1

I have the following case classes:

object Fields {
  abstract class Base{
    def getString: String
  }
  case class A() extends Base{
    def getString = "A+++"
  }
  case class B() extends Base{
    def getString = "B++"
  }

  def fieldsToString(fields: List[Base]): String = {
    fields.tail.foldLeft(s"${fields.head.getString}") {(acc, f) =>
      acc + s",${f.getString}"
    }
  }
}

Then I tried to call this function in the following way:

 val fields = List(A, B, A)
 val result = Fields.fieldsToString(fields)

which gives me the following error:

type mismatch;
[error]  found   : List[scala.runtime.AbstractFunction0[Product with Serializable 
with Fields.Base] with Serializable]

So I thought I needed to introduce covariance:

 def fieldsToString[T >: Base](fields: List[T]): String = {
        fields.tail.foldLeft(s"${fields.head.getString}") {(acc, f) =>
          acc + s",${f.getString}"
        }
      }

Which then gives me the following compile error:

do not conform to method fieldsToString's type parameter bounds [T <: Fields.Base]

What exactly is the problem, is this due to the case classes, do they behave differently then normal classes?

2 Answers 2

1

Rightfold answer was close, what you have are not really functions but singleton types:

scala> case class A()
defined class A

scala> A
res0: A.type = A

scala> res0()
res1: A = A()

Quoting the scala overview paper (on page 9, right column) by Odersky when talking about abstract members:

Here, p.type is a singleton type, which represents just the object denoted by p. Singleton types by themselves are also useful for supporting chaining of method calls.

0

If you look closely at the first error message, you see that you have created a list of functions. Call them:

val fields = List(A(), B(), A())

This is due to case classes implicitly having companion objects with apply methods.

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