5

I want to write, in C (no particolar flavour, lets say c11) a generic, global const array of struct, like the following pseudocode:

void * generic[] ={&(struct a va),&(struct b vb)};

Now I want to create a function that, given the id of the position of desired struct (I'm planning to use a const for every id, hardcoded), will copy it.

Because that copy() also is generic (accepts a void * as destination) it would need to know the strict size, witch may be specified by caller (a lot of error prone, he already need to provide the target structure and the right id) or i will also maintain a parallel array of correct sizeof for every structure.

Is there a way to automate at compile time the initialization of sizeof array? Or even implement some sort of trick to let the user specify just pass the pointer to struct without its id, without having to write a specialized get_struct_x()?

No dynamic allocation (alloc(), local variable are fine) allowed, all struct and generic array content is known at compile time.

Sorry for my bad explanation, feel free to improve/correct it.

Edit for clarification: i need to deep copy a know struct type from an array where there are stored many struct type, but the same type never repeat itself. And I need to do it from a generic get function witch will be called from different thread, so before and after the copy will lock a mutex, and I want to keep all the locking and casting code in one point, to minimize debug and create more effective test.

  • I think your question is, "Can I write a function which takes an array of structs and an index and struct destination address as input -- such that the specific struct is bound 'somewhere else'?" – Brian Cain Sep 23 '14 at 22:06
  • 1
    "Is there a way to automate at compile time the initialization of sizeof array?" the only mechanism that's available to you is the preprocessor. It's the most common utility used for abstracting this kind of feature. – Brian Cain Sep 23 '14 at 22:07
  • Is it an option to store the size of each struct inside itself? I.e., add a member int mySize as the first member in each struct, and set it (in runtime) to x.mySize = sizeof(struct x). – usr2564301 Sep 23 '14 at 22:09
  • 1
    Or make the void*array a struct container array, witch cointains size and void pointer. Still need the developer to pay attention on the size and struct dependency, but a lot less error prone and still static initialized. Any idea about the struct to id map generation? – Lesto Sep 23 '14 at 22:14
  • I'm likely utterly lost. The sizeof what? Contrary to the description in the question, the non-const array of non-const void * ? The size of the array is trivial sizeof(generic)/sizeof(*generic) The size of each entity who's only path to glory is via a void* is not available. You could have an array of struct { void* p; size_t len } and properly populate the elements with instance address and sizeof(instance-type), but thats the only way out I see. Even then, there is no short-path to sizeof (insert something here) that will give you an immediate size of the pointed-to-data. – WhozCraig Sep 23 '14 at 22:14
3

Without having to modify the underlying data structures, this is the only method I can see where this will be fairly manageable. Each entry in your array is not a void*, but rather a struct that contains an void* (to the element) and a size_t (sizeof data for that element):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct Entry
{
    size_t len;
    void const *elem;
} Entry;

#define ELEM_ENTRY(x)   { sizeof(x), &(x) }

struct A
{
    int a1;
    long a2;
} a;

struct B
{
    float b1;
    char b2[6];
} b;

struct C
{
    unsigned int c1;
    double c2[5];
} c;

Entry generic[] =
{
    ELEM_ENTRY(a),
    ELEM_ENTRY(b),
    ELEM_ENTRY(c)
};
size_t generic_n = sizeof(generic)/sizeof(*generic);


int main()
{
    for (size_t i=0; i<generic_n; ++i)
        printf("[%zu] = %zu\n", i, generic[i].len);
}

Output

[0] = 8
[1] = 12
[2] = 44

I think that's what you're trying to do. if not, I'll drop this answer. Note that this will likely not work how you want it to if the element is a pointer type (but it will work how you want it to if it is a native array type). So be careful.

  • sorry to remove your accepeted answer, but see my own answer that do some more trick using X macro – Lesto Sep 24 '14 at 19:15
1

a friend of mine [s]without stackoverflow account[/s] (@Francesco) has re-elaborated the @WhozCraig answer adding the (very old) X macro (thanks to the great article by Randy Meyers) to build the generic struct array AND the enum witch help to access the array's struct leaving the user to edit only one spot;

going back to work I've told him i would like to try to make the specific struct getter (as there will be NO REPEATED STRUCT TYPE in the array. if you get it wrong, compile time error, so at the end of the day you will bend your head while developing, but once compile it will be more robust), so we would have compilation check on the type of the requested struct; back home he had already implemented it. KUDOS!

