10

I have seen GIT commit --amend in detached HEAD state. The question requires the answer to be more complex than needs be. I'd like to understand just how git commit --amend works in a normal HEAD situation.

  • I'll produce graphs for the the simple situation. Hold on. – jub0bs Sep 26 '14 at 0:47
  • How do you produce your graphs? I'm going to be teaching git to youth tomorrow. – Shaun Luttin Sep 26 '14 at 0:48
  • 1
    See github.com/Jubobs/gitdags – jub0bs Sep 26 '14 at 0:58
  • 1
    You need a TeX distribution. Have you heard of LaTeX? – jub0bs Sep 26 '14 at 2:04
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    Relatively steep :) Don't expect to get your graphs ready for tomorrow. There is a TeX.SX site that's proved very useful to me, though. – jub0bs Sep 26 '14 at 2:07
20

Assume that you're in a clean working state and that your repo looks as follows:

enter image description here

If you then run

git commit --amend

write a commit message, save and quit your editor, the following happens:

  1. Your staging area—which, if you haven't staged any new changes, will be identical to commit f42c5—is used to create a new commit: 31b8e. Its parent(s) will be the same as that(those) of the commit you're amending: f42c5.
  2. The master branch reference is moved to point to that new commit (31b8e).
  3. The HEAD reference follows master.

enter image description here

Note that the amended commit (f42c5) is now unreachable from any reference in your repo (hence its "transparent" style on my graph). It still lives in your repository's object database, but will eventually be deleted for good, when Git runs its periodic housekeeping, or if you trigger it explicitly by running git gc (garbage collection).


Addendum (based on Jason Baker's comment): Note that, as long as the amended commit, f42c5, still exists in your repo and you have a way of finding out its commit ID (for example, by fishing it out of the master branch's reflog), you can still check it out. Running

git checkout master # just to be sure that master is the current branch
git reset --hard f42c5

or (assuming you haven't, in the meantime, made any new commit on master, reset master, or otherwise moved the master branch reference)

git checkout master # just to be sure that master is the current branch
git reset --hard master@{1}

would put you in the following situation:

enter image description here

But now, commit 31b8e would become unreachable.


  • Can you get back to f42c5 by doing a checkout, or by going through the reflog? I admit that it would be a silly thing to do, but I'm curious if the old commit can be accessed at all – Jason Baker Sep 26 '14 at 0:59
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    @JasonBaker Yes, you can always check out the amended (now unreachable) commit, as long as it has hasn't been garbage collected, and you have a way of referring to it. – jub0bs Sep 26 '14 at 1:11
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    Heh, now the commands are not quite right, git reset always resets the current branch (which means HEAD must not be detached, too). Put the checkout master first, etc... – torek Sep 26 '14 at 1:19
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    @Jubobs How are you creating this beautiful graphs? They are great! – Sascha Wolf Sep 26 '14 at 10:24
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    @Zeeker Thanks :) I use a little LaTeX package called gitdags (available on GitHub) that I wrote on top of an awesome one called tikz. See also this example. – jub0bs Sep 26 '14 at 11:04
5

Say you just committed "B"

... --- A --- B
              ^
              |
            master
             HEAD

Amending "B" will create a parallel commit which becomes the new branch head.

        +---- B
        |
... --- A --- B'
              ^
              |
            master
             HEAD

B' is the commit resulting from a combination of the changes from B plus the changes you had staged when you issued the git commit --amend.

  • 2
    To build on this answer, B' will contain the combination of the changes from B, and any staged changes that you have sitting in your repo right now – Jason Baker Sep 26 '14 at 0:47
  • @Jason Baker, Added. – ikegami Sep 26 '14 at 0:50
0

According to my knowledge, ammend works thus:

For git commit --ammend works the changes to ammend must be into Stagging Area (SA)

  1. It makes git reset -- soft for bring back changes commited in the last commit (commit to ammend) to SA and move the index to previous commit (commit before commit to ammend). Everything keep how was before git commit command were used.
  2. It makes git add with all files to add to new commit ( it will be the ammended commit). The files to add are those were into SA before the git reset --soft was landed, after reset this files are keept into the WD, so it is necessary add them to SA for generate the ammended commit.
  3. Makes git commit. It will generate a new commit and hence a new id for ammended commit. For this, git commit --ammend should not be used with pushed commits

If you use --no-edit the comment is re-used in the ammended commit, else you must introduce a new comment (becouse it is a new commit and every commit need a comment).

For more info about Stagging Area and Working Directory, see Reset Demystified

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