In linux, I use ps2pdf to convert text file report to pdf in bash script.

To feed ps2pdf for ps file, I use paps command because of UTF8 encoding.

The problem is pdf file from ps2pdf is about 30 times bigger than ps file created from paps.

Previous, I used a2ps to convert text to ps and then fed to ps2pdf, and the pdf output from this is normal size and not big.

Is there any way to reduce the pdf size from paps and ps2pdf? Or what am I doing wrong?

The command I used is as below.

paps --landscape --font="Freemono 10" textfile.txt > textfile.ps
ps2pdf textfile.ps textfile.pdf

Thank you very much.

For ps2pdf, it is easiest to control output size is by designating paper size. An example command is:

ps2pdf -sPAPERSIZE=a4 -dOptimize=true -dEmbedAllFonts=true YourPSFile.ps
  • ps2pdf is the wrapper to ghostscript (ps2pdf is owned by ghostscript package)
  • with -sPAPERSIZE=something you define the paper size. Wondering about valid PAPERSIZE values? See [http://ghostscript.com/doc/current/Use.htm#Known_paper_sizes here]
  • -dOptimize=true let's the created PDF be optimised for loading
  • -dEmbedAllFonts=true makes the fonts look always nice

All of this is from : https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Ps2pdf

  • Thank you very much. Why then pdf file size is smaller if ps file created by a2ps? 2.3MB txt file becomes 7.3MB ps file from paps and 235MB pdf from this ps file. The same 2.3MB txt file becomes 1.4MB pdf file if txt file goes thru a2ps, where I did not use any of the options you suggested for the ps2pdf. I will try your suggested options on ps file created by paps to see if it drastically reduces the file size. Thank you very much. – user1026669 Sep 26 '14 at 20:17
  • I tried with your suggested flags, but it does not reduce the pdf file size drastically. The txt file size = 2.3MB, ps file size from paps = 7.3MB, and the pdf file size with all your suggested options = 234.9MB. I think that the ps2pdf is creating an image like txt and that is why the file size is so big. Thank you for your help. – user1026669 Sep 26 '14 at 21:32

I think he means the size on disk, rather than the size of the output media. The 'most likely' scenario normally is that the source contains a large DCT encoded image (JPEG) which is decoded and then compressed losslessly into the PDF file using something like flate.

But that can't be the case here, as its apparently only text. So the next most likely problem is that the text is being rasterised, which suggests some odd fonts in the PostScript, which is possible if you are using UTF-8 text, its probably constructing something daft like a CIDFont with TrueType descendant fonts.

However, since the version of Ghostscript isn't given, and we don't have a file to look at, its really impossible to tell. Older versions of the pdfwrite device did less well on creating optimal files, especially from CIDFonts.

Setting 'Optimize=true' won't actually do anything with the current version of pdfwrite, that's an Acrobat Distiller parameter we no longer implement. Older versions of Ghostscript did use it, but the output wasn't correctly Linearised.

The correct parameter for newer versions is '-dFastWebView' which is supposed to be faster when loading from the web if the client can deal with this format. Given the crazy way its specified, practically no viewer in the world does. However, the file is properly constructed in recent versions, so if you can find a viewer which supports it, you can use this (at the expense of making the PDF file slightly larger)

If you would like to post a URL to a PostScript file exhibiting problems I can look at it, but without it there's really nothing much I can say.

Update

The problem is the paps file, it doesn't actually contain any text at all, in a PostScript sense.

Each character is stored as a procedure, where a path is drawn and then filled. This is NOT stored in a font, just in a dictionary. All the content on the page is stored in strings in a paps 'language'. In the case of text this simply calls the procedure for the relevant glyph(s)

Now, because this isn't a font, the repeated procedures are simply seen by pdfwrite (and pretty much all other PostScript consumers) as a series of paths and fills, and that's exactly what gets written to the output in the PDF file.

Now normally a PDF file would contain text that looks like :

/Helvetica 20 Tf
(AAA) Tj

which is pretty compact, the font would contain the program to draw the 'A' so we only include it once.

The output from paps for the same text would look like (highly truncated) :

418.98 7993.7 m
418.98 7981.84 l
415.406 7984.14 411.82 7985.88 408.219 7987.04 c
...
... 26 lines omitted
...
410.988 7996.3 414.887 7995.19 418.98 7993.7 c
f
418.98 7993.7 m
418.98 7981.84 l
415.406 7984.14 411.82 7985.88 408.219 7987.04 c
...
... 26 lines omitted
...
410.988 7996.3 414.887 7995.19 418.98 7993.7 c
f
418.98 7993.7 m
418.98 7981.84 l
415.406 7984.14 411.82 7985.88 408.219 7987.04 c
...
... 26 lines omitted
...
410.988 7996.3 414.887 7995.19 418.98 7993.7 c
f

which as you can clearly see is much larger. Whereas with a font we would only include the instructions to draw the glyph once, and then use only a few bytes to draw each occurrence, with the paps output we include the drawing instructions for the glyph each and every time it is drawn.

So the problem is the way paps emits PostScript, and there is nothing that pdfwrite can do about it.

That said, I see that you are using Ghostscript 8.71 which is now 4 years old, you should probably consider upgrading.

  • I think your saying of test being rasterized may be correct. Where can I upload small sample of these text, ps, and pdf files? They are about 1.6KB, 32KB, and 183.9KB. Thank you. – user1026669 Sep 26 '14 at 21:35
  • I uploaded the small sample files that I mentioned. Could you take a look? drive.google.com/… – user1026669 Sep 26 '14 at 23:47
  • Kens, thank you very much for detailed explanation. If the Ghostscript is upgraded to the latest, will this problem be solved? If not, is there any other way to convert the UTF8 text file to PDF? How about post processing ps file from paps to replace long-repetitive description of a char to a more compact way as you said, using something like sed? Thank you very much for your help. – user1026669 Sep 29 '14 at 18:16
  • No, because the 'problem' is in the generated PostScript. PostScript is a programming language, PDF is not. So PostScript can use procedures, which PDF can't. Your only option to reduce the file emitted from paps would be to convert the procedures into glyph descriptions and create a type 3 font. A huge amount of effort. As for converting UTF-8 to PDF, why not simply open it in a text processing application (eg OpenOffice) and either export directly as PDF or print to PostScript. – KenS Sep 30 '14 at 7:15
  • KenS, thank you for the reply. I do not understand the details of gs so creating a procedure for type 3 font is beyond my capability currently. Many reports are created in a shell script from the oracle db and are put on the web in pdf using cron, so the manual intervention is not considered here. Thank you. – user1026669 Sep 30 '14 at 16:39

As the author of paps, I agree with the above description of paps' inner workings. Indeed, I chose to create my own font mechanism in the postscript language. That is history though as I have just released a new version of paps that uses cairo for its postscript, pdf, or svg rendering. This is much more compact than paps output, especially w.r.t. the result after doing ps2pdf. Please check out http://github.com/dov/paps .

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