53

I was wondering if anybody could help me rework this method to find the height of a binary search tree. So far, my code looks like this. However, the answer I'm getting is larger than the actual height by 1. But when I remove the +1 from my return statements, it's less than the actual height by 1. I'm still trying to wrap my head around recursion with these BST. Any help would be much appreciated.

public int findHeight(){
    if(this.isEmpty()){
        return 0;
    }
    else{
        TreeNode<T> node = root;
        return findHeight(node);
    }
}
private int findHeight(TreeNode<T> aNode){
    int heightLeft = 0;
    int heightRight = 0;
    if(aNode.left!=null)
        heightLeft = findHeight(aNode.left);
    if(aNode.right!=null)
        heightRight = findHeight(aNode.right);
    if(heightLeft > heightRight){
        return heightLeft+1;
    }
    else{
        return heightRight+1;
    }
}
  • Well I got it to return the correct height by returning findHeight(node)-1 in my public method. However I just feel like this is sloppy code, any suggestions on a revamp? – mike Apr 8 '10 at 5:03
  • Is this the right approach for solving the tree height ?github.com/joeyajames/Python/issues/1 – rittam Jan 18 '17 at 14:34

22 Answers 22

103

The problem lies in your base case.

"The height of a tree is the length of the path from the root to the deepest node in the tree. A (rooted) tree with only a node (the root) has a height of zero." - Wikipedia

If there is no node, you want to return -1 not 0. This is because you are adding 1 at the end.

So if there isn't a node, you return -1 which cancels out the +1.

int findHeight(TreeNode<T> aNode) {
    if (aNode == null) {
        return -1;
    }

    int lefth = findHeight(aNode.left);
    int righth = findHeight(aNode.right);

    if (lefth > righth) {
        return lefth + 1;
    } else {
        return righth + 1;
    }
}
  • 2
    Yes this works correctly without having to subtract 1 in my public method. I am still confused as to how this method works with recursion. I declared ints left and right after the if statement, but I dont understand how they are incremented through this method – mike Apr 8 '10 at 5:38
  • 1
    This method works by subtracting 1 at the base case, they are incremented like every other method given, when you go deeper into the tree you add 1 to the height. – Corey Apr 8 '10 at 5:44
  • where did you find your quote The height of a tree is the length of the path from the root to the deepest node in the tree. A (rooted) tree with only a node (the root) has a height of zero? In the wiki page, there is no such quote – Jackson Tale Jul 17 '14 at 7:56
  • 2
    For those confused about how this recursion works, I've made a video which first explains the process on a high level, and then we run through the code with an example: Find height of binary tree. Hopefully many of you will find it useful, and in that case we should probably add it to this answer. – cute_ptr Apr 14 '18 at 11:55
  • "The height of a node in a tree is the number of edges on the longest simple downward path from the node to a leaf, and the height of a tree is the height of its root." is from p. 1177 of CLRS (3rd ed.). Based on this definition, a tree consisting of a single (root) node has height zero, which implies this is the only correct answer. – tmakino Nov 26 '18 at 14:47
32

The height of a binary search tree is equal to number of layers - 1.

See the diagram at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_tree

Your recursion is good, so just subtract one at the root level.

Also note, you can clean up the function a bit by handling null nodes:

int findHeight(node) {
  if (node == null) return 0;
  return 1 + max(findHeight(node.left), findHeight(node.right));
}
  • My first attempt at this method I used something along these lines however I kept getting a StackOverFlow exception for some reason when I ran my code? Im assuming because I check for pointers pointing to null? – mike Apr 8 '10 at 5:14
  • (Removed comment about c++, which doesn't apply). It's likely that your "node == null" wasn't terminating properly. – Stephen Apr 8 '10 at 5:21
  • 2
    @Matthew: You're right, but I had suggested that his public function subtract one from the result. Instead, you could "fix" the recursive function by returning -1 in the base case. – Stephen Apr 8 '10 at 5:57
  • 1
    Can someone please how this recursion works? – MortalMan Nov 24 '15 at 3:26
  • 1
    if (node == null) return -1 instead worked for me – harsh_v Aug 29 '16 at 7:46
19
int getHeight(Node node) {
 if (node == null) return -1;

 return 1 + Math.max(getHeight(node.left), getHeight(node.right));
}
8

IMO, you code would benefit from being simplified a bit. Rather than attempting to end the recursion when a child pointer is null, only end it when the current pointer is null. That makes the code a lot simpler to write. In pseudo-code it looks something like this:

if (node = null)
    return 0;
else
    left = height(node->left);
    right = height(node->right);
    return 1 + max(left, right);
  • 1
    Can't call a method on a null object, though :) – jemfinch Apr 8 '10 at 5:11
  • 4
    @jemfinch, where is he calling it on a null object, isn't that what the base case is for? – Corey Apr 8 '10 at 5:15
  • 1
    @jemfinch:I guess it's a good thing I didn't suggest doing such a thing! – Jerry Coffin Apr 8 '10 at 5:21
  • why do you return 0 instead of -1? – johnny 5 Jun 3 at 1:08
  • @johnny5: Hard to be sure what I was thinking 9 years ago when I wrote it, but when something looks like homework, I fairly routinely leave it just a tiny bit wrong, so if somebody hands it in as homework without testing and fixing, I can at least hope they won't get a great grade. Especially true when it looks like the OP can figure out how to deal with it, as seems to be the case here. – Jerry Coffin Jun 3 at 1:47
4

