9

I would like for django rest to not convert my DateTime model field into a string date represtation when serializing it.

response_date = serializers.DateTimeField(source="updated_at")

I would like this to come out as

1411880508

and not

"2014-09-28T05:01:48.123"

14

You'll want to write a custom serializer field, like so:

class TimestampField(serializers.Field):
    def to_native(self, value):
        epoch = datetime.datetime(1970,1,1)
        return int((value - epoch).total_seconds())

To support write operations you'd want to inherit from WritableField and also implement from_native().

  • 1
    AFAIK the datetime is stored in the database as a number. I was hoping to get that number as instead of having to iterate over all records in the queryset. I fear there will be performance implications for both this and my own approach. – elewinso Sep 30 '14 at 14:52
  • 8
    In case you come by this answer and are using DRF 3.x, the to_native method is now to_representation – Paul Whipp Mar 9 '17 at 2:25
8
REST_FRAMEWORK = {
    # if you want with milliseconds or
    'DATETIME_FORMAT': '%s.%f', 
    # only with seconds
    'DATETIME_FORMAT': '%s', 
}

result in REST will be

1) 1517863184.666435

2) 1517863249

5

I was not able to get Tom's example to work and it seemed the values were not being modified. However it gave me a starting point and after some reading I found a way to produce the desired result:

[METHOD 1]

serializers.py

import time

class TimestampField(serializers.Field):
    def to_representation(self, value):
        return int(time.mktime(value.timetuple()))

class MySerializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):
    ts = TimestampField(source="my_fieldname") #Source must be a models.DateTimeField

    class Meta:
        model = myModel
        fields = ('id', 'ts')

JSON output:

[{
    "id": 1,
    "ts": 1475894303
},
{
    "id": 2,
    "ts": 1475833070 
}]

[METHOD 2]

Tom's explanation and the previous mentioned method are definitely more on track with maintaining standards (as the results are actually of type integer).

However a quick and dirty solution is to specify the format parameter for the DateTimeField and set it to show the value in seconds.

Note this probably won't work correctly on Windows machines! And may result in a ValueError: Invalid format string

To try it out just include the "format" keyword parameter in your serializer field like so:

serializers.py

class MySerializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):    
    timestamp = serializers.DateTimeField(format="%s")

    class Meta:
        model = myModel
        fields = ('id', 'ts')

JSON output:

[{
    "id": 1,
    "ts": "1475890361"
},
{
    "id": 2,
    "ts": "1475833070"
}]

Additionally you may include microseconds:

timestamp = serializers.DateTimeField(format="%s.%f")

If you want to test the functionality in your own interpreter (to verify your OS supports the %s parameter) just copy over these lines:

import datetime
print datetime.datetime.now().strftime('%s') #datetime formatted as seconds for REST

import time  #This is just for confirmation
print time.mktime(datetime.datetime.now().timetuple()) #time object result as float

I feel this method is a little inconsistent with the OPs question because the result is not actually of type integer, instead it is a string representation of an integer/float - and REST will surly add quotes around the value.

3

Global Configuration:

REST_FRAMEWORK = {
    'DATETIME_FORMAT': '%s.%f',
}
1

Although I prefer the answer given by Tom Christie as it is more robust. I decided to post my solution for the benefit of the potential readers

response_date = serializers.SerializerMethodField('get_timestamp')
def get_timestamp(self, obj):
    #times 1000 for javascript.
    return time.mktime(obj.updated_at.timetuple()) * 1000
1

As mentioned before you can set timestamp format for all datetimes globally by:

REST_FRAMEWORK = {
    'DATETIME_FORMAT': '%s',
}

But this doesnt work for regular dates, to make it work for dates you also have to set:

REST_FRAMEWORK = {
    'DATE_FORMAT': '%s',
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.