176

I would like to trim a beginning and ending double quote (") from a string.
How can I achieve that in Java? Thanks!

1
  • 1
    Is the string already known to have quotes around it, or is checking for quotes part of the problem?
    – Michael Myers
    Apr 9, 2010 at 15:39

19 Answers 19

300

You can use String#replaceAll() with a pattern of ^\"|\"$ for this.

E.g.

string = string.replaceAll("^\"|\"$", "");

To learn more about regular expressions, have al ook at http://regular-expression.info.

That said, this smells a bit like that you're trying to invent a CSV parser. If so, I'd suggest to look around for existing libraries, such as OpenCSV.

14
  • 7
    don't you think it will replaces all occurrences of double quotes with empty string rather then the first and the last.
    – GuruKulki
    Apr 9, 2010 at 15:36
  • 1
    @ufk: This isn't a complex regex. You may otherwise want to hassle with a bunch of String#indexOf(), String#substring(), methods and so on. It's only a little tad faster, but it's much more code. @GK: Uh, did you read/understand the regex or even test it?
    – BalusC
    Apr 9, 2010 at 15:37
  • 18
    @GK the caret represents the beginning of the searched string, and the dollar sign represents its end. The backslash here "escapes" the following quote so it's treated as just a character. So this regex says, replace all occurrences of quote at the start, or quote at the end, with the empty string. Just as requested. Apr 9, 2010 at 15:53
  • 3
    @Marc: I'm not sure how that's a problem considering the question in its current form.
    – BalusC
    May 16, 2015 at 17:40
  • 9
    Here is the regex broken down: ^\"|\"$. | means "or". It will thus match either ^\" or \"$. ^ matches start of string and $ matches end of string. ^\" means match a quote at the start of the string and \"$ matches a quote at the end of the string.
    – ibizaman
    Jan 2, 2017 at 7:12
36

To remove the first character and last character from the string, use:

myString = myString.substring(1, myString.length()-1);
2
  • 26
    This only requires that the quotes should guaranteed be present. If there's no guarantee, then you'll need to check it first beforehand.
    – BalusC
    Apr 9, 2010 at 15:32
  • 4
    @BalusC: Certainly. From my reading of the question, it seems that the string is already known to have quotes around it.
    – Michael Myers
    Apr 9, 2010 at 15:36
24

Also with Apache StringUtils.strip():

 StringUtils.strip(null, *)          = null
 StringUtils.strip("", *)            = ""
 StringUtils.strip("abc", null)      = "abc"
 StringUtils.strip("  abc", null)    = "abc"
 StringUtils.strip("abc  ", null)    = "abc"
 StringUtils.strip(" abc ", null)    = "abc"
 StringUtils.strip("  abcyx", "xyz") = "  abc"

So,

final String SchrodingersQuotedString = "may or may not be quoted";
StringUtils.strip(SchrodingersQuotedString, "\""); //quoted no more

This method works both with quoted and unquoted strings as shown in my example. The only downside is, it will not look for strictly matched quotes, only leading and trailing quote characters (ie. no distinction between "partially and "fully" quoted strings).

19

If the double quotes only exist at the beginning and the end, a simple code as this would work perfectly:

string = string.replace("\"", "");

1
  • Also works in build.gradle
    – Thiago
    Jul 25 at 15:04
15

This is the best way I found, to strip double quotes from the beginning and end of a string.

someString.replace (/(^")|("$)/g, '')
1
  • 4
    Maybe include single quotes too replace(/(^\"|\')|(\"|\'$)/g, "");
    – bob
    Jan 19, 2017 at 11:43
14

Kotlin

In Kotlin you can use String.removeSurrounding(delimiter: CharSequence)

E.g.

string.removeSurrounding("\"")

Removes the given delimiter string from both the start and the end of this string if and only if it starts with and ends with the delimiter. Otherwise returns this string unchanged.

