32

How do I check to see if a URL exists without pulling it down? I use the following code, but it downloads the whole file. I just need to check that it exists.

app.get('/api/v1/urlCheck/', function (req,res) {
    var url=req.query['url'];
    var request = require('request');
    request.get(url, {timeout: 30000, json:false}, function (error, result) {
        res.send(result.body);

    });

});

Appreciate any help!

1
  • 3
    You can do a HEAD request instead of a GET. Whatever module you're using there, I would imagine they'd offer a simple interface for it.
    – user1106925
    Sep 24, 2014 at 1:39

13 Answers 13

42

Try this:

var http = require('http'),
    options = {method: 'HEAD', host: 'stackoverflow.com', port: 80, path: '/'},
    req = http.request(options, function(r) {
        console.log(JSON.stringify(r.headers));
    });
req.end();
2
  • 2
    As of Jan 2020 the request package is in maintenance only and should no longer be used (nodesource.com/blog/express-going-into-maintenance-mode). Better go for alternatives. url-exists is based on request and therefor is also deprecated by now.
    – schlicki
    Mar 12, 2020 at 9:56
  • 13
    @schlicki , you are confusing npm request module with Node.JS's internal built-in http module's request function Jun 28, 2020 at 13:28
24

2021 update

Use url-exist:

import urlExist from 'url-exist';

const exists = await urlExist('https://google.com');

// Handle result
console.log(exists);

2020 update

request has now been deprecated which has brought down url-exists with it. Use url-exist instead.

const urlExist = require("url-exist");

(async () => {
    const exists = await urlExist("https://google.com");
    // Handle result
    console.log(exists)
})();

If you (for some reason) need to use it synchronously, you can use url-exist-sync.

2019 update

Since 2017, request and callback-style functions (from url-exists) have fallen out of use.

However, there is a fix. Swap url-exists for url-exist.

So instead of using:

const urlExists = require("url-exists")

urlExists("https://google.com", (_, exists) => {
    // Handle result
    console.log(exists)
})

Use this:

const urlExist = require("url-exist");
 
(async () => {
    const exists = await urlExist("https://google.com");
    // Handle result
    console.log(exists)
})();

Original answer (2017)

If you have access to the request package, you can try this:

const request = require("request")
const urlExists = url => new Promise((resolve, reject) => request.head(url).on("response", res => resolve(res.statusCode.toString()[0] === "2")))
urlExists("https://google.com").then(exists => console.log(exists)) // true

Most of this logic is already provided by url-exists.

8
  • LOL!! I am eagerly awaiting the 2021 version. @Richie you are awesome!
    – Shane
    Oct 27, 2020 at 23:21
  • That's an extensive answer, yet it does seem that url-exists doesn't handle well invalid or self signed certificates., I tried process.env["NODE_TLS_REJECT_UNAUTHORIZED"] = 0;
    – Semtex
    Nov 24, 2020 at 11:29
  • Lots of problems seem to resolve around resolving security certificates to access the website. If you experience this problem in Node.js, try opening an issue on github.com/node-fetch/node-fetch Jan 28, 2021 at 1:56
  • 1
    Change const urlExist = require("url-exist"); to let { default: urlExist } = await import("url-exist"); or import urlExist from "url-exist" and move that line into the async function. If we have const urlExist = require("url-exist");, it gives the "ERR_REQUIRE_ESM" error.
    – crxyz
    May 13, 2021 at 17:29
  • Updated the answer May 14, 2021 at 22:19
18

Thanks! Here it is, encapsulated in a function (updated on 5/30/17 with the require outside):

    var http = require('http'),
         url = require('url');

    exports.checkUrlExists = function (Url, callback) {
        var options = {
            method: 'HEAD',
            host: url.parse(Url).host,
            port: 80,
            path: url.parse(Url).pathname
        };
        var req = http.request(options, function (r) {
            callback( r.statusCode== 200);});
        req.end();
    }

It's very quick (I get about 50 ms, but it will depend on your connection and the server speed). Note that it's also quite basic, i.e. it won't handle redirects very well...

