9

There's lots of stuff on this already. They all seem to suggest that all you need to do is call free for each time you call malloc, and probably free the "pointer of pointers" last - so you don't end up referencing that memory after it's been released

For example, if I have

int** myPtr

Then I just need to

free(myPtr[j])

for each j, before finally releasing the pointer of pointers

free(myPtr)

Cool. I've done this a few times in my program, and it seems to work just fine - except in one case. I've tried to figure out what's different about this case, and I was able to replicate the symptom in a minimal program.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <stdlib.h>

signed char** getPtr()
{
    unsigned char n = 10;
    unsigned char k = 2;

    signed char** myPtr = (signed char**)malloc(n*sizeof(signed char));
    if (myPtr == NULL) {return NULL;}

    for (unsigned char i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        myPtr[i] = (signed char*)malloc(k*sizeof(signed char)); 
        if (myPtr[i] == NULL) {return NULL;}
    }

    for (unsigned char j = 0; j < n; j++)
    {
        for (unsigned char k = 0; k <= 1; k++)
        {
            myPtr[j][k] = 42; 
        }
    }

    return myPtr; 

}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    signed char** potato = getPtr();
    if (potato != NULL)
    {
        for (unsigned char j = 0; j < 10; j++)
        {
            free(potato[j]);
        }
        free(potato); 
    }
    return 0;
}
8
  • 5
    Is this a C question, or a C++ question. These are two different languages and the correct answer depends on that difference. Sep 24, 2014 at 4:24
  • I'm currently working with a project composed of C++ files, but if the answer is different for C, I'd like to know that too. Sep 24, 2014 at 4:26
  • 3
    In C++ it is preferable to not use the malloc family of functions, there are better options.
    – M.M
    Sep 24, 2014 at 4:38
  • 3
    Pick one language and stick with it. If you are using C++, then malloc family functions or arrays are just plain wrong. Get a good C++ book. I wonder where people keep acquiring this idea that it's OK to use arrays or malloc in C++, or that "C/C++" is an entity for crying out loud. Is it peddled by illegal street dealers or what? Sep 24, 2014 at 12:37
  • @n.m. Crappy & outdated education system would be my guess Sep 25, 2014 at 9:03

6 Answers 6

11

Your immediate problem is the following line:

signed char** myPtr = (signed char**)malloc(n*sizeof(signed char));

This is wrong because it allocates enough space for n characters. Instead, it should be:

signed char** myPtr = (signed char**)malloc(n*sizeof(signed char*));
//                                                              ^
//                                                      char POINTER

The size of a char is generally less than the size of a pointer but, even if it weren't, you should be using the right type. In fact, I tend to prefer the following form so that I don't have to repeat the type (repetition has the possibility that I may change one in the future, forgetting the other):

signed char** myPtr = (signed char**) malloc (n * sizeof (*myPtr));

Beyond that, you should consider which language you're actually coding for. While C and C++ share quite a bit of basic stuff, they are in no way the same language, and how you write your code depends on which one you're targeting.

Let's cover C first. In that language, you shouldn't cast the return value from malloc because it can hide certain subtle errors that are not fun to debug. Dropping the cast gives you:

signed char **myPtr = malloc (n * sizeof (*myPtr));

Additionally, since sizeof (char) (naked, signed and unsigned) is always one, whenever you see yourself multiplying by that, it's easier to just drop the multiplication. Combining that with the previous guideline allows you to turn:

myPtr[i] = (signed char*)malloc(k*sizeof(signed char));

into the much more readable:

myPtr[i] = malloc (k);

Now, if you're coding for C++, there are additional things to look into.

In C++, it's more acceptable to use the new and delete aspects of the language rather than the legacy C stuff like malloc and free. The guidelines you've already mentioned (ensuring you have a delete for each new) still hold, but there's the added complication of ensuring you use delete[] when freeing arrays of items.

That's not to say malloc and free won't work; they're still very much part of the C++ language specification. It's just that the C++ way of doing things can be much more powerful in that it can both allocate and initialise objects in one hit, and raise exceptions on out-of-memory, meaning you don't have to pepper your code with NULL checks.

