName"] as! String
    }

    var bundleId: String {
        return bundleIdentifier!
    }

    var versionNumber: String {
        return infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as! String 
    }

    var buildNumber: String {
        return infoDictionary?["CFBundleVersion"] as! String
    }

}

and then use it

versionLabel.text = "\(Bundle.main.appName) v \(Bundle.main.versionNumber) (Build \(Bundle.main.buildNumber))"
14
  • Actually its bit different. I use force unwrapping for example. You might think force unwrapping in general is bad, this one of the rare cases where it is okay. To explain it a bit more, these values should be in the dictionary otherwise something is really wrong with the project file. That's why this approach is using force unwrapping :-)
    – Carmen
    Apr 24, 2019 at 10:52
  • Renaming and force unwrapping is not a change to post as a new answer. Also, people might learn force unwrapping could be used anywhere when they see your answer. To the readers, don't assume the key is there, it's always better to handle optional unwrapping manually rather than force unwrapping.
    – Gunhan
    Apr 24, 2019 at 11:41
  • To be fair there are some rare cases where force unwrapping is okay. This one post just shows one case where it can be okay. If you want to know more about the force unwrapping cases there are some good explanations and tutorials from Paul Hudson. I can really recommend to all newbies www.hackingwithswift.com
    – Carmen
    Apr 24, 2019 at 11:46
  • It is a good recommendation for the newbies. Maybe you can also read more and learn more. Also you should improve your understanding about comments and what they imply. E.g. no one told you never/ever use force unwrapping. But for the info dict those keys can be removed and the force unwrap can result in a crash. It is safer to handle unwrapping here.
    – Gunhan
    Apr 24, 2019 at 12:01
  • Maybe you can explain in which case they can get removed and be nil? What I learned from the resource mentioned it's not in this partiuclare case. They should always be there unless the project file is broken, in that case the project would probably not compile anyway
    – Carmen
    Apr 24, 2019 at 12:07
35

Swift 5 as UIApplication extension

extension UIApplication {
    static var release: String {
        return Bundle.main.object(forInfoDictionaryKey: "CFBundleShortVersionString") as! String? ?? "x.x"
    }
    static var build: String {
        return Bundle.main.object(forInfoDictionaryKey: "CFBundleVersion") as! String? ?? "x"
    }
    static var version: String {
        return "\(release).\(build)"
    }
}

example use:

print("release: \(UIApplication.release)")
print("build: \(UIApplication.build)")
print("version: \(UIApplication.version)")
26

2021, Swift 5

extension Bundle {
    public var appName: String { getInfo("CFBundleName")  }
    public var displayName: String {getInfo("CFBundleDisplayName")}
    public var language: String {getInfo("CFBundleDevelopmentRegion")}
    public var identifier: String {getInfo("CFBundleIdentifier")}
    public var copyright: String {getInfo("NSHumanReadableCopyright").replacingOccurrences(of: "\\\\n", with: "\n") }
    
    public var appBuild: String { getInfo("CFBundleVersion") }
    public var appVersionLong: String { getInfo("CFBundleShortVersionString") }
    //public var appVersionShort: String { getInfo("CFBundleShortVersion") }
    
    fileprivate func getInfo(_ str: String) -> String { infoDictionary?[str] as? String ?? "⚠️" }
}

usage (SwiftUI sample):

    Text("Ver: \(Bundle.main.appVersionLong) (\(Bundle.main.appBuild)) ")
    
    Text(Bundle.main.copyright)
        .font(.system(size: 10, weight: .thin))
        .multilineTextAlignment(.center)

Bonus: Copyright supports \n symbols!

enter image description here

2
  • Cannot find getInfo in scope? which package needs to import?
    – Binh Ho
    Apr 8 at 9:42
  • 1
    @BinhHo - getInfo is function written in first block of code of my answer :) Apr 8 at 12:23
24

Bundle+Extension.swift (SwiftUI, Swift 5, Xcode 11)

I combined ideas from a few answers, and extended a bit:

  • a SwiftUI example
  • Displays a warning triangle emoticon (rather than crashing the app) if the key is missing from the Info.plist

import Foundation

extension Bundle {
    
    public var appVersionShort: String {
        if let result = infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String {
            return result
        } else {
            return "⚠️"
        }
    }
    public var appVersionLong: String {
        if let result = infoDictionary?["CFBundleVersion"] as? String {
            return result
        } else {
            return "⚠️"
        }
    }
    public var appName: String {
        if let result = infoDictionary?["CFBundleName"] as? String {
            return result
        } else {
            return "⚠️"
        }
    }
}

