17

I am trying, in vain it seems, to be able to pass additional parameters back to the success callback method that I have created for a successful ajax call. A little background. I have a page with a number of dynamically created textbox / selectbox pairs. Each pair having a dynamically assigned unique name such as name="unique-pair-1_txt-url" and name="unique-pair-1_selectBox" then the second pair has the same but the prefix is different.

In an effort to reuse code, I have crafted the callback to take the data and a reference to the selectbox. However when the callback is fired the reference to the selectbox comes back as 'undefined'. I read here that it should be doable. I have even tried taking advantage of the 'context' option but still nothing. Here is the script block that I am trying to use:

<script type="text/javascript" language="javascript">
$j = jQuery.noConflict();
function getImages(urlValue, selectBox) {
    $j.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: $j(urlValue).val(),
        dataType: "jsonp",
        context: selectBox,
        success:function(data){
         loadImagesInSelect(data)
        } ,
        error:function (xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError) {
            alert(xhr.status);
            alert(thrownError);
        }

    });
}

function loadImagesInSelect(data) {
var select = $j(this);
select.empty();
$j(data).each(function() {
    var theValue = $j(this)[0]["@value"];
    var theId = $j(this)[0]["@name"];
    select.append("<option value='" + theId + "'>" + theValue + "</option>");
});
select.children(":first").attr("selected", true);

}    
</script>

From what I have read, I feel I am close but I just cant put my finger on the missing link. Please help in your typical ninja stealthy ways. TIA

****UPDATE**** Nick is a true Ninja. They should invent a new badge for that! His answer below does the trick. As he mentions it's 1.4 specific but I can live with that. Here is my final code that is working for any Ninjas in training (and my future reference):

<script type="text/javascript" language="javascript">
$j = jQuery.noConflict();
function getImages(urlValue, selectBox) {
    $j.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: urlValue+ '?callback=?',
        dataType: "jsonp",
        context: selectBox,
        success: jQuery.proxy(function (data) {
            var select = $j(this);
            select.empty();
            $j(data).each(function() {
                var theValue = $j(this)[0]["@value"];
                var theId = $j(this)[0]["@name"];
                select.append("<option value='" + theId + "'>" + theValue + "</option>");
            });
            select.children(":first").attr("selected", true);
        }, selectBox),
        error:function (xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError) {
            alert(xhr.status);
            alert(thrownError);
        }
    });
}
</script>
  • looks correct, are you getting any errors in the console? can you also paste the code where the call to getImages(urlValue, selectBox) is being made? – Anurag Apr 8 '10 at 20:26
  • no errors in the console. Just on the callback selectBox is undefined. The call to the method looks like this: getImages($j('[name=txt_registry_url]').val(),$j('[name=.selImageList]')) – dotnetgeek Apr 8 '10 at 23:54
  • maybe its too obvious, but does this selector work $j('[name=.selImageList]')) ? Based on the code, if nothing changes during the ajax call, selectBox should work as expected. Try logging selectBox at various points and check if the issue is it being undefined in the success callback, the loadImagesInSelect function, or maybe even getImages. – Anurag Apr 9 '10 at 0:15
  • sorry fat fingered. it should read: getImages($j('[name=txt_registry_url]').val(),$j('[name=selImageList]')). But as I mentioned, the getImages method is passed the proper reference and I can inspect the default values in the debugger to verify. The reference is there all the way until the callback then it becomes undefined. – dotnetgeek Apr 9 '10 at 0:34
  • Check out this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/18570951/885464 – Lorenzo Polidori Sep 2 '13 at 10:33
12

Updated: If you're using jQuery 1.4 use this to simplify things a bit:

success: jQuery.proxy(function (data) {
    var select = $j(this);
    select.empty();
    $j(data).each(function() {
        var theValue = $j(this)[0]["@value"];
        var theId = $j(this)[0]["@name"];
        select.append("<option value='" + theId + "'>" + theValue + "</option>");
    });
    select.children(":first").attr("selected", true);
}, selectBox)
  • Nick, This does not seem to work. I first tried with the anonymous method and still nothing. I can see the method getting invoked but cannot step into the anonymous method. So I changed it to use the external method so I could break on it. It then comes back undefined. – dotnetgeek Apr 8 '10 at 23:55
  • @dotnetgeek - How are you calling the external method? It should just be success: externalMethodName with a signature like this: function externalMethodName(data) – Nick Craver Apr 8 '10 at 23:57
  • @Nick, I updated the original code with how I currently have it setup. It looks like this: loadImagesInSelect(data, $j(this)). Wether I pass it the reference or not, $j(this) returns back a Window object. – dotnetgeek Apr 9 '10 at 0:29
  • @dotnetgeek - That's the part I'm trying to convey, you don't control which arguments are passed to that function, the format is always function(data, textStatus, XMLHttpRequest), but you can determine what this refers to inside that function by setting context: something, that something will be this when the function runs. – Nick Craver Apr 9 '10 at 0:32
  • When I do what you suggest, change the callbacck method format to: loadImagesInSelect(data) and change the loadImagesInSelect method to: function loadImagesInSelect(data) { var select = $j(this); select.empty(); $j(data).each(function() { var theValue = $j(this)[0]["@value"]; var theId = $j(this)[0]["@name"]; select.append("<option value='" + theId + "'>" + theValue + "</option>"); }); select.children(":first").attr("selected", true); } $(this)'s type is NOT the dropdown. In IE it shows as DispHTMLWindow2. In FF its a Window – dotnetgeek Apr 9 '10 at 0:42
22

