1

I have a String and a String[] filled with search items.

How can I check whether my String contains all of the search items?

Here is an example:

Case 1:

String text = "this is a stupid test";
String[] searchItems = new String[2];
searchItems[0] = "stupid";
searchItems[1] = "test";

Case 2:

String text = "this is a stupid test";
String[] searchItems = new String[2];
searchItems[0] = "stupid";
searchItems[1] = "tes";

In case 1, the method should return true, but in case 2 the method should return false.

  • 1
    won't work he needs the entire word match – StackFlowed Sep 23 '14 at 15:29
  • 1
    He would have to step through the array and verify that text.contains(searchItems[i]), but it would work if implemented correctly. – Patrick J Abare II Sep 23 '14 at 15:30
  • 1
    @PatrickJAbareII it won't. – Luiggi Mendoza Sep 23 '14 at 15:31
  • 1
    This needs more tests. For example: String text="I need a car, right now."; String[] searchItems = { "car", "now" };, the flag should be true or false? – Luiggi Mendoza Sep 23 '14 at 15:32
  • 1
    @Luiigi Mendoza: the flag should be true in your case/example. The flag should only be true if text matches all patterns – Ramses Sep 24 '14 at 13:26
9

You can do this using word boundaries in regex:

boolean result = true;
for (String item : searchItems) {
    String pattern = ".*\\b" + item + "\\b.*";
    // by using the &&, result will be true only if text matches all patterns.
    result = result && text.matches(pattern);
}

The boundaries ensure that the search terms will only be matched if the whole word is present in your text. So, "tes" will not match against "test" because "\btes\b" is not a substring of "\btest\b".

  • there is a little something: result=result&&text.matches("(.*)"+pattern+"(.*)") instead of: result = result && text.matches(pattern); – Ramses Sep 24 '14 at 14:47
  • 1
    @user3300710 Good call. This is actually semi-unusual for regex, as a match normally signifies containment unless you anchor your pattern to the beginning and end of the string (ie ^pattern$). But Java's String.matches does in fact require the .*, so I will adjust my answer. – Luke Sep 24 '14 at 15:03
  • @user3300710 This answer brought the Matcher.find() method to my attention. You can use it if you want to check for containment automatically. Though, it is perhaps more verbose. – Luke Sep 26 '14 at 15:26
2

I would try to split the string with spaces and then loop thought all the splinted parts.

Something like this for your code to work:

String text = "this is a stupid test";
List<String> searchItems = new ArrayList<String>();
searchItems.add("stupid");
searchItems.add("test");
for(String word : test.split(" ")) {
   if(searchItems.contains(word)){
      //do your stuff when the condition is true ...
   } else {
      //do your stuff when the condition is false ...
   }
}
0

I would make an array of all words in the text. Then check it with 2 for loops if the textArray contains all the searchterms.

public boolean search(String text, String[] searchItems) {

    String[] textArray = text.split(" ");

    for(String searchitem: searchItems) {

       boolean b = false;

       for(String word : textArray) {

           if(word.equals(searchitem)) {
               b = true;
               break;
           }

        }

     // text doesn't contain searchitem
     if(!b) return false;

     }

     return true;

}
0
text.matches(".*\\b" + searchItems[0] + "\\b.*")

Note: "\\b" will ensure that only 'whole words' are matched.

-2
public boolean findIfAllItemsMatch(String[] searchItems, String text) {
    boolean allItemsMatch = true;
    for (String item_ : searchItems) {
        if(!text.contains(item_)) {  
              allItemsMatch = false;
              break;
         }
    }
    return allItemsMatch;
}

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