In addition, C++ provides, in its standard library, a great many collections which make handling groups of things a lot easier than the use of raw arrays. One of these is a vector, basically a resizable array, and you should consider using it in situation where you may have previously used arrays.

The code you've shown would be much easier to implement as a vector of strings (C++ strings, not those puny C ones). And, in fact, I'd consider going one step further and actually encapsulating the entire data structure into its own class, hiding the fact that it uses vectors at all.

If you do that, and provide all the setter/getter methods that you need, you can later replace the entire underlying data structure without affecting the code that uses it.

12
  • 1
    @user2864293, if you don't include the correct header and your pointers are a different size to your integers, you can get unexpected results.
    – paxdiablo
    Sep 24, 2014 at 4:26
  • 5
    The right way to do C++ is "it's 2014 for Pete's sake, use std::vector already" and I'm sick of leaving this comment under every other C++ question that has "array" in it. I guess I could find a good question that has an accepted answer to this effect and just close 'em all as duplicates, would that be a right move? Sep 24, 2014 at 13:52
  • 1
    There are two unfortunate problems with answering questions like that. A suggestion to use std::vector would not answer a question about malloc, which breaks the rules of this site. And an answer about malloc would perpetuate the usage of malloc. See? Whichever way I answer, I only make things worse. So I comment, but comments are not really effective. Sep 24, 2014 at 20:17
  • 2
    And this is why leaving such comments is useful: it has led to the improvement of this answer! Sep 25, 2014 at 9:05
  • 1
    @Lightness: Engrish! I think I'm offended. No, not really, looking through your edits, I'm almost ashamed it was that bad. Thanks :-)
    – paxdiablo
    Sep 25, 2014 at 9:39
5

You're not allocating enough space for your pointer to pointers. This:

signed char** myPtr = (signed char**)malloc(n*sizeof(signed char));

should be:

signed char** myPtr = malloc(n*sizeof(signed char*));

You also would leak memory here if malloc would fail:

for (unsigned char i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    myPtr[i] = (signed char*)malloc(k*sizeof(signed char)); 
    if (myPtr[i] == NULL) {return NULL;}
}

I'm kind of assuming you want the C version of this code not fully portable to C++. There's probably a more appropriate way of accomplishing the same thing in C++ for what you really want to do.

3
  • @AlexReynolds the question is also tagged c++
    – quantdev
    Sep 24, 2014 at 4:21
  • @AlexReynolds and if this is to run on both C++ and C as the OP has for language tags?
    – WhozCraig
    Sep 24, 2014 at 4:21
  • It probably shouldn't be tagged C++. Sep 24, 2014 at 4:23
4

You need to allocate space for n pointers of signed char, not for n signed char :

signed char** myPtr = (signed char**)malloc(n*sizeof(signed char*));
                                                               ^^^
3

You should use:

signed char** myPtr = (signed char**)malloc(n*sizeof(signed char*));
                                                                ^^ The missing *

instead of

signed char** myPtr = (signed char**)malloc(n*sizeof(signed char));

Otherwise, you are not allocating enough memory for the pointers.

Of course, you should not cast the return value of malloc. It's known to cause problems. See Specifically, what's dangerous about casting the result of malloc? for more details.

Use:

signed char** myPtr = malloc(n*sizeof(signed char*));
1

In getPtr you:

// 1 byte
malloc n*sizeof(signed char)

But you are storing a pointer to a signed char, which is 32 or 64 bits, 4 or 8 bytes.

You could fix it with:

signed char*  zz;
signed char** myPtr = (unsigned char)malloc(n*sizeof(zz));
1

The easiest way is to use a true 2D array, not just an array of pointers to arrays. You can allocate your 2D array like this:

signed char (*myPtr)[k] = malloc(n*sizeof(*myPtr));

With this allocation, you do not need a loop to malloc() line arrays. You can directly use your 2D array like this:

for (unsigned char j = 0; j < n; j++)
{
    for (unsigned char i = 0; i < k; i++)
    {
        myPtr[j][i] = 42; 
    }
}

Note that there is no change in how you access the array elements, even though the memory layout is quite a bit different. But, since you allocated your memory in a single large block, you can also deallocate it in one free() call:

free(myPtr);

It really pays off to learn C's pointer to array syntax.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.