3

I am getting a segmentation fault while trying to attempt swapping values in two variables. My code is :

void swap(int *a,int *b){
    int *temp;
    *temp=*a;
    *a=*b;
    *b=*temp;
}
int main(){
    int i=1,j=0;
    printf("Before %d,%d\n",i,j);
    swap(&i,&j);
    printf("After %d,%d\n",i,j);
    return 0;
}

I am getting the following error:

Before 1,0
After 0,1
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

What looks mysterious to me is the error is being produced after the values have been swapped successfully. What is the bug? Do I need to typecast the pointers anywhere?

  • 1
    this line: int *temp; is a pointer, that points to la-la land. then the code performs: *temp=*a; The result is some value has stepped on memory at 'some' unknown location. (probably in the address range of your program. Later that corrupted memory causes the seg fault. Much better to perform the swap with 3 xor statements. No temp variable, only 3 instructions, and no worries about corrupting memory. – user3629249 Oct 1 '14 at 22:25
11

Your pointer int *temp; points on nothing.

So, when your program does *temp=*a;, it puts value of a into random memory block.

Try this fix:

void swap(int *a,int *b){
    int temp;
    temp=*a;
    *a=*b;
    *b=temp;
}

Updated:

Additional question:

Suppose I want to use temp as a pointer variable and not as a regular variable, is there any way to get my program executed or I need to leave my stubbornness?

Answer: you can try this:

void swap(int *a,int *b){
    int *temp;
    temp = malloc(sizeof(int));
    if (temp == NULL)
      return;
    *temp=*a;
    *a=*b;
    *b=*temp;
    free(temp);
}
  • Suppose I want to use temp as a pointer variable and not as a regular variable, is there any way to get my program executed or I need to leave my stubbornness? – Gaurav Sep 30 '14 at 5:26
  • 1
    @Ilya I think that whenever compilers see an attempt to malloc() a small constant size, it should print an insult and quit. – Will Sep 30 '14 at 5:33
  • 1
    @Ajay I hope you are "just" trolling. – Will Sep 30 '14 at 5:34
  • 1
    @Will, I agree with you. But sometimes we have allocation and deallocation in different functions/modules. In this case it is good practice to set variable to NULL after deallocation. – Ilya Sep 30 '14 at 5:45
  • 2
    @Gaurav Okay, but keep in mind that normally there are only two good reasons to ever use m/c/realloc(): 1) when you don't know the size of your variable/array at compile time, or 2) when you need an amount of memory large enough that it could blow up the stack, and you don't want a global or static memory duration. – Will Sep 30 '14 at 5:49
3

Your swap function is wrong. It should be

void swap(int *a,int *b){
  int temp = *a;
  *a= *b;
  *b= temp;
}
1

Use this swap function :-

void swap(int *a,int *b){
    int temp;
    temp=*a;
    *a=*b;
    *b=temp;
   }

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