1

I need to convert number into their minimal log2 +1, but I have a problem, that in 32-bit Ruby, log2(8) = 2.9999999999999996

The input (pos) and output (level) should be:

1 -> 1
2-3 -> 2
4-7 -> 3
8-15 -> 4
16-31 -> 5
and so on..

My formula:

pos = 8 
level = ( Math.log(pos,2) + 1 ).to_i
# 3 (wrong) in 32-bit Ruby
# 4 (correct) in 64-bit Ruby

Is there more way to prevent this from happening or is there any other formula that convert pos to correct level as shown above?

  • and yes, it only happened for certain number: 8, 64, 4096, 8192, 16777216, 67108864, 281474976710656, 2251799813685248, etc '___') i don't know why – Kokizzu Sep 25 '14 at 5:19
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    Floating point precision I'm afraid. Just the way the cookie crumbles. But it's nearly correct, no? – Bathsheba Sep 25 '14 at 5:21
  • No '___') 1 difference between 3 to 4 makes my another algorithm become faulty XD – Kokizzu Sep 25 '14 at 5:22
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    Well, it's that algorithm that's at fault. Floating points are difficult to work with. – Bathsheba Sep 25 '14 at 5:24
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    Your question is confusing. You seem to want the integer part of log plus 1. That is your particular problem. When asking a question here, extract the core/minimal part of the question. Ask for log, not log plus 1. – sawa Sep 25 '14 at 5:33
2
pos = 8
level = 0
until pos < 2
  level += 1
  pos /= 2
end
level + 1 #=> 4
1

Here's another interesting way to compute the floored logarithm for integers:

0.upto(Float::INFINITY).find{|e| x - base**e < base }
  • Although @sawa's answer should perform much better, because it does only one division for each potential exponent, whereas mine does an exponentiation for each one. – Patrick Oscity Sep 25 '14 at 6:01
-1

The maximum representable value with IEEE 754-2008 binary32 is (2−2**(−23)) × 2**127, so the base 2 log of a number stored in binary 32 is less than decimal 128. Since the round-off error is a small fraction of one, we can round to the nearest integer and see if 2 to that integer power equals the given number. If it does, return the integer power; else return nil, signifying that it is not a power of 2.

def log_2_if_integer(n)
  x = Math.log(n,2).round(0).to_i
  (2**x == n) ? x : nil
end

log_2_if_integer(4)   #=> 2
log_2_if_integer(512) #=> 9
log_2_if_integer(3)   #=> nil

In other words, because the log is less than 128, rounding error could not produce a value x such that 2**(x+m) == n for any (positive or negative) integer m != 0.

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    I think OP wants an answer even if it's not a power of 2: 8-15 -> 4. – Teepeemm Sep 25 '14 at 12:11
  • @Teepeemm, I have two things to say about your comment: 1. Isn't it pretty obvious that you could return a float rather than nil if the value is not a power of 2? 2. Neither of the other two answers even checked to see if the number was a power of 2. I'm not faulting them, as I'm sure they thought such a check was trivial, as it is. – Cary Swoveland Sep 25 '14 at 21:02
  • "the base 2 log of a number stored in binary 32 is not more than decimal 8". This isn't right: the largest number that can be stored in IEEE 754 binary32 format is close to 2^128, so its base-two log would be close to 128. I'm not sure I understand the relevance of the binary32 format to the question, either: doesn't Ruby use double-precision floats (binary64) under the hood? – Mark Dickinson Oct 3 '14 at 21:44
  • @MarkDickinson, thanks for pointing that out. I certainly messed that up, but it doesn't affect the validity of the method. The OP was specific about 32-bit Ruby. Please see my edit. – Cary Swoveland Oct 3 '14 at 22:53
  • I don't think it matters whether it's 32-bit or 64-bit Ruby: it'll be using the binary64 format either way. – Mark Dickinson Oct 4 '14 at 8:27

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