2

I'm trying to build a __construct function for my class. This function should get All $_REQUEST values and store them in an array so they can be called later by id. The problem is that it doesn't store my variables and I don't know why.

Seeing this is my first "serious" attempt at a construct, it's most probably my stupidity. But I'd like to know what that is.

Class Regex {

private static $requests = array();

    function __construct() {
        foreach($_REQUEST as $key => $value) {
            self::$requests[$key] = array(
                'value' => $value,
                'status' => false,
                'errorList' => array()
            );
        }
    }



    public static function preg($key, $rules) {
        var_dump(self::$requests); // for test purpose
    }
}

The result of above is: array (size=0) empty.

  • 1
    Are you actually initialising the constructor? – andyroo Sep 24 '14 at 12:41
  • You'll need to call new Regex() in order to get the constructor invoked – user4066167 Sep 24 '14 at 12:43
  • 1
    why is this static if you will just manually make this class an initialized class? – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Sep 24 '14 at 12:52
3

the constructor of your Regex class is called upon creating a new regex object like so:

$regex = new Regex;

but you never create a Regex object so the constructor is never called, resulting in an empty $requests array.

4

Are you even calling the constructor? A constructor is only called when calling it either explicitly or via the new keyword).

PHP doesn't have anything like static constructors like Java has.

You have to ensure that the array is filled at the first access to preg() method:

public static function preg($key, $rules) {
    if (empty(self::$requests)) {
        foreach($_REQUEST as $key => $value) {
            self::$requests[$key] = array(
                'value' => $value,
                'status' => false,
                'errorList' => array()
            );
         }
    }
    var_dump(self::$requests); // for test purpose
}
  • hmm... I think you mean if (empty()).. otherwise, since self::$request is initialized as an empty array, this if (!empty()) won't ever return true; hence it will never be filled – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Sep 24 '14 at 12:51
  • 1
    @FélixGagnon-Grenier Initially had !self::$requests and forgot to strip the ! when adding empty(). Thanks :-) – bwoebi Sep 24 '14 at 12:51
2

You work with a static function. I think you don't call the construct method. The __construct function is called if you make a new instance.

$regex = new Regex;

If you call the static class for example Regex::preg the contructor is not called.

  • Hi stony you are right. And to keep my class static I inititate the class in the same file. This way I can keep calling it static without having to throw an extra line in there every time :) – Matt Sep 24 '14 at 12:47
-1

Expanding upon what bwoebi has answered, you can still get the intended results simply by adding a call to the static function preg from the constructor itself as you can see bellow:

That said, this is just adding more bloat without any real benefit.

Whilst this could come in useful in certain cases, and I only added it within this answer as a mean to display that your current structure could work with the simple addition of two simple lines, I would recommend going with @bwoebi's answer but to keep in mind that whilst the controller is initself not static, it does not in any way or form stop it from communicating with static methods.

PHP:

class Regex {

    private static $requests = array();

    function __construct(){
        if (empty(self::$requests)) {
            foreach($_REQUEST as $key => $value) {
                self::$requests[$key] = array(
                    'value' => $value,
                    'status' => false,
                    'errorList' => array()
                );
            }
        }
        self::preg();
    }

    public static function preg(){
        var_dump(self::$requests); // for test purpose
    }
}

$var = new Regex();
  • why post it then? – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Sep 24 '14 at 13:07
  • Because this site is not JUST about providing a clear answer but also about educating those who ask those answers about how such things work. Whilst this is not a good implementation compared to the original it does provide some insight as to how the controller works. I think I was relative clear in stating that this solution would work, that it would not be the best option in this case. However he should still be aware of it as it could come in useful in the future. – Cedric Le Varlet Sep 24 '14 at 13:10
  • please make this clear in your answer then :) you merely say that you add something to an existing answer, greatly copy pasting content, and do not even mention that this is not the best option, let alone explaining why this is not the greatest option. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Sep 24 '14 at 13:29

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