This is untested, but fairly obviously correct:

private int findHeight(Treenode aNode) {
  if (aNode.left == null && aNode.right == null) {
    return 0; // was 1; apparently a node with no children has a height of 0.
  } else if (aNode.left == null) {
    return 1 + findHeight(aNode.right);
  } else if (aNode.right == null) {
    return 1 + findHeight(aNode.left);
  } else {
    return 1 + max(findHeight(aNode.left), findHeight(aNode.right));
  }
}

Often simplifying your code is easier than figuring out why it's off by one. This code is easy to understand: the four possible cases are clearly handled in an obviously correct manner:

  • If both the left and right trees are null, return 1, since a single node by definition has a height of 1.
  • If either the left or right trees (but not both!) are null, return the height of the non-null tree, plus 1 to account for the added height of the current node.
  • If neither tree is null, return the height of the taller subtree, again plus one for the current node.
  • This code works, and is clearer than what I had however, it is still returning the height +1. In my book, height is defined as the length of the path from the root to its deepest leaf. So from my understanding a BST containing 15, 25, 30, 45 (in this order) would have a height of only 3 correct? – mike Apr 8 '10 at 5:30
  • Actually, a tree with only the root node has a height of 0 not 1. – Corey Apr 8 '10 at 5:40
  • 1
    Strange. It really ought not be called "height" if what they really mean is "paths-to-descend," but that seems to be the standard terminology, unfortunately. The correct way to fix this is to change the first case (node.left == null && node.right == null) to return 0. – jemfinch Apr 8 '10 at 5:59
4
class Solution{
    public static int getHeight(Node root) {
        int height = -1;

        if (root == null) {
            return height;
        } else {
            height = 1 + Math.max(getHeight(root.left), getHeight(root.right));
        }

        return height;
    }
4

For people like me who like one line solutions:

public int getHeight(Node root) {
    return Math.max(root.left != null ? getHeight(root.left) : -1, 
                    root.right != null ? getHeight(root.right) : -1) 
                    + 1;
}
3

Here's a concise and hopefully correct way to express it:

  private int findHeight(TreeNode<T> aNode){
    if(aNode == null || (aNode.left == null && aNode.right == null))
      return 0;
    return Math.max(findHeight(aNode.left), findHeight(aNode.right)) + 1;
  }

If the current node is null, there's no tree. If both children are, there's a single layer, which means 0 height. This uses the definition of height (mentioned by Stephen) as # of layers - 1

3
    public void HeightRecursive()
    {
        Console.WriteLine( HeightHelper(root) ); 
    }

    private int HeightHelper(TreeNode node)
    {
        if (node == null)
        {
            return -1;
        }
        else
        {
            return 1 + Math.Max(HeightHelper(node.LeftNode),HeightHelper(node.RightNode));           
        }
    }

C# code. Include these two methods in your BST class. you need two method to calculate height of tree. HeightHelper calculate it, & HeightRecursive print it in main().

2

The definition given above of the height is incorrect. That is the definition of the depth.

"The depth of a node M in a tree is the length of the path from the root of the tree to M. The height of a tree is one more than the depth of the deepest node in the tree. All nodes of depth d are at level d in the tree. The root is the only node at level 0, and its depth is 0."

Citation: "A Practical Introduction to Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis" Edition 3.2 (Java Version) Clifford A. Shaffer Department of Computer Science Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA 24061

2
public int height(){

    if(this.root== null) return 0;

    int leftDepth = nodeDepth(this.root.left, 1);
    int rightDepth = nodeDepth(this.root.right, 1);

    int height = leftDepth > rightDepth? leftDepth: rightDepth;

    return height;
}


private int nodeDepth(Node node, int startValue){

    int nodeDepth = 0;

    if(node.left == null && node.right == null) return startValue;
    else{
        startValue++;
        if(node.left!= null){
            nodeDepth = nodeDepth(node.left, startValue);
        }

        if(node.right!= null){
            nodeDepth = nodeDepth(node.right, startValue);
        }
    }

    return nodeDepth;
}
2
int height(Node* root) {
        if(root==NULL) return -1;
        return max(height(root->left),height(root->right))+1;
}

Take of maximum height from left and right subtree and add 1 to it.This also handles the base case(height of Tree with 1 node is 0).

