31

I'm having 2 classes which extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter. And can't make them work together.

The idea is as follows:

  1. Have one WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter which only adds custom filter to security chain. The filter does some custom authentication and saves Authentication into SecurityContext. This generally works fine. Configured as follows (imports omitted):
 @Order(1)
 @Configuration
 @EnableWebMvcSecurity
 public class BestSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

     @Autowired
     private BestPreAuthenticationFilter ssoAuthenticationFilter;

     @Bean
     protected FilterRegistrationBean getSSOAuthenticationFilter() {
         FilterRegistrationBean filterRegistrationBean = new FilterRegistrationBean(ssoAuthenticationFilter);

         // Avoid include to the default chain
         filterRegistrationBean.setEnabled(false);

         return filterRegistrationBean;
     }

     @Override
     protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
         http
            .addFilterAfter(ssoAuthenticationFilter, SecurityContextPersistenceFilter.class);

     }

     @Configuration
     protected static class AuthenticationConfiguration extends
             GlobalAuthenticationConfigurerAdapter {

         @Autowired
         private BestAuthenticationProvider authenticationProvider;

         @Override
         public void configure(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
             auth.authenticationProvider(authenticationProvider);
         }
     }
 }
  1. I want the above to be kind of library class which anyone can include via @ComponentScan and get the custom authentication sorted. Obviously they want to provide custom HttpSecurity to secure edpoints. Trying something like:
 @Configuration
 @EnableGlobalMethodSecurity(securedEnabled = true, prePostEnabled = true)
 @Order(SecurityProperties.ACCESS_OVERRIDE_ORDER)
 public class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

     @Override
     protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
         http
             .csrf().disable()
             .authorizeRequests()
             .antMatchers("/testUrl").hasRole("NON_EXISTING")
             .anyRequest().authenticated();
     }
 }

Obviously the test URL should not be accessible as my user is not member of role NON_EXISTING. Unfortunatelly she is.

If I move the security authorizeRequests() part to the configuration class form 1. next to adding the security filter then it blocks the access as expected. But in my case it looks like the second configuration is ignored.

I also debugged the configure() methods and noticed that HttpSecurity is not the same object which smells a bit.

Any tips how can I make this work much appreciated.

Sum up of the goal:

  • have one WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter which adds the filter and is hidden from the user of the library
  • let the user define her own custom endpoint security

Spring boot 1.1.6-RELEASE

4
  • Having multiple WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter is the same as having multiple http elements in XML. So they aren't merged into one but are both used separatly. – M. Deinum Sep 30 '14 at 6:48
  • Yep, this is more less what I understand now. Any tips how this can be resolved? Will try to extend the BestSecurityConfig overriding configure() on it and remove @Configuration ... lets see :) – Jan Zyka Sep 30 '14 at 7:07
  • ... and it works. I'm just wondering whether it is right – Jan Zyka Sep 30 '14 at 7:13
  • @M. Deinum @ Jan Zyka I have the same exact problem. Debugging shows that my filter got registered. But it was ignored. i would like to understand what it means by too http elements in xml. I got the web.xml reference but :/ – YetAnotherBot Nov 29 '18 at 10:00
15

Define a special interface

public interface ServiceWebSecurityConfigurer {
    void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception;
}

Then have just one ConfigurerAdapter:

public class MyConfigurerAdapter extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Autowired(required = false)
    ServiceWebSecurityConfigurer serviceSecConfig;

    public void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http.authorizeRequests(). // whatever

        if (serviceSecConfig != null) serviceSecConfig.configure(http);

        http.authorizeRequests(). // whatever
    }
}

and then just implement ServiceWebSecurityConfigurer elsewhere when needed. There can be multiple implementations as well, just autowire them as list and iterate and use them all in your main configuration.

5
  • Yep, this is good, I used this several times as well and it fits to the concept of spring configurers. – Jan Zyka Mar 12 '18 at 8:30
  • Love it. Works better than AbstractHttpConfigurer as it seems to ignore certain settings. – user5365075 Apr 12 '18 at 21:36
  • 2
    After years of trial/error/forgetting about this and finding it again I believe this is the best answer. – Jan Zyka Sep 27 '19 at 12:42
  • How do you throw an AuthenticationManager into the game? I have two WebSecurityConfigurerAdapters of which one of them needs an AuthenticationManager. If I add a WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter as suggested and overwrite authenticationManagerBean() in its implementation, I get a circular dependency when I inject the AuthenticationManager into the bean implementing ServiceWebSecurityConfigurer. – homaxto Jan 20 at 7:58
  • @homaxto well.. you could change the interface to take both httpsecurity and authenticationmanager as a parameter, for example. but it gets messy easily if you have lot of things like that – eis Jan 20 at 17:17
15

So one option I just found is:

  1. Remove the @Configuration annotation from the first bean

And change the 2. to:

 @Configuration
 @EnableGlobalMethodSecurity(securedEnabled = true, prePostEnabled = true)
 @Order(SecurityProperties.ACCESS_OVERRIDE_ORDER)
 public class SecurityConfig extends BestSecurityConfig { //Note the changed extend !