This is what I did, and it also worked fine:

$.ajax('URL', {
    myCustomControl: selectBox,
    myCustomVariable: 'teste',
    data:
    {
       myData: 1
    },
    success: function (data, textStats, jqXHR) {
        myFunction(data, textStats, jqXHR, this.myCustomControl, this.myCustomVariable);
    }   
});

You can add controls and variables to the parameters of your ajax call.

  • 1
    tested in chrome, with jquery-1.11.2 seems like, you dont really need the object: function ajaxParameterTest(p1, p2) { $.ajax({ url: "/Download.aspx?status=true", success: function(data, status, jqXHR){ callbackFunction(data, status, jqXHR, p1, p2); }, dataType: "html", statusCode:{ 404: function(){ alert("you cannot retrieve data from the server right now.."); } } }); } – Henrik Jan 20 '15 at 8:02
12

Put this into your $.ajax parameters.

invokedata: {
    data1: "yourdata",
    data2: "moredata"
}

In the success function use it like this

this.invokedata.data1;
this.invokedata.data2;

Your $.ajax call and the success function must also be a part of the same object. Put your functions in an object and define them like this

function myObject {
    var getImage = function(..) { }
    var loadImagesInSelect = function(..) { }
}
  • can you tell me what you mean by: Your $.ajax call and the success function must also be a part of the same object? Also I do not see invokeData as a parameter on the jQuery site. Can you elaborate on the values? Do they need to be strings or can they be an object reference? – dotnetgeek Apr 9 '10 at 0:48
  • I have updated my answer. invokedata is stored in your object, not in jquery. Data can be anything. – Egor Pavlikhin Apr 9 '10 at 0:49
  • I was not able to get this working but @Nick's final answer seemed to work. Thanks for the help though. Your solution has given me a couple more ideas to try out to clean things up a bit. – dotnetgeek Apr 9 '10 at 1:35
  • 1
    Check this answer, which worked for me stackoverflow.com/questions/2542208/…. I was trying to do the same thing. – Egor Pavlikhin Apr 9 '10 at 2:17
3

this is Out of Scope

Just so you (or anyone else) understand(s)1, the reason that this was undefined in loadImagesInSelect() in your original example was because that function was under a different scope, and scopes don't "cascade" like that2.

When you specified a "context" of selectBox in your AJAX call, it set the context (this) for the functions given to "success" and "error". (It just so happens that they were both anonymous functions.) At this point, this is defined in both of these functions, as the value of selectBox. Now, in the function passed to "success", you call loadImagesInSelect(). When you call a function, it creates a new scope. In this scope, this will be window in non-strict mode and undefined in strict mode.


Put Graphically (in Strict Mode3):

// this = window (global scope)

$j = jQuery.noConflict();
function getImages(urlValue, selectBox) {

    // this = undefined (function scope level 1)

    $j.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: $j(urlValue).val(),
        dataType: "jsonp",
        context: selectBox,
        success: function(data) {

            // this = selectBox (function scope level 2)

            loadImagesInSelect(data);
        },
        error: function(xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError) {

            // this = selectBox (function scope level 2)

            alert(xhr.status);
            alert(thrownError);
        }
    });
}

function loadImagesInSelect(data) {

    // this = undefined (function scope level 3)

    var select = $j(this);
    select.empty();
    $j(data).each(function() {
        var theValue = $j(this)[0]["@value"];
        var theId = $j(this)[0]["@name"];
        select.append("<option value='" + theId + "'>" + theValue + "</option>");
    });
    select.children(":first").attr("selected", true);
}

$.proxy() is Redundant

The use of $.proxy() in your updated code is redundant. You use $.proxy() to get this to the function that was formerly called loadImagesInSelect(), but you moved that function up into "success" anyway (instead of calling it from within "success"). It already has access now to the value of this specified by "context".

You could remove the $.proxy() wrapper around your "success" function in your updated code and it would still work.

I know it's been years since you asked your question, but I hope this helps.


  1. I hope this doesn't come across as condescending; it's not meant to be.
  2. At least, not when you call a function, and not with context. If you define a function within a function (i.e. a closure), then any variables in the outer function will be available in the inner function. However, the outer function's context (the this variable) still isn't available in the inner function.
  3. Replace undefined with window for non-strict mode.
  4. Or the native Function.prototype.bind() in ECMAScript 5.
0

You can use indexValue attribute for passing :

var someData = "hello";

jQuery.ajax({
    url: "http://maps.google.com/maps/api/js?v=3",
    indexValue: {param1:someData, param2:"Other data 2", param3: "Other data 3"},
    dataType: "script"
}).done(function() {
    console.log(this.indexValue.param1);
    console.log(this.indexValue.param2);
    console.log(this.indexValue.param3);
}); 

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