1

I guess this question could mean two different things...

  1. Height is the number of nodes in the longest branch:-

    int calcHeight(node* root){ if(root==NULL) return 0; int l=calcHeight(root->left); int r=calcHeight(root->right); if(l>r) return l+1; else return r+1; }

  2. Height is the total number of nodes in the tree itself:

    int calcSize(node* root){ if(root==NULL) return 0; return(calcSize(root->left)+1+calcSize(root->right)); }

1
public int getHeight(Node node)
{
    if(node == null)
        return 0;

    int left_val = getHeight(node.left);
    int right_val = getHeight(node.right);
    if(left_val > right_val)
        return left_val+1;
    else
        return right_val+1;
}
1

Set a tempHeight as a static variable(initially 0).

static void findHeight(Node node, int count) {

    if (node == null) {
        return;
    }
    if ((node.right == null) && (node.left == null)) {
        if (tempHeight < count) {
            tempHeight = count;

        }

    }

    findHeight(node.left, ++count);
    count--; //reduce the height while traversing to a different branch
    findHeight(node.right, ++count);

}
1

Here is a solution in Java a bit lengthy but works..

public static int getHeight (Node root){
    int lheight = 0, rheight = 0;
    if(root==null) {
        return 0;
    }
    else {
        if(root.left != null) {
            lheight = 1 + getHeight(root.left);
            System.out.println("lheight" + " " + lheight);
        }
        if (root.right != null) {
            rheight = 1+ getHeight(root.right);
            System.out.println("rheight" + " " + rheight);
        }
        if(root != null && root.left == null && root.right == null) {
            lheight += 1; 
            rheight += 1;
        }

    }
    return Math.max(lheight, rheight);
    }
1
 int getHeight(Node* root)
 {
   if(root == NULL) return -1;
   else             return max(getHeight(root->left), getHeight(root->right)) + 1;
 }
1

//function to find height of BST

int height(Node* root) {
    if(root == NULL){
        return -1;
    }

    int sum=0;
    int rheight = height(root->right);
    int lheight = height(root->left);

    if(lheight>rheight){
        sum = lheight +1;
    }
    if(rheight > lheight){
        sum = rheight + 1;
    }

    return sum;
}
1

Here is a solution in C#

    private static int heightOfTree(Node root)
    {
        if (root == null)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        int left = 1 + heightOfTree(root.left);
        int right = 1 + heightOfTree(root.right);

        return Math.Max(left, right);
    }
0

For anyone else that reads this!!!!

HEIGHT is defined as the number of nodes in the longest path from the root node to a leaf node. Therefore: a tree with only a root node has a height of 1 and not 0.

The LEVEL of a given node is the distance from the root plus 1. Therefore: The root is on level 1, its child nodes are on level 2 and so on.

(Information courtesy of Data Structures: Abstraction and Design Using Java, 2nd Edition, by Elliot B. Koffman & Paul A. T. Wolfgang) - Book used in Data Structures Course I am currently taking at Columbus State University.

  • 6
    FOR ANYONE ELSE THAT READS THIS!!!! This definition of height is wrong! The height of a tree is the number of edges from the root node to the furthest leaf node (or one of the furthest if there are a number of equidistant leaves). Since it's edges, a tree with only a root node will have a height of zero. Go to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_(data_structure)#Definition and read "Height of node" and "Height of tree". Additionally both the Cormen and the Weiss algorithms textbooks backup this definition. The given definition of level is correct. – Nick Chapman Dec 14 '15 at 3:46
0

enter image description here

According to "Introduction to Algorithms" by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein, following is the definition of tree height:

The height of a node in a tree is the number of edges on the longest simple downward path from the node to a leaf, and the height of a tree is the height of its root. The height of a tree is also equal to the largest depth of any node in the tree.

Following is my ruby solution. Most of the people forgot about height of empty tree or tree of single node in their implementation.

def height(node, current_height)
  return current_height if node.nil? || (node.left.nil? && node.right.nil?)
  return [height(node.left, current_height + 1), height(node.right, current_height + 1)].max if node.left && node.right
  return height(node.left, current_height + 1) if node.left
  return height(node.right, current_height + 1)
end
0
int maxDepth(BinaryTreeNode root) {
    if(root == null || (root.left == null && root.right == null)) {
       return 0;
    }

    return 1 + Math.max(maxDepth(root.left), maxDepth(root.right));
}
  • 6
    Hi Phat, welcome to StackOverflow. Could you add some sentences to your answer to explain what the central point is. That would make it more helpful. – Kaadzia May 5 at 8:15

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