2
  • 1
    You should not use require inside a function body since it's synchronous.
    – Westy92
    May 30, 2017 at 2:45
  • 3
    Existing resource or URL can return statuses different from 200 and still be valid Aug 8, 2017 at 14:57
9

Simply use url-exists npm package to test if url exists or not

var urlExists = require('url-exists');

urlExists('https://www.google.com', function(err, exists) {
  console.log(exists); // true 
});

urlExists('https://www.fakeurl.notreal', function(err, exists) {
  console.log(exists); // false 
});
5
  • 1
    Much cleaner. Thanks for sharing!
    – Sebyddd
    Nov 22, 2017 at 23:51
  • 1
    Is there an option to use it with synchronous call Dec 4, 2017 at 9:21
  • @UlrichDohou I don't think so. because to check whether url exists or not you have to make a request to that url and that in turn would be async. If you simply want to check if url is semantically correct or not you can use use RegExp for the same Nov 15, 2018 at 6:12
  • 1
    @UlrichDohou: Check the answer below with an example to make it sync. stackoverflow.com/a/49182165/384884
    – Deejers
    Aug 19, 2019 at 14:35
  • 1
    This packages contains literally 8 lines of code. Everything else is tests, package description, license, readme and other stuff.
    – Gherman
    Feb 27, 2020 at 13:03
8

It seems a lot of people have recommended a library to use, but url-exist includes a dependency of a data fetching lib so here is a clone of it using all native node modules:

const http = require('http');
const { parse, URL } = require('url');

// https://github.com/sindresorhus/is-url-superb/blob/main/index.js
function isUrl(str) {
  if (typeof str !== 'string') {
    return false;
  }

  const trimmedStr = str.trim();
  if (trimmedStr.includes(' ')) {
    return false;
  }

  try {
    new URL(str); // eslint-disable-line no-new
    return true;
  } catch {
    return false;
  }
}

// https://github.com/Richienb/url-exist/blob/master/index.js
function urlExists(url) {
  return new Promise((resolve) => {
    if (!isUrl(url)) {
      resolve(false);
    }

    const options = {
      method: 'HEAD',
      host: parse(url).host,
      path: parse(url).pathname,
      port: 80,
    };

    const req = http.request(options, (res) => {
      resolve(res.statusCode < 400 || res.statusCode >= 500);
    });
    
    req.end();
  });
}

urlExists(
  'https://stackoverflow.com/questions/26007187/node-js-check-if-a-remote-url-exists'
).then(console.log);

This might also appeal to those who'd rather not install a dependency for a very simple purpose.

6

require into functions is wrong way in Node. Followed ES6 method supports all correct http statuses and of course retrieve error if you have a bad 'host' like fff.kkk

checkUrlExists(host,cb) {
    http.request({method:'HEAD',host,port:80,path: '/'}, (r) => {
        cb(null, r.statusCode >= 200 && r.statusCode < 400 );
    }).on('error', cb).end();
}
1
  • Not sure but this seems to be the neatest way to check for link errors!!!
    – peterb
    Sep 4, 2017 at 9:53
4

Take a look at the url-exists npm package https://www.npmjs.com/package/url-exists

Setting up:

$ npm install url-exists

Useage:

const urlExists = require('url-exists');

urlExists('https://www.google.com', function(err, exists) {
  console.log(exists); // true 
});

urlExists('https://www.fakeurl.notreal', function(err, exists) {
  console.log(exists); // false 
});

You can also promisify it to take advantage of await and async:

const util = require('util');
const urlExists = util.promisify(require('url-exists'));

let isExists = await urlExists('https://www.google.com'); // true
isExists = await urlExists('https://www.fakeurl.notreal'); // false

Happy coding!

0
2

Using the other responses as reference, here's a promisified version which also works with https uris (for node 6+):

const http = require('http');
const https = require('https');
const url = require('url');

const request = (opts = {}, cb) => {
  const requester = opts.protocol === 'https:' ? https : http;
  return requester.request(opts, cb);
};

module.exports = target => new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  let uri;

  try {
    uri = url.parse(target);
  } catch (err) {
    reject(new Error(`Invalid url ${target}`));
  }

  const options = {
    method: 'HEAD',
    host: uri.host,
    protocol: uri.protocol,
    port: uri.port,
    path: uri.path,
    timeout: 5 * 1000,
  };

  const req = request(options, (res) => {
    const { statusCode } = res;

    if (statusCode >= 200 && statusCode < 300) {
      resolve(target);
    } else {
      reject(new Error(`Url ${target} not found.`));
    }
  });

  req.on('error', reject);

  req.end();
});

