I'm looking for way to pass method calls through from an object (wrapper) to a member variable of an object (wrappee). There are potentially many methods that need to be externalised, so a way to do this without changing the interface of the wrapper when adding a method to the wrappee would be helpful.

class Wrapper(object)
  def __init__(self, wrappee):
    self.wrappee = wrappee

  def foo(self):
    return 42

class Wrappee(object):
  def bar(self):
    return 12

o2 = Wrappee()
o1 = Wrapper(o2)

o1.foo() # -> 42
o1.bar() # -> 12
o1.<any new function in Wrappee>() # call directed to this new function 

It would be great if this call redirection is "fast" (relative to a direct call, i.e. not adding too much overhead).

  • why not inheritance? – Rafael Barros Sep 29 '14 at 3:00
  • Because I use both objects in isolation in a different context. – orange Sep 29 '14 at 3:07
up vote 5 down vote accepted

A somewhat elegant solution is by creating an "attribute proxy" on the wrapper class:

class Wrapper(object):
    def __init__(self, wrappee):
        self.wrappee = wrappee

    def foo(self):
        print 'foo'

    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        return getattr(self.wrappee, attr)


class Wrappee(object):
    def bar(self):
        print 'bar'

o2 = Wrappee()
o1 = Wrapper(o2)

o1.foo()
o1.bar()

all the magic happens on the __getattr__ method of the Wrapper class, which will try to access the method or attribute on the Wrapper instance, and if it doesn't exist, it will try on the wrapped one.

if you try to access an attribute that doesn't exist on either classes, you will get this:

o2.not_valid
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "so.py", line 26, in <module>
    o2.not_valid
  File "so.py", line 15, in __getattr__
    raise e
AttributeError: 'Wrappee' object has no attribute 'not_valid'
  • 1
    Thanks, I like this solution. – orange Sep 29 '14 at 5:06
  • I also found this (code.activestate.com/recipes/496741-object-proxying) which serves my purpose nicely. – orange Sep 29 '14 at 5:07
  • What's the point of a try/except` that does nothing but raise the same exception? Also, why raise e instead of just raise? Depending on your Python version, that may lose exception history or be slower or be exactly equivalent, but there's no way in which it can improve anything. – abarnert Sep 29 '14 at 5:15
  • @abarnert you're right, I put it there because it was sunday 11pm and I was super tired, and since it worked I didn't put much though on it. My first version used the super().__getattr__ and that had a lot more calls, so, not viable. – Rafael Barros Sep 29 '14 at 13:08
  • The super(Wrapper, self).__getattr__() is incorrect (must pass attr as argument), but it is incidental that calling __getattr__() on an object always generates AttributeError as it is not accessible like that (it is a dunder method). The body can really just be return getattr(self.wrappee, attr) as the method would only be invoked if the current class doesn't have this attribute, so there is no need to check for its existence again. I will make an edit for this. – haridsv Aug 23 '17 at 11:22

If you really need this to be fast, the fastest option is to monkeypatch yourself at initialization:

def __init__(self, wrappee):
    for name, value in inspect.getmembers(wrappee, callable):
        if not hasattr(self, name):
            setattr(self, name, value)

This will give your Wrapper instances normal data attributes whose values are bound methods of the Wrappee. That should be blazingly fast. Is it?

class WrapperA(object):
    def __init__(self, wrappee):
        self.wrappee = wrappee
        for name, value in inspect.getmembers(wrappee, callable):
            if not hasattr(self, name):
                setattr(self, name, value)

class WrapperB(object):
    def __init__(self, wrappee):
        self.wrappee = wrappee
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        return getattr(self.wrappee, name)

In [1]: %run wrapper
In [2]: o2 = Wrappee()
In [3]: o1a = WrapperA(o2)
In [4]: o1b = WrapperB(o2)
In [5]: %timeit o2.bar()
10000000 loops, best of 3: 154 ns per loop
In [6]: %timeit o1a.bar()
10000000 loops, best of 3: 159 ns per loop
In [7]: %timeit o1b.bar()
1000000 loops, best of 3: 879 ns per loop
In [8]: %timeit o1b.wrapper.bar()
1000000 loops, best of 3: 220 ns per loop

So, copying bound methods has a 3% cost (not sure why it even has that much…). Anything more dynamic than this would have to pull attributes from self.wrapper, which has a minimum 66% overhead. The usual __getattr__ solution has 471% overhead (and adding unnecessary extra stuff to it can only make it slower).

So, that sounds like an open and shut win for the bound-methods hack, right?

Not necessarily. That 471% overhead is still only 700 nanoseconds. Is that really going to make a difference in your code? Probably not unless it's being used inside a tight loop—in which case you're almost certainly going to want to copy the method to a local variable anyway.

And there are a lot of downsides of this hack. It's not the "one obvious way to do it". It won't work for special methods that aren't looked up on the instance dict. It's statically pulling the attributes off o2, so if you create any new ones later, o1 won't be proxying to them (try building a dynamic chain of proxies this way…). It wastes a lot of memory if you have a lot of proxies. It's slightly different between Python 2.x and 3.x (and even within the 2.x and 3.x series, if you rely on inspect), while __getattr__ has very carefully been kept the same from 2.3 up to the present (and in alternate Python implementations, too). And so on.

If you really need the speed, you may want to consider a hybrid: a __getattr__ method that caches proxied methods. You can even do it in two stages: something that's called once, you cache the unbound method in a class attribute and bind it on the fly; if it's then called repeatedly, you cache the bound method in an instance attribute.

  • +1 for the comparison. It sounds like you're suggesting some sort of memoization in your last comment? – orange Sep 29 '14 at 5:55
  • @orange: Exactly. Memoizing allows you to get most of the speed of stashing bound methods without the lost flexibility or (some of) the memory cost (and possibly the startup cost, if you create objects almost as often as you call methods on them). But only if this really is a performance hotspot; as I said, it usually won't be, and when it is, you usually want a different optimization anyway (copying bound methods to locals at the call point). – abarnert Sep 29 '14 at 6:03

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