10

I am wondering if there is a more efficient route to take here. Using AspNet.Identity I would like to allow the user to sign in to the same text box using either their UserName or Email. I went ahead and addressed this issue in the AccountController Login ActionResult. I run the check before calling:

var result = await SignInManager.PasswordSignInAsync(model.UserName, model.Password, model.RememberMe, shouldLockout: true);

The Check:

//TODO: determine if there is a more efficient way to allow user to login either with Email || UserName
if (model.UserName.Contains("@"))
{
    using (var context = new ApplicationDbContext())
    {
        model.UserName = (context.Users.Any(p => p.Email == model.UserName)) ?
          context.Users.SingleOrDefault(p => p.Email == model.UserName).UserName :
          model.UserName;
    }
}

My concerns here are two fold:

  1. Is their a more efficient practical way to do this.
  2. Am I introducing any new security risks or performance risks by doing it this way?

I am including the entire ActionResult below for reference.

//
// POST: /Account/Login
[HttpPost]
[AllowAnonymous]
[ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
public async Task<ActionResult> Login(LoginViewModel model, string returnUrl)
{
    if (!ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        return View(model);
    }

    //TODO: determine if there is a more efficient way to allow user to login either with Email || UserName
    if (model.UserName.Contains("@"))
    {
        using (var context = new ApplicationDbContext())
        {
            model.UserName = (context.Users.Any(p => p.Email == model.UserName)) ?
              context.Users.SingleOrDefault(p => p.Email == model.UserName).UserName :
              model.UserName;
        }
    }

    // This doesn't count login failures towards account lockout
    // To enable password failures to trigger account lockout, change to shouldLockout: true
    var result = await SignInManager.PasswordSignInAsync(model.UserName, model.Password, model.RememberMe, shouldLockout: true);
    switch (result)
    {
        case SignInStatus.Success:
            return RedirectToLocal(returnUrl);
        case SignInStatus.LockedOut:
            return View("Lockout");
        case SignInStatus.RequiresVerification:
            return RedirectToAction("SendCode", new { ReturnUrl = returnUrl, RememberMe = model.RememberMe });
        case SignInStatus.Failure:
        default:
            ModelState.AddModelError("", "Invalid login attempt.");
            return View(model);
    }
}

related github issue #2 and #4

3
  • 2
    You can start by not checking if the entry has an @.
    – Zaid Amir
    Sep 24, 2014 at 5:35
  • @RedSerpent the reason I am checking if the entry has an @ is because I don't want to hit the database with a context.Users.Any LINQ query if I don't need to. Would hitting the database be a better solution? What issues do you have with checking for @? Sep 24, 2014 at 5:39
  • I had the same issue when I starts with Identity 1.0, I had to insert email and userName fields as same.
    – DSR
    Sep 24, 2014 at 8:27

1 Answer 1

14

There will be one security issue. You can get the username of another user if you know his email:

  1. write his email and wrong password
  2. then the system loads the corresponding user name, performs password validation which fails and returns the model with overwritten username

I would declare new variable instead of model.UserName reuse. And your query will be a little more effective if you use FirstOrDefault:

    var userName = model.UserName;
    using (var context = new ApplicationDbContext())
    {
       var user = context.Users.FirstOrDefault(p => p.Email == model.UserName);
       if (user != null)
       {
           userName = user.UserName;
       }
    }

var result = await SignInManager.PasswordSignInAsync(userName, model.Password, model.RememberMe, shouldLockout: true);
2
  • All valid points and I will certainly introduce some of those changes. However this is still using basically the same method I am already using, is there not a way that this is commonly accomplished with AspNet.Identity? Sep 24, 2014 at 17:47
  • 1
    @aaronmallen i don't know but i think that your solution is good enough.
    – Marian Ban
    Sep 24, 2014 at 17:59

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