It can be used like this:

const urlExists = require('./url-exists')

urlExists('https://www.google.com')
  .then(() => {
    console.log('Google exists!');
  })
  .catch(() => {
    console.error('Invalid url :(');
  });
2

I see in your code that you are already using the request library, so just:

const request = require('request');

request.head('http://...', (error, res) => {
  const exists = !error && res.statusCode === 200;
});
2

If you're using axios, you can fetch the head like:

const checkUrl = async (url) => {
  try {
    await axios.head(fullUrl);
    return true;
  } catch (error) {
    if (error.response.status >= 400) {
      return false;
    }
  }
}

You may want to customise the status code range for your requirements e.g. 401 (Unauthorized) could still mean a URL exists but you don't have access.

1

my awaitable async ES6 solution, doing a HEAD request:

// options for the http request
let options = {
    host: 'google.de',
    //port: 80,  optional
    //path: '/'  optional
}

const http = require('http');

// creating a promise (all promises a can be awaited)
let isOk = await new Promise(resolve => {
    // trigger the request ('HEAD' or 'GET' - you should check if you get the expected result for a HEAD request first (curl))
    // then trigger the callback
    http.request({method:'HEAD', host:options.host, port:options.port, path: options.path}, result =>
        resolve(result.statusCode >= 200 && result.statusCode < 400)
    ).on('error', resolve).end();
});

// check if the result was NOT ok
if (!isOk) 
    console.error('could not get: ' + options.host);
else
    console.info('url exists: ' + options.host);
1

Currently request module is being deprecated as @schlicki pointed out. One of the alternatives in the link he posted is got:

const got = require('got');

(async () => {
    try {
        const response = await got('https://www.nodesource.com/');
        console.log(response.body);
        //=> '<!doctype html> ...'
    } catch (error) {
        console.log(error.response.body);
        //=> 'Internal server error ...'
    }
})();

But with this method, you will get the whole HTML page in the reponse.body. In addition got may have many more functionalities you may not need. That's I wanted to add another alternative I found to the list. As I was using the portscanner library, I could use it for the same aim without downloading the content of the website. You may need to use the 443 port as well if the website works with https

var portscanner = require('portscanner')

// Checks the status of a single port
portscanner.checkPortStatus(80, 'www.google.es', function(error, status) {
    // Status is 'open' if currently in use or 'closed' if available
    console.log(status)
})

Anyway, the most close approach is url-exist module as @Richie Bendall explains in his post. I just wanted to add some other alternative

-1

danwarfel's answer got me some of the way there but it's still not quite right: it leaks memory, doesn't follow redirects, doesn't support https (likely what you want) and doesn't actually answer the question - it just logs headers! Here's my version:

import * as https from "https";

// Return true if the URL is found and returns 200. Returns false if there are
// network errors or the status code is not 200. It will throw an exception
// for configuration errors (e.g. malformed URLs).
//
// Note this only supports https, not http.
//
async function isUrlFound(url: string, maxRedirects = 20): Promise<boolean> {
  const [statusCode, location] = await new Promise<[number?, string?]>(
    (resolve, _reject) => {
      const req = https.request(
        url,
        {
          method: "HEAD",
        },
        response => {
          // This is necessary to avoid memory leaks.
          response.on("readable", () => response.read());
          resolve([response.statusCode, response.headers["location"]]);
        },
      );
      req.on("error", _err => resolve([undefined, undefined]));
      req.end();
    },
  );

  if (
    statusCode !== undefined &&
    statusCode >= 300 &&
    statusCode < 400 &&
    location !== undefined &&
    maxRedirects > 0
  ) {
    return isUrlFound(location, maxRedirects - 1);
  }
  return statusCode === 200;
}

Minimally tested but it seems to work.

2
  • 1. I agree with your method of avoiding external imports, fixing memory leaks, and your code is much more robust - but there is no need for the snark which has unfortunately led to this post being downvoted in spite of possibly being the best answer. 2. Note that your code uses TypeScript which may not be something that everyone will recognize. Apr 7, 2022 at 16:15
  • You can easily convert it to JavaScript by removing the type annotations (either manually or e.g. in the Typescript Playground).
    – Timmmm
    Apr 8, 2022 at 11:14

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