12

How to validate a unit test with random values? I need guarantee that gen_age returns an integer between 15 and 99, but this code is not correct.

import random
import unittest


def gen_age():
    # generate integer between 15 and 99
    return random.randint(15, 99)


class AgeTest(unittest.TestCase):

    def setUp(self):
        self.a = gen_age()

    def test_choice(self):
        element = random.choice(self.a)
        self.assertTrue(element in self.a)

    def test_sample(self):
        for element in random.sample(self.a, 98):
            self.assertTrue(element in self.a)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
2
  • the test_choice doesn't make sense in conjunction with the setUp method, random.choice takes a list as parameter and self.a is an int. – Rafael Barros Sep 29 '14 at 1:39
  • With a test that generates random values, a single test only gives a chance of spotting problems. You generally need to test many times to ensure that you have validated a sufficiently large part of the possible result set. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 29 '14 at 1:40
23

The best way to test a similar behaviors is to set a seed to the Random object.

The random package provide a Random class. Instances of Random have the same methods than the random package; random(), randint(), sample(), ... In addition, Random accepts a seed. Adding a seed to Random makes it outputs deterministic. For example,

from random import Random
random = Random(666)
assert random.randint(0, 1000) == 467  # will never break

Consequently, you would like to tests your function as

from random import Random
import unittest

random = Random()

def gen_age():
    # generate integer between 15 and 99
    return random.randint(15, 99)


class AgeTest(unittest.TestCase):

    def setUp(self):
        global random
        random = Random(666)

    def test_gen_age(self):
        self.assertEqual(gen_age(), 53)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

Note that if your test is not in the same file, you will need to patch random using unittest.mock.patch. Something like that should work

from random import Random
from package.file import gen_age
import unittest


class AgeTest(unittest.TestCase):

    def setUp(self):
        self.random = Random(666)

    @patch('package.file.random')
    def test_gen_age(self, random):
        random.randint._mock_side_effect = self.random.randint
        self.assertEqual(gen_age(), 53)
2

It should be something like this:

def test_GenAge_ReturnIsBetween15And99(self):
    self.assertTrue(self.a >=15 and self.a <= 99);

But you don't realy need test for gen_age function currently. You are trying to test python random generator API, but what is reason? I don't see any.

6
  • Actually he is trying to test whether the parameters are being passed correctly to the API, and not the APi itself. – almanegra Sep 29 '14 at 1:41
  • 1
    The fact that one random outcome falls within the specified range is no guarantee that they all will. I think OP is looking for some assurance that the max and min are within the range, hard to insure when the outcomes are random. – pjs Sep 29 '14 at 1:41
  • 1
    @almanegra, "to test whether the parameters are being passed correctly"? What are situations in Python can be where some constants will be passed incorrectly(for example, you passed number 15, but function really received 23)? It's not C/C++ where everything can be overrides by preprocessor. – rufanov Sep 29 '14 at 1:48
  • 1
    @pjs, but why he should test that? This library API is already tested by vendor. It's working correctly. It's just single call to thrid-party API and there is no any logic, no any non-constraint values. It just 100% stub function. Stubs should not be tested. – rufanov Sep 29 '14 at 1:54
  • 2
    In this case I agree with your logic, but there are definitely cases where an algorithm relies on randomness and gets hard to test. I'm interested in those cases, which is why I was browsing this question. – pjs Sep 29 '14 at 19:43

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