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Hopefully this is a simple question...

I see that devise looks to be well tested, but I'd rather be safe than sorry. What are the minimum items one needs to test in a model spec that aren't already covered by devise's own tests?

Using ruby 2.1.2, rails 4.1.6, rspec-rails 3.1.0, & devise 3.3.0. Currently my model spec looks like:

describe User do
  before(:each) { @user = create(:user) }

  subject { @user }

  describe "factory" do
    it { should be_valid }
  end

  describe "class instance" do
    it { should respond_to(:email) }
    it { should respond_to(:encrypted_password) }
    it { should respond_to(:reset_password_token) }
    it { should respond_to(:reset_password_sent_at) }
    it { should respond_to(:remember_created_at) }
    it { should respond_to(:sign_in_count) }
    it { should respond_to(:current_sign_in_at) }
    it { should respond_to(:last_sign_in_at) }
    it { should respond_to(:current_sign_in_ip) }
    it { should respond_to(:last_sign_in_ip) }
    it { should respond_to(:created_at) }
    it { should respond_to(:updated_at) }
    it { should respond_to(:name) }
  end

  describe "name" do
    context "when it's not present" do
      before { @user.name = " " }
      it { should_not be_valid }
    end

    context "when it's too long" do
      before { @user.name = "a" * 51 }
      it { should_not be_valid }
    end

    context "when it's long enough" do
      before { @user.name = "a" * 50 }
      it { should be_valid }
    end
  end

  describe "email" do
    context "when it's not present" do
      before { @user.email = " " }
      it { should_not be_valid }
    end

    context "when it's format is invalid" do
      it "should not be valid" do
        addresses = %w[user@foo,com user_at_foo.org example.user@foo. foo@bar..com]
        addresses.each do |invalid_address|
          @user.email = invalid_address
          expect(@user).not_to be_valid
        end
      end
    end

    context "when it's format is valid" do
      it "should be valid" do
        addresses = %w[user@foo.COM A_US-ER@f.b.org frst.lst@foo.jp a+b@baz.cn]
        addresses.each do |valid_address|
          @user.email = valid_address
          expect(@user).to be_valid
        end
      end
    end

    context "when it's already taken" do
      let(:new_user) { create(:user) }

      before { @user = build(:user, email: new_user.email) }
      it { should_not be_valid }
    end

    context "address with mixed case" do
      let(:mixed_case_email) { "Foo@ExAMPle.CoM" }

      it "should be saved as all lower-case" do
        @user.email = mixed_case_email
        @user.save
        expect(@user.email).to eq mixed_case_email.downcase
      end
    end
  end

  describe "password" do
    context "when it's not present" do
      before { @user.password = @user.password_confirmation = " " }
      it { should_not be_valid }
    end

    context "when it doesn't match the password confirmation" do
      before { @user.password_confirmation = "mismatch" }
      it { should_not be_valid }
    end

    context "when it's too short" do
      before { @user.password = @user.password_confirmation = "a" * (Rails.application.config.devise.password_length.min - 1) }
      it { should_not be_valid }
    end
  end
end

Things like including factory_girl methods, the actual factory configuration, including rails/spec_helper, and other setup/config options are omitted...let me know if I should include these or any other items to help clarify.

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My approach to testing features implemented through third-party code would probably consist of three lines of defense:

  1. Test model validity before any operations are performed. You've done that in your describe "factory" spec.
  2. Test that model validations work as expected. This often feels like overkill, but it's valuable for regression testing, and I have occasionally caught errors from validations that were overly broad or narrow. Anyway, you've also done this.
  3. Write acceptance tests showing that key application-level interactions like login, logout, reset password, etc. are working as expected. For this, you'll need to use Capybara or something similar.
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  • I'm guessing that the acceptance tests should be done in a feature spec, no? – Steve Nims Sep 29 '14 at 0:27
  • Yes, exactly. It can be a standard Rails integration test or use Capybara or some other equivalent. Anything that exercises the whole application in the same way as the end user from the browser. – Chris Kottom Sep 29 '14 at 8:06

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