4

I'm learning CSS and I tried to create a simple layout.

I set the "header" to have a width of 100%, the "left" to have a width of 20% and the "right" 80%. But the width of the header is greater than the total width of the left and the right. Why is that and how to fix it?

    div {
        border-radius: 10px;
    }
    
    #header {
        z-index: 1;
        background-color: #80B7ED;
        height: 50px;
    	width: 100%;
        position: fixed;
    }
    
    .left {
        background-color: #5A9DE0;
        height: 400px;
        width: 20%;
        float: left;
        position: relative;
    }
    
    .right {
        background-color: #BFD9F2;
        height: 400px;
        width: 80%;
        float: right;
        position: relative;
    }
    
    #footer {
        background-color: #80B7ED;
        clear: both;
        height:70px;
    }
    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
    	<head>
    		<link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="stylesheet.css"/>
    		<title></title>
    	</head>
    	<body>
    	    <div id="header">
    	    </div>
    	    <div class="left">
    	    </div>
    	    <div class="right">
    	    </div>
    	    <div id="footer">
    	    </div>
        </body>
    </html>

Edit

Thanks to your answers and to some reading I get now that the problem is the margin of the body section. When I use body {margin: 0;} the "left" plus the "right" take a bigger place in the page and the "header" takes a smaller place, so their widths are equal.

Another solution with the same result is adding a "container" div around everything with "left: 0; right: 0; position: absolute;".

I understand why these solutions make the "left" plus the "right" bigger (so they take the whole page), what I don't get is why the "header" is suddenly smaller. If the fixed "header" is out of the regular flow, why changing the margin of the body influeces it?

body {
    margin: 0;
}

div {
    border-radius: 10px;
}

#header {
    z-index: 1;
    background-color: #80B7ED;
    border-top-left-radius: 0;
    border-top-right-radius: 0;
    top: 0;
    height: 50px;
	width: 100%;
    position: fixed;
}

.left {
    background-color: #5A9DE0;
    height: 400px;
    width: 20%;
    float: left;
    position: relative;
}

.right {
    background-color: #BFD9F2;
    height: 400px;
    width: 80%;
    float: right;
    position: relative;
}

#footer {
    background-color: #80B7ED;
    clear: both;
    height:70px;
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="stylesheet.css"/>
    <title></title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div id="header">
    </div>
    <div class="left">
    </div>
    <div class="right">
    </div>
    <div id="footer">
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

Thanks

  • margins - that's not included in the width calculation by default. e.g. a box's full width is leftmargin + leftpadding + box width + rightpadding + rightmargin. – Marc B Sep 23 '14 at 19:41
  • @MarcB there are no margins involved here ? But indeed that is a classic too – Laurent S. Sep 23 '14 at 19:44
  • there's always default margins, unless you're using a CSS reset somewhere. – Marc B Sep 23 '14 at 19:47
  • This link will help you understand more about CSS box models – GeekByDesign Sep 23 '14 at 19:52
  • Thanks for the comments. I added margin: 0; padding: 0; border: none; to the div selector and it still doesn't work. – Ella Sharakanski Sep 23 '14 at 20:28
1

Here you go:

body{
    margin:0px;
}
div {
    border-radius: 10px;
}
#wrapper {
    padding: 0%;
}
#wrap {
    float: left;
    position: relative;
    width: 100%;
}
#header {
    position:fixed;
    width:inherit;
    z-index:1;
    padding:0px;
    height:50px;
    border-radius:10px;
    background-color: #80B7ED;
}
.left {
    background-color: #5A9DE0;
    height: 400px;
    width: 20%;
    float: left;
    position: relative;
}
.right {
    background-color: #BFD9F2;
    height: 400px;
    width: 80%;
    float: right;
    position: relative;
}
#footer {
    background-color: #80B7ED;
    clear: both;
    height:70px;
}
<html>
<body>
<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="wrap">
        <div id="header"></div>
    </div>
</div>
<div class="left"></div>
<div class="right"></div>
<div id="footer"></div>
</body>
</html>

See here jsfiddle

EDIT:

If you wish to add a margin, I'd suggest you add a variable margin, for instance 2% or 3%, and then you substract that quantity from the left column, the right column, or both. And then you set the width of the #wrapp to be 100-2*x %, where x is the amount of margin you added.

  • 1
    Oops.... just realized it works on jsfiddle but not here. I'll investigate further. – tfrascaroli Sep 23 '14 at 20:30
  • Doesn't work in my browser either (firefox).. thanks – Ella Sharakanski Sep 23 '14 at 22:02
  • I don't know why it is working in jsfiddle though... I'll keep investigating. – tfrascaroli Sep 25 '14 at 18:26
  • Allright, I have the final solution. Turns out @Jmh2013 was right, there is a default margin applied to the body. Adding margin: 0px; to the body in css fixes the problem. – tfrascaroli Sep 26 '14 at 12:11
  • Thank you, see my edit to the question – Ella Sharakanski Oct 2 '14 at 0:36
9

When using percentage widths the margin, padding and border are not included in the calculation. So you want to be sure all of those are set to 0 on the corresponding elements.

margin: 0;
padding: 0;
border: none;

Alternatively, you could use the box-sizing property which will make the calculation include padding and border. Then you would only have to account for the margins elsewhere.

box-sizing: border-box;
  • Not what he's asking. He has no margins, paddings or borders set in his css. See here jsfiddle.net/u3r2bm47 – tfrascaroli Sep 23 '14 at 19:55
  • This doesn't work. Both ways :( – Ella Sharakanski Sep 23 '14 at 20:25
  • I want the position to be fixed so the header remains when the page is scrolled. – Ella Sharakanski Sep 23 '14 at 22:06
  • hmm. That is not easily done and I doubt there will be a clean cross browser solution. Could you just set the width on the header instead of using percentage? If you need it responsive, you could use Javascript to check the width of the main section and set it to be equal.. Kinda hacky.. but it would work. – Jmh2013 Sep 24 '14 at 1:03
  • 2
    Because when you set the position to fixed, it takes that element out of the flow so it no longer is constrained by any other elements. Its only container is now the viewport and all others no longer exist as far as it is concerned. Here is the W3C documentation. Might be worth a quick read. – Jmh2013 Sep 24 '14 at 13:01
0

Another way is to use overflow: hidden; for parent div and set width:100%; for the child element. This way, more width will be hidden.

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