The source code looks like this:

public fun String.removeSurrounding(delimiter: CharSequence): String = removeSurrounding(delimiter, delimiter)

public fun String.removeSurrounding(prefix: CharSequence, suffix: CharSequence): String {
    if ((length >= prefix.length + suffix.length) && startsWith(prefix) && endsWith(suffix)) {
        return substring(prefix.length, length - suffix.length)
    }
    return this
}
0
13

First, we check to see if the String is doubled quoted, and if so, remove them. You can skip the conditional if in fact you know it's double quoted.

if (string.length() >= 2 && string.charAt(0) == '"' && string.charAt(string.length() - 1) == '"')
{
    string = string.substring(1, string.length() - 1);
}
1
  • This is the most performant answer by orders of magnitude and it even specifies what to do regarding the optional or not presence of the quotes.
    – entonio
    Sep 25, 2017 at 18:01
12

Using Guava you can write more elegantly CharMatcher.is('\"').trimFrom(mystring);

1
  • 3
    is it possible to trim only single character? For example if my string ends with two single quotes still I want only single quote to get trimmed. Aug 18, 2015 at 14:19
5

I am using something as simple as this :

if(str.startsWith("\"") && str.endsWith("\""))
        {
            str = str.substring(1, str.length()-1);
        }
4

To remove one or more double quotes from the start and end of a string in Java, you need to use a regex based solution:

String result = input_str.replaceAll("^\"+|\"+$", "");

If you need to also remove single quotes:

String result = input_str.replaceAll("^[\"']+|[\"']+$", "");

NOTE: If your string contains " inside, this approach might lead to issues (e.g. "Name": "John" => Name": "John).

See a Java demo here:

String input_str = "\"'some string'\"";
String result = input_str.replaceAll("^[\"']+|[\"']+$", "");
System.out.println(result); // => some string
4

Edited: Just realized that I should specify that this works only if both of them exists. Otherwise the string is not considered quoted. Such scenario appeared for me when working with CSV files.

org.apache.commons.lang3.StringUtils.unwrap("\"abc\"", "\"")    = "abc"
org.apache.commons.lang3.StringUtils.unwrap("\"abc", "\"")    = "\"abc"
org.apache.commons.lang3.StringUtils.unwrap("abc\"", "\"")    = "abc\""
0
3

The pattern below, when used with java.util.regex.Matcher, will match any string between double quotes without affecting occurrences of double quotes inside the string:

"[^\"][\\p{Print}]*[^\"]"
2
Matcher m = Pattern.compile("^\"(.*)\"$").matcher(value);
String strUnquoted = value;
if (m.find()) {
    strUnquoted = m.group(1);
}
2

Modifying @brcolow's answer a bit

if (string != null && string.length() >= 2 && string.startsWith("\"") && string.endsWith("\"") {
    string = string.substring(1, string.length() - 1);
}
1
  • I would think that the method argument should be annotated with @NonNull and it should probably have something like Objects.requireNonNull(string) inside of it because if someone is calling stripQuotes(null) they are probably doing so by mistake!
    – brcolow
    Aug 3, 2019 at 19:04
1
private static String removeQuotesFromStartAndEndOfString(String inputStr) {
    String result = inputStr;
    int firstQuote = inputStr.indexOf('\"');
    int lastQuote = result.lastIndexOf('\"');
    int strLength = inputStr.length();
    if (firstQuote == 0 && lastQuote == strLength - 1) {
        result = result.substring(1, strLength - 1);
    }
    return result;
}
1

Scala

s.stripPrefix("\"").stripSuffix("\"")

This works regardless of whether the string has or does not have quotes at the start and / or end.

Edit: Sorry, Scala only

0

find indexes of each double quotes and insert an empty string there.

1
  • so it should be first index and the last index of double qoute.
    – GuruKulki
    Apr 9, 2010 at 15:39
0
public String removeDoubleQuotes(String request) {
    return request.replace("\"", "");
}
3
  • 5
    This question already contains multiple answers and an accepted answer. Can you explain (by editing your answer) where your answer differs from the other answers? Also know that Code-only answers are not useful in the long run.
    – 7uc1f3r
    Oct 2, 2020 at 19:51
  • 5
    This was already suggested in this answer stackoverflow.com/a/25452078/1839439 please do not add another one.
    – Dharman
    Oct 2, 2020 at 21:57
  • 4
    I am voting to delete this answer, because it is a reproduction of the essential components of stackoverflow.com/a/25452078/1839439. Additionally, there are other deleted answers for reposting this answer. As per Flag Duplicate Answers on the same Question, there is no additional value for SO to keep two answers with the same solution. From Review. Oct 3, 2020 at 3:54
0

Groovy

You can subtract a substring from a string using a regular expression in groovy:

String unquotedString = theString - ~/^"/ - ~/"$/

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.