Then again I've lost some time on it and make to make the developer just have to type one time the struct, to prevent misalignment on that side; this has been the beginning of an optimization spiral;

  • because of specialized get and put, no more need of size array, so removed the generic struct
  • no initialized structure needed, we use "anonymous" struct initialization
  • because "anonymous" initialization, it is harder to directly access the structure
  • direct access require knowledge of the system, with lead to awareness
  • code it more readable
  • easy to export GENERIC_TABLE and structure definition on external independent file
  • #ifdef on GENERIC_TABLE works fine, move it to external header to increment readability
  • no dynamic initialization needed outside local variable (no garbage, embedded friendly)
  • extremely easy to use

cost

  • maybe a bit preprocessor bloated?
  • seems a lot OOP xD
  • you may call get and put with uninitiated pointer

TL;DR: here the full compiling code and basic example:

#include <memory.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

/* BEGIN: just some struct to test, fell free to move them on external header file */
struct A
{
    int a1;
    long a2;
};

struct B
{
    float b1;
    char b2[6];
};

struct C
{
    unsigned int c1;
    double c2[5];
};
/* END: just some struct to test, fell free to move them on external header file */

/* this macro will create the right X macro element, and also initiliaze the "anonymous" struct */
#define ADD_STRUCT_TO_ARRAY(xu) X(xu, &(struct xu){})SEP

/* BEGIN: add or remove your own struct here! 
 * fell free to move them on external header file 
 * just need to pass struct name without "struct" to ADD_STRUCT_TO_ARRAY macro */
#define GENERIC_TABLE \
    ADD_STRUCT_TO_ARRAY(A) \
    ADD_STRUCT_TO_ARRAY(B) \
    ADD_STRUCT_TO_ARRAY(C)
/* END: add or remove your own struct here! */

/* here we initialize the enum, where the type of the struct is the key, and its position in the array the value */
#define SEP ,
#define X(a,b) a
enum STRUCT {
    GENERIC_TABLE
};
#undef X

/* here we initalize the array of pointer to the structure */
#define X(a,b) b
void * const generic[] =
{
    GENERIC_TABLE
};
#undef X
#undef SEP

/* here we create all the getter function. add here your array locking code */
#define SEP ;
#define X(a,b) void get_##a(struct a * dest){memcpy(dest, generic[a], sizeof(struct a) );} 
GENERIC_TABLE
#undef X
#undef SEP

/* here we create all the putter function. add here your array locking code */
#define SEP ;
#define X(a,b) void put_##a(struct a * source){memcpy(generic[a], source, sizeof(struct a) );}
GENERIC_TABLE
#undef X
#undef SEP

/*run, code, run!*/
int main()
{
    struct A a_copy;
    struct B b_copy;
    struct C c_copy;

    get_A(&a_copy);
    get_B(&b_copy);
    get_C(&c_copy);

    printf("STRUCTURE IN ARRAY BEFORE INITIALIZATION\n");
    printf("A = %d\n", a_copy.a1);
    printf("B = %f\n", b_copy.b1);
    printf("C = %x\n", c_copy.c1);

    a_copy.a1 = -1;
    b_copy.b1 = 2.3;
    c_copy.c1 = 3;

    printf("STRUCTURE CHANGED TO\n");
    printf("A = %d\n", a_copy.a1);
    printf("B = %f\n", b_copy.b1);
    printf("C = %x\n", c_copy.c1);

    printf("STRUCTURE SAVED\n");
    put_A(&a_copy);
    put_B(&b_copy);
    put_C(&c_copy);

    get_A(&a_copy);
    get_B(&b_copy);
    get_C(&c_copy);

    printf("STRUCTURE LOADED\n");
    printf("A = %d\n", a_copy.a1);
    printf("B = %f\n", b_copy.b1);
    printf("C = %x\n", c_copy.c1);

    a_copy.a1 = 1000;
    b_copy.b1 = -50.576;
    c_copy.c1 = 700;

    printf("STRUCTURE CHANGED TO\n");
    printf("A = %d\n", a_copy.a1);
    printf("B = %f\n", b_copy.b1);
    printf("C = %x\n", c_copy.c1);

    get_A(&a_copy);
    get_B(&b_copy);
    get_C(&c_copy);

    printf("STRUCTURE RELOADED WITHOUT SAVING\n");
    printf("A = %d\n", a_copy.a1);
    printf("B = %f\n", b_copy.b1);
    printf("C = %x\n", c_copy.c1);


    return 0;
}
0

I would make the size of the struct the first element in every struct. So you have

struct a
{
   size_t size;
   int a1;
   double a2;
   // ... 
};

struct b
{
   size_t size;
   char b1[20];
   float b2;
   // ... 
};

Any time you create a struct, be sure to initialize the size, e.g.

struct a *aptr = malloc( sizeof(struct a) );
aptr->size = sizeof(struct a);
aptr->a1 = 3;
aptr->a2 = 100.5;

struct b someB = { sizeof(struct b), "hello", 1.0 };

Then, in the copy routine, you can cast the void * to a size_t * to get the size of the struct, since you know that every struct will have the size as the first element.

  • I generally like this approach better than the other two answers, but unfortunately the OP explicitly stated that malloc() is not allowed for the solution. So no +1 :-( – cmaster Sep 24 '14 at 19:24

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