9

Let's say there are these generic types in C#:

class Entity<KeyType>
{
    public KeyType Id { get; private set; }
    ...
}

interface IRepository<KeyType, EntityType> where EntityType : Entity<KeyType>
{
    EntityType Get(KeyType id);
    ...
}

and these concrete types:

class Person : Entity<int> { ... }

interface IPersonRepository : IRepository<int, Person> { ... }

Now the definition of PersonRepository is redundant: the fact that the KeyType of Person is int is stated explicitly, although it can be deduced from the fact that Person is a subtype of Entity<int>.

It would be nice to be able to define IPersonRepository like this:

interface IPersonRepository : IRepository<Person> { ... }

and let the compiler figure out that the KeyType is int. Is it possible?

16
  • How should it be able to know the KeyType? Can you show the full syntax of what you expect? Your last interface definition looks not complete. Sep 22 '14 at 9:14
  • 3
    I'm presuming the last line of code should be interface IPersonRepository : IRepository<Person> { ... }
    – Rawling
    Sep 22 '14 at 9:17
  • 2
    Now try writing the Get method in your IPersonRepository without having to hard code int there and you'll realise there's not a great deal of benefit to this proposal. Sep 22 '14 at 9:18
  • 1
    Of course KeyType is not found: you did not declare it in the definition of your interface.
    – Dennis_E
    Sep 22 '14 at 9:19
  • 1
    I wonder why people are trying to make everything generic. Generic repositories for generic entities with generic key types... Abstractions of abstractions of abstractions make life very complicated. I think reuse is highly overrated in our trade. Sep 22 '14 at 9:33
2

No, C#'s type system is not sufficiently advanced to express what you want. The feature needed is called higher kinded type which are often found in strongly typed functional languages (Haskell, OCaml, Scala).

Working our way back, you want to be able to write

interface IRepository<EntityType<EntityKey>> {
  EntityType<EntityKey> Get(KeyType id);
}

interface PersonRepository : IRepository<Person> {
  Person Get(Int id);
}

but in C# there is no way to express the kind EntityType or, in other words, that the type parameter has some generic parameter and use that generic parameter in your code.

Side note: The Repository pattern is Evil and must die in a fire.

5
  • Wonderful answer. But why is the repository pattern evil? What alternatives would you suggest?
    – proskor
    Sep 24 '14 at 7:32
  • There is no usecase for a repository pattern. It works against you because generally they're a subinterface of the ORM you're using underneath that just forwards calls. It doesn't help with mocking and/or testing (you can't seriously mock where/get when you have to take in to account which expressions your database provider does and doesn't supply), it doesn't make your code more modular, it adds an extra layer of complexity, and in the rare case you are swapping out your ORM (yeah, right), you probably have to delve in to business logic anyway because of different performance charactersics.
    – Martijn
    Sep 24 '14 at 9:11
  • As for alternatives, just use your ORM directly rather than wrapping it in a repository.
    – Martijn
    Sep 24 '14 at 9:14
  • You have a point, but I still feel uncomfortable accessing the ORM implementation directly. True, most operations on a repository just forward calls to the ORM, but IMHO it still makes sense to shield business operations from the detais of accessing the infrastructure. Saying UserRepository.ActiveUsers is different (and much more clear) than something like Session.CreateCriteria<User>().Add(Restrictions.Eq("_active", true)).List<User>(). Any besides, doesn't the same performance argument apply to just accessing the database directly, not using ORM at all?
    – proskor
    Sep 24 '14 at 9:38
  • let me rephrase that :) A generic repository (UserRepository.Save(User)) doesn't do much. Isolating data access stuff like ActiveUsers from your business logic can make sense, especially if there is much data logic that isn't business logic in there. I would personally opt for extension methods on ISession for NHibernate or putting them directly in the DbContext for EF rather than wrapping them.
    – Martijn
    Sep 24 '14 at 10:27
1

Let's say we want to declare

interface IPersonRepository : IRepository<Person> { }

That would require that there is a generic interface with one type parameter IRepository<EntityType>.

interface IRepository<EntityType> where EntityType : Entity<KeyType>
{
    EntityType Get(KeyType id);
}

At the end of the first line, you refer to a thing called KeyType, which hasn't been declared nor defined. There is no type called "KeyType".

