63

It seems that these two operators are pretty much the same - is there a difference? When should I use = and when ==?

2 Answers 2

85

You must use == in numeric comparisons in (( ... )):

$ if (( 3 == 3 )); then echo "yes"; fi
yes
$ if (( 3 = 3 ));  then echo "yes"; fi
bash: ((: 3 = 3 : attempted assignment to non-variable (error token is "= 3 ")

You may use either for string comparisons in [[ ... ]] or [ ... ] or test:

$ if [[ 3 == 3 ]]; then echo "yes"; fi
yes
$ if [[ 3 = 3 ]]; then echo "yes"; fi
yes
$ if [ 3 == 3 ]; then echo "yes"; fi
yes
$ if [ 3 = 3 ]; then echo "yes"; fi
yes
$ if test 3 == 3; then echo "yes"; fi
yes
$ if test 3 = 3; then echo "yes"; fi
yes

"String comparisons?", you say?

$ if [[ 10 < 2 ]]; then echo "yes"; fi    # string comparison
yes
$ if (( 10 < 2 )); then echo "yes"; else echo "no"; fi    # numeric comparison
no
$ if [[ 10 -lt 2 ]]; then echo "yes"; else echo "no"; fi  # numeric comparison
no
2
  • 6
    You should not use == with [ or test, though. == is not part of the POSIX specification, and will not work with all shells (dash, in particular, does not recognize it).
    – chepner
    Nov 10, 2015 at 19:39
  • 3
    @chepner: That's true, but the question is specifically about Bash. Nov 10, 2015 at 20:01
29

There's a subtle difference with regards to POSIX. Excerpt from the Bash reference:

string1 == string2
True if the strings are equal. = may be used in place of == for strict POSIX compliance.

1
  • No difference in bash though? Just a portability issue?
    – T.E.D.
    Apr 8, 2010 at 14:11

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