SwiftUI example use

VStack {

     Text("Version: \(Bundle.main.appVersionShort!) (\(Bundle.main.appVersionLong!))")
                    .font(.subheadline)
                    .frame(maxWidth: .infinity, maxHeight: .infinity)
}
1
  • 4
    I think it's unnecessary to return optional strings in the Bundle extension methods; regular ones work as well with the fallback.
    – Gyfis
    Oct 1, 2020 at 8:04
19

I created an extension for UIApplication.

extension UIApplication {
    static var appVersion: String {
        let versionNumber = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?[IdentifierConstants.InfoPlist.versionNumber] as? String
        let buildNumber = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?[IdentifierConstants.InfoPlist.buildNumber] as? String
        
        let formattedBuildNumber = buildNumber.map {
            return "(\($0))"
        }

        return [versionNumber,formattedBuildNumber].compactMap { $0 }.joined(separator: " ")
    }
}

enum Constants {
    enum InfoPlist {
        static let versionNumber = "CFBundleShortVersionString"
        static let buildNumber = "CFBundleVersion"
    }
}
1
  • Great solution! Small tweaks possibly to help slower/newer developers. "enum Constants" should be "enum Identifier Constants" or vice versa. "import UIKit" was required on my project. Finally to call its just Application.appVersion Feb 1, 2021 at 23:32
17

For Swift 3.0 NSBundle doesn't work, Following code works perfectly.

let versionNumberString =
      Bundle.main.object(forInfoDictionaryKey: "CFBundleShortVersionString")
          as! String

and for just the build number, it is:

let buildNumberString =
      Bundle.main.object(forInfoDictionaryKey: "CFBundleVersion")
          as! String

Confusingly 'CFBundleVersion' is the build number as entered in Xcode on General->Identity.

0
16

Xcode 9.4.1 Swift 4.1

Note the use of localizedInfoDictionary to pick up the right language version of the bundle display name.

var displayName: String?
var version: String?
var build: String?

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()

    // Get display name, version and build

    if let displayName = Bundle.main.localizedInfoDictionary?["CFBundleDisplayName"] as? String {
        self.displayName = displayName
    }
    if let version = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String {
        self.version = version
    }
    if let build = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleVersion"] as? String {
        self.build = build
    }
}
15

Xcode 8, Swift 3:

let gAppVersion = Bundle.main.object(forInfoDictionaryKey: "CFBundleShortVersionString") ?? "0"
let gAppBuild = Bundle.main.object(forInfoDictionaryKey: "CFBundleVersion") ?? "0"
0
14

Swift 4, useful Extension for Bundle

import Foundation

public extension Bundle {

    public var shortVersion: String {
        if let result = infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String {
            return result
        } else {
            assert(false)
            return ""
        }
    }

    public var buildVersion: String {
        if let result = infoDictionary?["CFBundleVersion"] as? String {
            return result
        } else {
            assert(false)
            return ""
        }
    }

    public var fullVersion: String {
        return "\(shortVersion)(\(buildVersion))"
    }
}
1
  • To use this you need to say Bundle.main.fullVersion for example May 19, 2020 at 19:22
13

Bundle+Extensions.swift

import Foundation

extension Bundle {
    var versionNumber: String? {
        return infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String
    }

    var buildNumber: String? {
        return infoDictionary?["CFBundleVersion"] as? String
    }

    var bundleName: String? {
        return infoDictionary?["CFBundleName"] as? String
    }
}

Usage:

someLabel.text = Bundle.main.versionNumber
12

OP asked for both version number and build number. Unfortunately most of the answers don't provide both of those options. Additionally, others add unnecessary extension methods. Here's one that's pretty simple and solves OP's problem:

// Example output: "1.0 (234)"
private func versionAndBuildNumber() -> String {
  let versionNumber = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String
  let buildNumber = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleVersion"] as? String
  if let versionNumber = versionNumber, let buildNumber = buildNumber {
    return "\(versionNumber) (\(buildNumber))"
  } else if let versionNumber = versionNumber {
    return versionNumber
  } else if let buildNumber = buildNumber {
    return buildNumber
  } else {
    return ""
  }
}
9

My answer (as at Aug 2015), given Swift keeps evolving:

let version = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary!["CFBundleVersion"] as! String
7

Having looked at the documentation, I believe that the following is cleaner:

let version = 
NSBundle.mainBundle().objectForInfoDictionaryKey("CFBundleShortVersionString") 
as? String

Source: "Use of this method is preferred over other access methods because it returns the localized value of a key when one is available."