     @Override
     protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {

         super.configure(http); // Merge of the 2 HTTP configurations

         http
             .csrf().disable()
             .authorizeRequests()
             .antMatchers("/testUrl").hasRole("NON_EXISTING")
             .anyRequest().authenticated();
     }
 }

Any comments on whether this is right or wrong approach much appreciated

Edit: After few years I still didn't find other way but I like this way more and more. Even in the default case you extend the abstract WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter there is no reason why some other layer of abstraction can't provide another abstract extension which provides meaningful defaults.

3
  • You now have a single WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter so yes it would work but requires extension instead of automatic detection. – M. Deinum Sep 30 '14 at 7:27
  • 2
    Yes, so is this how I'm supposed to achieve such task? Or should I use it in a different way & how? – Jan Zyka Sep 30 '14 at 7:35
  • I think it is a pretty good solution you are proposing using extension. – Daniel Oct 8 '16 at 16:29
9

I founded (in my opinion) a cleaner way of structuring some default configurations and make it simple to integrate in new projects by using Custom DSLs.

I'm using it to config JWT authentication filters, but i think a CORS filter is more simple and didactic:

public class CustomCorsFilterDsl extends AbstractHttpConfigurer<CustomCorsFilterDsl, HttpSecurity> {

    @Override
    public void init(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        //your init code here, no needed in this case
    }

    @Override
    public void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        CorsFilter corsFilter = corsFilter(corsProperties);
        http.addFilterBefore(corsFilter, UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter.class);
    }

    private CorsFilter corsFilter(CorsProperties corsProperties) {
        UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
        CorsConfiguration config = new CorsConfiguration();
        config.setAllowCredentials(true);
        config.addAllowedOrigin("http://localhost:9000");
        config.addAllowedHeader("*");
        config.addAllowedMethod("GET, POST, PUT, PATCH, DELETE");
        source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", config);
        return new CorsFilter(source);
    }

    public static CustomCorsFilterDsl dsl() {
        return new CustomCorsFilterDsl();
    }
}

And in your WebSecurityConfig you can use it like this:

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http
                .csrf().disable()
                .exceptionHandling()
                .and()
                .sessionManagement()
                .sessionCreationPolicy(SessionCreationPolicy.STATELESS)
                .and()
                .authorizeRequests()
                .antMatchers("/foo/**").permitAll()
                //... your configurations
                .antMatchers("/**").authenticated()
                .and()
                .apply(CustomCorsFilterDsl.dsl());
    }
}

And you accomplished your objective of having libraries with default configurations independent of your projects code, in a more clear way, because you can visualize in the project's WebSecurityConfig a custom CORS entry.

6
  • Cool, so you are basically saying that AbstractHttpConfigurer will be discovered and applie through component scan, is that correct? Good job on this! – Jan Zyka Aug 7 '17 at 19:51
  • In the example you don't need to declare CustomCorsFilterDsl as a component, because you are creating an instance by using the static method: CustomCorsFilterDsl.dsl(). But I imagine that you can accomplished the same behavior by using @Component on the Dsl and through @ComponentScan – Julio Villane Aug 8 '17 at 20:23
  • I like this approach, but how would you incorporate it into an external library that uses an @Enable... ? We have an internal library that sets up JWT filters using @EnableJWTAuthentication. It needs to inject those filters in the HttpSecurity. Somehow I feel like this approach gives complete control of the HttpSecurity to the user, but on the other hand I feel like if someone use an annotation, they probably know what it does (okay in practice that's usually not the case... but theoretically it should be). – user5365075 Feb 21 '18 at 8:07
  • I managed to code something similar and use another class that extends from AbstractHttpConfigurer and use it like this: CustomJwtAuthFilter .apply(CustomJwtAuthFilter.dsl().skipPaths("/public/**").skipPaths("/anotherPublic/**");. It's kind of difficult to explain it in detail in a comment but if you need more information I can deliver it. – Julio Villane Feb 23 '18 at 3:57
  • Your solution works fine for me, but it seems you can only add filters, because I tried setting other things like session, or authenticationEntrypoint, and those settings are ignored. It seems I'm not the only one having this issue: stackoverflow.com/questions/44818399/… – user5365075 Mar 1 '18 at 12:57

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