11

I am trying to read all data present in the buffer of the Machine connected through TCP/IP but i don't know why i am not getting all data ,some data is getting Missed. Here is the code that i am using ..

using (NetworkStream stream = client.GetStream())
{
    byte[] data = new byte[1024];
    int numBytesRead = stream.Read(data, 0, data.Length);
    if (numBytesRead > 0)
    {
       string str= Encoding.ASCII.GetString(data, 0, numBytesRead);
    }
}

Please tell me what i am missing to get all the data from the machine. Thanks in advance..

  • any chance this can have anything to do with the fact that you're explicitly reading at most 1024 bytes? – decPL Sep 26 '14 at 11:35
  • @decPL Ok So how can i read all the data? – shubham Hegdey Sep 26 '14 at 11:36
  • 1
    What is exactly missing? Begin of the stream, end, or random bytes? Are you able recognize end of the stream from the byte sequence? Do you know expected length of the data? – Aik Sep 26 '14 at 11:40
  • @Aik It is missing random bytes.And data length is not known it can be anything? – shubham Hegdey Sep 26 '14 at 11:44
  • 1
    No, it cannot be anything. You need to define a protocol if you don't want to wait until the client closes the connection. Otherwise - keep reading until the client closes the connection. – CodeCaster Sep 26 '14 at 11:44
21

The problem with your code is that you will not get all the data if the data size is bigger than the buffer size (1024 bytes in your case) so you have to Read the stream inside the loop. Then you can Write all the data inside a MemoryStream until the end of the NetworkStream.


      string str;
      using (NetworkStream stream = client.GetStream())
      {
            byte[] data = new byte[1024];
            using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
            {

                int numBytesRead ;
                while ((numBytesRead = stream.Read(data, 0, data.Length)) > 0)
                {
                    ms.Write(data, 0, numBytesRead);


                }
               str = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(ms.ToArray(), 0, (int)ms.Length);
            }
        }
  • OK in str we will get data line by line right ? – shubham Hegdey Sep 26 '14 at 12:05
  • 1
    No, in str you will get the whole string which is stored in the NetworkStream the time you read it. – GeorgeChond Sep 26 '14 at 12:07
  • You mean to say that all the data available in the buffer .Am i right? – shubham Hegdey Sep 26 '14 at 12:10
  • Yes, you are right. – GeorgeChond Sep 26 '14 at 12:10
  • 3
    Be careful. This solution CLOSE connection after using section ends. – FoKycHuK Dec 24 '16 at 15:32
6

This example from MSDN: NetworkStream.DataAvailable shows how you can use that property to do so:

// Examples for CanRead, Read, and DataAvailable. 
// Check to see if this NetworkStream is readable. 
if(myNetworkStream.CanRead)
{
    byte[] myReadBuffer = new byte[1024];
    StringBuilder myCompleteMessage = new StringBuilder();
    int numberOfBytesRead = 0;

    // Incoming message may be larger than the buffer size. 
    do{
         numberOfBytesRead = myNetworkStream.Read(myReadBuffer, 0, myReadBuffer.Length);

         myCompleteMessage.AppendFormat("{0}", Encoding.ASCII.GetString(myReadBuffer, 0, numberOfBytesRead));

    }
    while(myNetworkStream.DataAvailable);

    // Print out the received message to the console.
    Console.WriteLine("You received the following message : " +
                                 myCompleteMessage);
}
else
{
     Console.WriteLine("Sorry.  You cannot read from this NetworkStream.");
}
  • And what does this example do? Is NetworkStream.DataAvailable reliable for OP's purpose? When does it become false? – CodeCaster Sep 26 '14 at 11:48
  • I becomes false when no more data is in the socket, and why would not be reliable? – dariogriffo Sep 26 '14 at 11:51
  • No. NetworkStream.DataAvailable being false just indicates there's no data in the receiver's receive buffer. It doesn't mean that the sender is done sending, so it can't be used to implement a protocol and it won't solve OP's problem. – CodeCaster Sep 26 '14 at 11:54
  • 2
    Read yourself, you are saying I'm right, and he asked to read all the data in the stream. You are going one step beyond and I agree with you, he needs to implement a protocol, but that is not the question here, he ask how to read all the data in the stream. – dariogriffo Sep 26 '14 at 11:56
  • 1
    I highly doubt that is what OP wants, but you're right. – CodeCaster Sep 26 '14 at 12:01
2

Try this code:

using (NetworkStream stream = client.GetStream())
    {
         do
         {
           Thread.Sleep(20);
         } while (!stream.DataAvailable);

         if (stream.DataAvailable && stream.CanRead)
         {
              Byte[] data = new Byte[1024];
              List<byte> allData = new List<byte>();

              do
              {
                    int numBytesRead = stream.Read(data,0,data.Length);

                    if (numBytesRead == data.Length)
                    {
                         allData.AddRange(data);
                    }
                    else if (numBytesRead > 0)
                    {
                         allData.AddRange(data.Take(bytes));
                    }                                    
               } while (stream.DataAvailable);
          }
    }

Hope this helps, it should prevent that you miss any data sended to you.

1

Try this:

 private string GetResponse(NetworkStream stream)
    {
        byte[] data = new byte[1024];
        using (MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            do
            {
                stream.Read(data, 0, data.Length);
                memoryStream.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
            } while (stream.DataAvailable);

            return Encoding.ASCII.GetString(memoryStream.ToArray(), 0, (int)memoryStream.Length);
        }
    }
0

TCP itself does not have any ways to define "end of data" condition. This is responsibility of application level portocol.

For instance see HTTP request description:

A client request (consisting in this case of the request line and only one header field) is followed by a blank line, so that the request ends with a double newline

So, for request end of data is determined by two newline sequences. And for response:

Content-Type specifies the Internet media type of the data conveyed by the HTTP message, while Content-Length indicates its length in bytes.

The response content size is specified in header before data. So, it's up to you how to encode amount of data transferred at once - it can be just first 2 or 4 bytes in the beginning of the data holding total size to read or more complex ways if needed.

0

for my scenario, the message itself was telling the length of subsequent message. here is the code

 int lengthOfMessage=1024;
 string message = "";
 using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
 {
      int numBytesRead;
      while ((numBytesRead = memStream.Read(MessageBytes, 0, lengthOfMessage)) > 0)
      {
            lengthOfMessage = lengthOfMessage - numBytesRead;
            ms.Write(MessageBytes, 0, numBytesRead);
      }
      message = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(ms.ToArray(), 0, (int)ms.Length);
 }
-1

Joining this question a bit late, but I was just wondering myself what the neatest way to do it was. When the protocol is not known.. And this is my conclusion

The while loops mentioned in previous answers do not work properly on NetworkStream, they fail and you get no data at all.

I have not tried the DataAvailable, and not knowing how it works I prefer my version which anyone can understand.

var ms = new MemoryStream();
byte[] data = new byte[1024];
int numBytesRead;

do
{
    numBytesRead = stream.Read(data, 0, data.Length);
    ms.Write(data, 0, numBytesRead);

} while (numBytesRead == data.Length);

var str = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(ms.ToArray());

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