12

I understand we can sort or order the objects, stored in Collection as per our requirement(s).

While I get deep understanding, I am not convinced by the fact that ascending and descending order of arrangement is achieved by (a - b) ->ascending or (b - a) -> descending where "a" and "b" are class members we chose to compare.

Example:

public int compareTo(Student s) {
     return this.grade - s.grade; //ascending order 
    // return s.grade - this.grade; // descending order
}

What is logic behind ordering object elements? how "(this.grade - s.grade)" if positive 1 moves "this.grade" front and puts "s.grade" next in order, why not other way around? Who validates the compare result (+1, -1, 0) and then puts in ascending order or descending order respectively, is there any documentation that describes internal working of this part?

public class Student implements Comparable <Student>{
    String name;
    int grade;
    public Student(String name, int grade) {
        this.name = name;
        this.grade = grade;
    }
    public int compareTo(Student s) {
         return this.grade - s.grade; //ascending order 
        // return s.grade - this.grade; // descending order
    }
    public String toString() {
        return this.name + ", " + this.grade;
    }
}

Please share, thank you much!


Edit:

I get the Java docs, my question is this:

sort these grades (13, 2)

Case ascending -> return this.grade - s.grade;

picture in my mind: 
compare (13, 2) , (13 - 2) > 0 so move 2 to front.
result -> 2, 13
------
Case descending -> return s.grade - this.grade;

picture in my mind: 
compare (2, 13) , (2 - 13) < 0 so move 13 to front.

result -> 13, 2

"How does this happen?" was my original question. I read the docs, still couldn't figure out.

  • The answer to your question depends, how are you sorting Student(s)? – Elliott Frisch Sep 29 '14 at 20:05
  • @ElliottFrisch, I mentioned that if ascending order I need to use (this.grade - s.grade) but why this.grade is first and s.grade is second, i.e. why (s.grade) is subtracted from (this.grade) ? why not other way around? , is this the standard rule I need to follow to get them in ascending order? – David Prun Sep 29 '14 at 20:07
  • Changing the result of compareTo does nothing without a caller. The result is interpreted by the caller, and it's documented in the Comparator javadoc. – Elliott Frisch Sep 29 '14 at 20:08
  • You shouldn't be subtracting to begin with. You'll end up with buggy code when the values approaches Integer.MAX_VALUE or Integer.MIN_VALUE. – aioobe Sep 29 '14 at 20:11
  • Each class that implements Comparable is responsible for defining its own natural sort order. If a caller wants to sort items of that class in reverse order, then they have to do some extra work. – Alex Sep 29 '14 at 20:12
10

What is logic behind ordering object elements? how "(this.grade - s.grade)" if positive 1 moves "this.grade" front and puts "s.grade" next in order, why not other way around?

Using negative numbers to say "this is less than that", positive numbers to say "this is more than that" and 0 to say "these 2 things are equal" has been in many computer languages for 30+ years.

Who validates the compare result (+1, -1, 0) and then puts in ascending order / descending order respectively, is there any documentation that describes internal working of this part?

There are several internal classes that use the return value to reorder elements in arrays or collections including

Collections.sort() Arrays.sort() TreeSet

EDIT

To answer HOW that works you will have to look at the source code for each of the classes I listed above. Some of them are quite complicated to try to make the sorting as efficient as possible. But in general, it all boils down to code like this:

if( data[i].compareTo(data[j]) > 0 ){
   // swap data[i] and  data[j]
}
  • thanks, but I cleared what I want to ask, in the edited post. – David Prun Sep 29 '14 at 20:24
  • 1
    @DavidPrun I've added more to my answer – dkatzel Sep 29 '14 at 20:36
8

@DavidPrun Good question. I have tried explaining this with an example.

(x,y) -> (2, 5)

Ascending Order (x.compareTo(y)):

if x.compareTo(y) == 1, then x > y , since y is smaller than x, you would have to move y in front of x.

2.compareTo(5) == -1 , then don't move 5 in front of 2.

Descending Order (y.compareTo(x)):

if y.compareTo(x) == 1, then y > x , since y is greater than x, you would have to move y in front of x.

5.compareTo(2) == 1 , move 5 in front of 2.

Basically, we will always move y in front of x, if the result of compareTo method is 1.

1

The Collections.sort() methods does .

now idk what exactly the algorithm of sort() in java is , i beleive its a modified double merged sort ... but somewhere in that code compareTo(Comparable c) is called to determin what is greater/lesser than , ill try to explain in a simplier algorithm :

lets say i have Circle , usually u would compare circles by their diameter so ...

public class Circle implements Comparable<Cricle> {
 int diameter;
 //constructor
 public int compareTo(Circle c){
  return this.diameter-c.diameter;
   }

now lets make an array of circles :

ArrayList<Circle> collection = new ArrayList;
collection.add(new Circle(10)); // and more circles

now lets assume this is the sorting algorithm defined in Collection.sort() :

  Comparable tmp;
  for(int i=0;i<collection.size();i++){
   for(int j=i;j<collection.size();j++){
    if(collection.get(j).compareTo(collection.get(i)>0){
      //swap
      tmp=collection.get(i);
      collection.set(i,collection.get(j));
      collection.set(j,tmp);
     }
    }
   }

now im not sure i wrote the sorting algorithm write (asceding/descending) i just did it fast , but i guess the point is clear as of how sort() is deciding what goes where ... you can ask in comment for further explanaition

  • you were close to understanding my problem, thanks. – David Prun Sep 29 '14 at 20:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.