0

I use a dictionary<string,string>. Key is an url, Value is a name.

As types are same, I looking for a way to avoid coding error when key, value inversion. I wanted something like this Dictionary<UrlString,NameString> but I can't create my own type inherited from string because is sealed.

So is there a simple way ? Thanks

  • 1
    Try the Url type. Or even the Uri type. – Andrei V Sep 23 '14 at 8:02
  • of course!! I'm feeling stupid.. Thanks – Julian50 Sep 23 '14 at 8:05
  • @AndreiV for this case ok because url exists! but for example dictionary<int,int> with key is an id and value is an size ? – Julian50 Sep 23 '14 at 8:07
  • Dictionary<object,int>? – Andrei V Sep 23 '14 at 8:12
2

First, you can use Uri class

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.uri(v=vs.110).aspx

However, you can design your own class, the only thing you have to do is to implement Equals and GetHashCode in order to use the class as Dictionary Key:

// You can implement in the same manner whatever domain you want:
// Url, Size, Id, Voltage etc.
public sealed class UrlString {
  public UrlString(String address) {
    if (Object.ReferenceEquals(null, address))
      throw new ArgumentNullException("address");

    Address = address;
  }  

  public String Address {
    get;
    private set;
  }

  public override Boolean Equals(Object obj) {
    if (Object.ReferenceEquals(obj, this))
      return true;

    UrlString other = obj as UrlString;

    if (Object.ReferenceEquals(other, null))
      return false;

    return String.Equals(Address, other.Address, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
  }

  public override int GetHashCode() {
    return String.IsNullOrEmpty(Address) ? 0 : Address.ToUpperInvariant().GetHashCode();
  }
}
  • perfect thanks! – Julian50 Sep 23 '14 at 8:16
0

In general, it's not a good practice to customize collections for business functions, it's better to implement some custom methods, but you certainly can.

I can figure out at least two ways of doing this. 1. Using a custom struct with implicit cast operators, which performs check in constructor. Works for value types. 2. Using IEqualityComparer, which is better, because works without altering initial IDictionary signature.

Here is the code sample with tests for both variants:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;

namespace LimitingUseOfValueTypeAsDictionaryKey
{
    public struct MySpecialInt
    {
        public int Target;

        public MySpecialInt(int source)
        {
            if (source == 123)
            {
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("source");
            }
            Target = source;
        }

        public static implicit operator int(MySpecialInt source)
        {
            return source.Target;
        }

        public static implicit operator MySpecialInt(int source)
        {
            return new MySpecialInt(source);
        }
    }

    public class LimitingIntComparer : IEqualityComparer<int>
    {
        public int Compare(int x, int y)
        {
            return x.CompareTo(y);
        }

        public bool Equals(int x, int y)
        {
            return x.Equals(y);
        }

        public int GetHashCode(int source)
        {
            if (source == 123)
            {
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("source");
            }
            return source.GetHashCode();
        }
    }

    public class LimitingStringComparer : IEqualityComparer<string>
    {
        public bool Equals(string x, string y)
        {
            return object.Equals(x, y);
        }

        public int GetHashCode(string source)
        {
            if (source == "123")
            {
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("source");
            }
            return source.GetHashCode();
        }
    }

    [TestClass]
    public class UnitTest1
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void CanTreatMySpecialIntAsRegularInt()
        {
            var a = 1;
            MySpecialInt b = a;
            Assert.AreEqual((int)b, 1);
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void CanUseOnlyAllowedValuesAsAKeyUsingCustomStruct()
        {
            var d = new Dictionary<MySpecialInt, string>();
            d.Add(1, "foo");

            try
            {
                d.Add(123, "bar");
            }
            catch (ArgumentOutOfRangeException)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Can't do that");
            }

            Assert.AreEqual(1, d.Count);
            Assert.AreEqual("foo", d[1]);
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void CanUseOnlyAllowedValuesAsAKeyUsingUsingComparer()
        {
            var d = new Dictionary<int, string>(new LimitingIntComparer());
            d.Add(1, "foo");

            try
            {
                d.Add(123, "bar");
            }
            catch (ArgumentOutOfRangeException)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Can't do that");
            }

            Assert.AreEqual(1, d.Count);
            Assert.AreEqual("foo", d[1]);
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void CanUseOnlyAllowedValuesAsAKeyUsingUsingComparerForStrings()
        {
            var d = new Dictionary<string, string>(new LimitingStringComparer());
            d.Add("1", "foo");

            try
            {
                d.Add("123", "bar");
            }
            catch (ArgumentOutOfRangeException)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Can't do that");
            }

            Assert.AreEqual(1, d.Count);
            Assert.AreEqual("foo", d["1"]);
        }
    }
}

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