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I'm very new to elisp and I'm trying to adapt some existing code.

While looping over a table (generated by the orgmode function org-clock-get-table-data) I try the following:

((equal column "Project") (insert (cdr row)))

which yeilds the following in the Messages buffer:

cond: Wrong type argument: char-or-string-p, (#("Verify CalTime accruals for vacation/sick" 0 41   
(fontified t org-category #("Admin" 0 5 (fontified t org-category "Admin" org-category-position 32    
line-prefix nil wrap-prefix nil ...)) org-category-position 32 line-prefix #("*" 0 1 (face org-
hide)) wrap-prefix #("    " 0 4 (face org-indent)) ...)) nil 30 (("wps" . "Administration")))

The value that I want to insert is "Administration" so I try this

((equal column "Project") (insert (nth 4 row)))

which yeilds the following in the minibuffer

Wrong type argument, char-or-string-p, (("wps" . "Administration"))

Can someone tell me how I can insert the string "Administration"?

EDIT

Thanks Wes and Drew:

(cdar row)

Doing the above yields the first element of the complex list that I saw in the Messages buffer earlier:

Verify CalTime accruals for vaction/sick

row seems to be a complex list of lists:

((equal column "Project") (insert (car row))); yeilds ^B

((equal column "Project") (insert (cdr row)))
yields:
cond: Wrong type argument: char-or-string-p, (#("Verify CalTime accruals for vacation/sick" 0 41 
(fontified t org-category #("Admin" 0 5 (fontified t org-category "Admin" org-category-position 32 
line-prefix nil wrap-prefix nil ...)) org-category-position 32 line-prefix #("*" 0 1 (face org-
hide)) wrap-prefix #("    " 0 4 (face org-indent)) ...)) nil 30 (("wps" . "Administration")))

I think each "#" in the output above represents a list item. The fact that (nth 4 row) gives the error output shown above supports this and suggests that something like this might work:

((equal column "Project") (insert (nth 2 (nth 4 row))))
;yeilds wrong type argument, char-or-string-p, nil

So there is probably some function that I need to use to decode that 4th list item....

That 4th element is the orgmode property that has been assigned to the clocktable entry on the row we are parsing. This list of properties is defined in my .emacs:

(setq org-global-properties
;; WPS = Web Platform Services.  Time tracking for Google Sheet begun with CalTime Migration
            '(("wps_ALL". 
"Administration
ASG-Consulting
Chanc-Office-Website
")))
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    Confusingly, the Emacs Lisp syntax which begins #(" in one of your snippets actually doesn't represent a list, but a string with text properties. See the Info node "Text Props and Strings" in the Emacs Lisp manual for details on how it works. – Jon O. Sep 24 '14 at 17:36
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    For pulling apart more complex list structures, I find the cl-destructuring-bind and pcase macros to be very useful. (The latter is only in Emacs 24). Both let you extract parts of a list by writing down a kind of template of its structure, so the shape of the code resembles the shape of the data you are looking for. – Jon O. Sep 24 '14 at 17:38
  • Super-helpful! Thanks @Jon O. I'm trying to learn these functions. – Brian Wood Sep 24 '14 at 18:50
  • Thanks Lisp people! All of this info was helpful. I chose @Phils answer because (assoc) was key to the solution. For background I was adapting org-clocktable-write-default to flatten data so that it could be imported (CSV) to a google sheet. Here's the key line in the diff containing (assoc). org-clocktable-write-default held the answer. More code here that helped. – Brian Wood Sep 25 '14 at 21:19
3

Note that lists of the form (("wps" . "Administration") ("foo" . "bar")) are typically "alists", and so you may need to handle the situation where there is more than one item in your list.

Read: C-hig (elisp) Association Lists RET
and also: (elisp) Dotted Pair Notation

You may obtain a keyed item from an alist with (assoc) or (assq) depending on the form of equality needed for the test. Equivalent strings are not equal objects in elisp, so in this case you want assoc rather than assq.

That gives you the entire (KEY . VALUE) form as a result, and you obtain the cdr of that as usual; hence:

(let ((my-alist '(("wps" . "Administration") ("foo" . "bar"))))
  (cdr (assoc "wps" my-alist)))

yields: "Administration"

4

Instead of the assoc + cdr combination, you can also use assoc-default:

ELISP> (assoc-default "one" '(("one" . "two"))) => "two"

  • Huh, I never knew of this function. Useful. – Jon O. Sep 25 '14 at 5:34
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Lists are complex to think about in elisp. Until you've done enough of them that you stop thinking about them. Ha ha. But read up on the functions like car (picks the first element in a list) and cdr (picks the rest of the rest) to get started. And then you can chain things by combining letters in short sequences at least. So the answer you want is:

(cdar row)
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    To explain further: The car of (("wps" . "Administration")) is the first element of that list, ("wps" . "Administration"). And the cdr of that cons is "Administration". – Drew Sep 24 '14 at 15:38
  • Good addition Drew, thanks – Wes Hardaker Sep 24 '14 at 21:38

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