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I am doing homework and am stuck with a property that I need to make to not receive negative values.

I have this code for the property. How do I set the setter not to let the user set a negative value?

     public decimal Balance 
        { 
        get {return balance;}
        private set{ if (value >= 0) 
        {
            balance = value;
        }else if (value < 0)
        {
           ??????
        }
        }
    }        

This here is my Main() method:

  static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        BankAccountClass firstAccount = new BankAccountClass();
        int userInputAccountNumber = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
        firstAccount.addAccountNumber(userInputAccountNumber);

        Console.WriteLine(firstAccount.AccountNumber);


    }
4
  • 1
    imho it's best practice to only do trivial tasks in property accessors, non-trivial tasks such as check for nulls are more suited to a method which checks for null before assigning it to the property.
    – BLoB
    Sep 25, 2014 at 11:43
  • I did it with a method, but the teacher said that it is not the correct way. And all over the web, users are stating that it is better to use a method.
    – Henry Lynx
    Sep 25, 2014 at 11:49
  • Lecturers teach theory, professionals in the field teach practicality / readability / maintainability / common sense... Consider msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/w86s7x04.aspx there is an if statement, but what if the month is set as 13... nothing... well that's pants... invariably you want to do something if it is 13 (or null in your case) and the special method accessors of properties is not the best place to do it.
    – BLoB
    Sep 25, 2014 at 13:30
  • Also consider when a property is non-virtual and contains only a small amount of code, the execution environment may replace calls to accessors with the actual code of the accessors. This process is known as inlining, and it makes property access as efficient as field access, yet preserves the increased flexibility of properties.
    – BLoB
    Sep 25, 2014 at 13:41

3 Answers 3

8

You should probably throw an ArgumentOutOfRangeException:

 public decimal Balance 
 { 
    get { return balance; }
    private set
    {
       if (value < 0)
          throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Only positive values are allowed");

       balance = value;
    }
}   

But defaulting to 0, or doing nothing, can also be an option, depending on the exact requirements.

3
public decimal Balance 
{ 
    get {return balance;}
    private set
    { 
        if (value >= 0) 
        {
            balance = value;
        }
    }

Just do nothing if value is smaller than 0, or throw an ArgumentException

0

You could just return from the setter (you don't need to handle it) or if you want to handle it, throw an exception.

1
  • 1
    Just thinking about this on a deeper level... If you're talking about the balance of an account, from a real-word object point-of-view, external things don't set the 'balance'. They Add and Remove amounts that determine the Balance. So a better design in this case would be to have just the getter, and have Add and Subtract methods that will affect the private balance amount.
    – Ian
    Sep 25, 2014 at 11:41

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