1
  • 1
    thats the right Swift way, no force unwrap, anywhere
    – Juan Boero
    Mar 22, 2016 at 17:53
7

Swift 5.3

let infoDictionaryKey = kCFBundleVersionKey as String
guard let currentVersion = Bundle.main.object(forInfoDictionaryKey: infoDictionaryKey) as? String
else { fatalError("Expected to find a bundle version in the info dictionary") }
6

For Swift 5.0 :

let appVersion = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as! String
5

For Swift 1.2 it's:

let version = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary!["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as! String
let build = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary!["CFBundleVersion"] as! String
1
4

Swift 3:

Version Number

if let versionNumberString = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String { // do something }

Build number

if let buildNumberString = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleVersion"] as? String { // do something }
2
3

Here's an updated version for Swift 3.2:

extension UIApplication
{
    static var appVersion:String
    {
        if let appVersion = Bundle.main.object(forInfoDictionaryKey: "CFBundleShortVersionString")
        {
            return "\(appVersion)"
        }
        return ""
    }

    static var buildNumber:String
    {
        if let buildNum = Bundle.main.object(forInfoDictionaryKey: kCFBundleVersionKey as String)
        {
            return "\(buildNum)"
        }
        return ""
    }

    static var versionString:String
    {
        return "\(appVersion).\(buildNumber)"
    }
}
3

Swift 4

func getAppVersion() -> String {
    return "\(Bundle.main.infoDictionary!["CFBundleShortVersionString"] ?? "")"
}

Bundle.main.infoDictionary!["CFBundleShortVersionString"]

Swift old syntax

let appVer: AnyObject? = NSBundle.mainBundle().infoDictionary!["CFBundleShortVersionString"]
2
extension UIApplication {

    static var appVersion: String {
        if let appVersion = NSBundle.mainBundle().objectForInfoDictionaryKey("CFBundleShortVersionString") {
            return "\(appVersion)"
        } else {
            return ""
        }
    }

    static var build: String {
        if let buildVersion = NSBundle.mainBundle().objectForInfoDictionaryKey(kCFBundleVersionKey as String) {
            return "\(buildVersion)"
        } else {
            return ""
        }
    }

    static var versionBuild: String {
        let version = UIApplication.appVersion
        let build = UIApplication.build

        var versionAndBuild = "v\(version)"

        if version != build {
            versionAndBuild = "v\(version)(\(build))"
        }

        return versionAndBuild
    }

}

Attention: You should use if let here in case that the app version or build is not set which will lead to crash if you try to use ! to unwrap.

2

Update for Swift 5

here's a function i'm using to decide whether to show an "the app updated" page or not. It returns the build number, which i'm converting to an Int:

if let version: String = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleVersion"] as? String {
        guard let intVersion = Int(version) else { return }
        
        if UserDefaults.standard.integer(forKey: "lastVersion") < intVersion {
            print("need to show popup")
        } else {
            print("Don't need to show popup")
        }
        
        UserDefaults.standard.set(intVersion, forKey: "lastVersion")
    }

If never used before it will return 0 which is lower than the current build number. To not show such a screen to new users, just add the build number after the first login or when the on-boarding is complete.

2

You can now use a constant for this, rather than having to use stringly-typed code like before, which makes things even more convenient.

var appVersion: String {
    return Bundle.main.infoDictionary![kCFBundleVersionKey as String] as! String
}
2
public var appVersionNumberString: String {
    get {
        return Bundle.main.object(forInfoDictionaryKey: "CFBundleShortVersionString") as! String
    }
}
2
if let version = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as? String {
            self.lblAppVersionValue.text = version
        }
1

SWIFT 4

//First get the nsObject by defining as an optional AnyObject

let nsObject: AnyObject? = Bundle.main.infoDictionary?["CFBundleShortVersionString"] as AnyObject

//Then just cast the object as a String, but be careful, you may want to double check for nil

let version = nsObject as! String

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