This would work though:

interface IRepository<EntityType> where EntityType : Entity<int>
{
    EntityType Get(int id);
}

Or this:

interface IRepository<EntityType> where EntityType : Entity<string>
{
    EntityType Get(string id);
}

But you cannot have both conflicting definitions at the same time of course. Obviously, you're not happy with that, because you want to be able to define your IRpository interface in such a way that it works with other key types as well.

Well, you can, if you make it generic in the key type:

interface IRepository<KeyType, EntityType> where EntityType : Entity<KeyType>
{
    EntityType Get(KeyType id);
}

There is an alternative approach:

interface IRepository<KeyType>
{
    EntityType<KeyType> Get(KeyType id);
}

Now you can define

class PersonRepository : IRepository<int>
{
    public EntityType<int> Get(int id) { ... }
}

Obviously, you wouldn't be happy with that, because you would like to state that the Get method must return a Person, not just any Entity<int>.

The generic interface with two type parameters in the only solution. And indeed, there is a required relationship between them, as expressed in the constraint. But there is no redundancy here: specifying int for the type parameter doesn't carry enough information.

If we say

class PersonRepository : IRepository<int, Person>
{
    public Person Get(int id) { ... }
}

There is indeed redundancy: specifying the type parameter int is redundant when the type parameter Person has already been specified.

It would be possible to come op with a syntax that make it possible to infer the KeyType. For example, Patrick Hoffman suggested:

class PersonRepository : IRepository<EntityType: Person>. 
{
    public Person Get(int id) { ... }
}

While theoretically possible, I fear that this would add a lot of complexity to the language specification and the compiler, for very little gain. In fact, is there any gain at all? You certainly wouldn't be saving keystrokes! Compare these two:

// current syntax
class PersonRepository : IRepository<int, Person>
{
    public Person Get(int id) { ... }
}

// proposed syntax
class PersonRepository : IRepository<EntityType: Person>
{
    public Person Get(int id) { ... }
}

The language is what it is, and it doesn't look too bad to me.

1
  • 2
    interface IPersonRepository : IRepository<int, Person> Knowing that the first type parameter for IRepository is supposed to be the same for Person makes stating it explicitly in the declaration of IPersonRepository redundant, since it has been already declared: class Person : Entity<int>. The problem I have is to tell the compiler that they are indeed supposed to be the same, i.e. infer the type from the declaration of Person.
    – proskor
    Sep 22 '14 at 9:48
-1

No, that is not possible to write that, since it doesn't infer the type (the compiler doesn't).

It should be possible to do so (you need to be part of the C# compiler team though to get it in), since there is no other value possible that the value of KeyType put into the type parameter for Entity. You can't put in a derived type or a base class type.

As others commented though, it might over complicate your code. Also, this only works in the case that Entity<T> is a class, when it is an interface it can't infer the type since it can have multiple implementations. (Maybe that is the ultimate reason they didn't build this in)

7
  • you need to be part of the C# compiler team though to get it in - well, you could always fork Roslyn, if you don't mind no-one else being able to compile your code :)
    – Rawling
    Sep 22 '14 at 9:43
  • 2
    @Rawling: I look forward to your implementation ;) Sep 22 '14 at 9:43
  • What exactly would the syntax look like? interface IRepository<EntityType> where EntityType : Entity<KeyType> is existing syntax with a well defined meaning. Of course, the compiler cannot compile that if the type KeyType does not exist. See also my answer. Sep 22 '14 at 9:47
  • Maybe IRepository<EntityType: Person>. That makes the KeyType 'optional'. Sep 22 '14 at 9:48
  • That might actually work. I fear it would add a lot of complexity to the language specification and the compiler though, for very little gain. I'd prefer the compiler team to spend their time on something more useful. Sep 22 '14 at 9:52

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