4

I have thoroughly searched for this topic all over the internet, and the threads are either dead, or use a different method than what is described in my book.

For example, http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/square-root-of-a-perfect-square/ . This doesn't work for me because my algorithm needs to loop until it reaches 1% of the last "guess".

Here is the question from the text.

The Babylonian algorithm to compute the square root of a number n is as follows:

  1. Make a guess at the number (you can pick n/2 as your initial guess).
  2. Compute r = n / guess
  3. Set guess = (guess + r) / 2
  4. Go back to step 2 for as many iterations as necessary. The more that steps 2 and 3 are repeated, the closer guess will become to the square root of n.

Write a program that inputs an integer for n, iterates through the Babylonian algorithm until guess is within 1% of the previous guess, and outputs the answer as a double.

I have written the following code:

#include <iostream>

using std::cout;
using std::cin;
using std::endl;

int main()
{
int  n;
double r, guess(4), lastGuess;

cout << "Enter a number to find the square root of: ";
cin >> n;

do
{

    r = n / guess;
    lastGuess = guess;
    guess = ( guess + r ) / 2;

//  cout <<"Guess: " << guess << endl;
//  cout <<"Last Guess: " << lastGuess << endl;

    cout << "Guess : " << guess  << endl;
    cout << "Last Guess 1% = " << lastGuess + ( lastGuess * 0.01 ) << endl;
    cout << "r = " << r << endl;

} while( guess >= lastGuess * 0.01 );
cout << r;

return 0;
}

The program computes the right answer for r, but the loop doesn't terminate despite guess being greater than 1% added to lastGuess.

This program produces the following output when inputting 144 as n.

....
r = 12
Guess : 12
Last Guess 1% = 12.12
r = 12
Guess : 12
Last Guess 1% = 12.12
r = 12
Guess : 12
Last Guess 1% = 12.12
r = 12
Guess : 12
Last Guess 1% = 12.12
....

The root (r) is correct (12). The guess is LESS than lastGuess (12 < 12.12), which should return a false to the condition, correct?. Why is the loop not ending?

4

If you want to add 1% you need to multiply by 1.01, not 0.01.

while( guess >= lastGuess * 1.01 );

By the way, this iterates while guess is growing by more than 1%. You should also allow for the opposite, that it may have shrunk by more than 1%. The approximation could approach the answer from either direction. (It will approach positive roots from the right and negative roots from the left.)

  • Right! This is correct. My original expression was lastGuess +( lastGuess * 0.01 ). I took it out for a reason I cannot recall. It makes sense now. That should be the same thing as (lastGuess * 1.01). I also see what you mean now when n is less than 4. Thanks a lot! – Anthony Santiago Sep 22 '14 at 3:39
  • "You should also allow for the opposite, that it may have shrunk by more than 1%" Fortunately the iterates are alternately too high and too low. – David Eisenstat Sep 22 '14 at 3:46
  • @DavidEisenstat Newton's method can alternate. The Babylonian method tends to converge from the right. – John Kugelman Sep 22 '14 at 3:57
  • Actually, it always converges from the right, so my comment about the other check being redundant stands. – David Eisenstat Sep 22 '14 at 4:35
  • @DavidEisenstat Technically, when you take negative roots into account, it will converge from the outside. If you guess -20 for the square root of 100, it will converge to -10 from the left. – John Kugelman Sep 22 '14 at 4:45
3

While printing your lastGuess you are using

 lastGuess + ( lastGuess * 0.01 )

But while checking loop condition you are using

lastGuess*0.01

So in loop condition use the same equation which you are using for printing lastGuess value.

0

To properly exit the loop, use something similar to this.

void f(int N)
{
    double x = N / 4;
    double prev = 0.0f;

    while(1)
    {
        x = 0.5 * (x + N / x);
        if (prev == x)
            break;

        prev = x;
        printf("val: %f\n", x);
    }

    printf("SQRT(%d) = %f\n", N, x);
}

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