47

UPDATE: dplyr has been updated since this question was asked and now performs as the OP wanted

I´m trying to get the second to the seventh line in a data.frame using dplyr.

I´m doing this:

require(dplyr)
df <- data.frame(id = 1:10, var = runif(10))
df <- df %>% filter(row_number() <= 7, row_number() >= 2)

But this throws an error.

Error in rank(x, ties.method = "first") : 
  argument "x" is missing, with no default

I know i could easily make:

df <- df %>% mutate(rn = row_number()) %>% filter(rn <= 7, rn >= 2)

But I would like to understand why my first try is not working.

8
  • 13
    df %>% filter(row_number() %in% 2:7)
    – akrun
    Commented Sep 23, 2014 at 11:59
  • I could do that too, but why df <- df %>% filter(row_number() <= 7, row_number() >= 2) is wrong? Commented Sep 23, 2014 at 12:04
  • I don't know the real reason behind that. A double filter appears to work.
    – akrun
    Commented Sep 23, 2014 at 12:05
  • 4
    It's a bug. Please file an issue on github.com/hadley/dplyr/issues
    – hadley
    Commented Sep 23, 2014 at 22:53
  • 3
    I think it is useful to have around as long as it is clear, that it is now out of date, this way, people (like me) looking for help can see that this is not a problem. I edited the post for clarity. Commented Nov 16, 2016 at 13:18

4 Answers 4

103

Actually dplyr's slice function is made for this kind of subsetting:

df %>% slice(2:7)

(I'm a little late to the party but thought I'd add this for future readers)

1
  • 1
    thanks, this was really helpful as the error reoccurred for me. I later found out that this is a inconsistency with how row_number() treats data tables, see: stackoverflow.com/questions/23861047/…
    – Alex
    Commented Jun 21, 2016 at 23:10
29

The row_number() function does not simply return the row number of each element and so can't be used like you want:

• ‘row_number’: equivalent to ‘rank(ties.method = "first")’

You're not actually saying what you want the row_number of. In your case:

df %>% filter(row_number(id) <= 7, row_number(id) >= 2)

works because id is sorted and so row_number(id) is 1:10. I don't know what row_number() evaluates to in this context, but when called a second time dplyr has run out of things to feed it and you get the equivalent of:

> row_number()
Error in rank(x, ties.method = "first") : 
  argument "x" is missing, with no default

That's your error right there.

Anyway, that's not the way to select rows.

You simply need to subscript df[2:7,], or if you insist on pipes everywhere:

> df %>% "["(.,2:7,)
  id        var
2  2 0.52352994
3  3 0.02994982
4  4 0.90074801
5  5 0.68935493
6  6 0.57012344
7  7 0.01489950
6
  • 12
    The purpose of row_number() is definitely to return the row number (hence the name!) and this behaviour is a bug. (Also you don't need . in your piping example)
    – hadley
    Commented Sep 23, 2014 at 22:52
  • 1
    Would you care to explain how the "["(.,2:7,) syntax works? It's really interesting solution.
    – Konrad
    Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 14:49
  • 3
    Its just the way almost everything in R can be written as a function. Try "+"(1,3).
    – Spacedman
    Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 15:12
  • 2
    @Konrad as alternative you can write, slightly more readable than the "[" syntax: df %>% .[2:7, ]
    – Agile Bean
    Commented Dec 29, 2017 at 9:49
  • 1
    @Spacedman is correct, row_number does not return exactly the row number as vector, see e.g. the output of datasets::airquality %>% row_number. If you want to use it as an index vector containing the row number, you must convert it to a numeric vector like datasets::airquality %>% row_number %>% as.numeric
    – Agile Bean
    Commented Apr 5, 2019 at 3:17
8

Here is another way to do row-number based filtering in a pipeline.

    df <- data.frame(id = 1:10, var = runif(10))

    df %>% .[2:7,]

    > id     var
      2  2 0.28817
      3  3 0.56672
      4  4 0.96610
      5  5 0.74772
      6  6 0.75091
      7  7 0.05165
1
  • 1
    It's slower than slice, but it does't drop NA (e.g. df %>% .[c(NA,2,4,7),]) which could be useful in some cases.
    – Bastien
    Commented Jan 9, 2018 at 12:53
0

Another option using subset:

df <- data.frame(id = 1:10, var = runif(10))
subset(df, row.names(df) %in% 2:7)
#>   id        var
#> 2  2 0.75924106
#> 3  3 0.17096427
#> 4  4 0.10886090
#> 5  5 0.98703882
#> 6  6 0.04190195
#> 7  7 0.73268672

Created on 2023-01-13 with reprex v2.0.2

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.