53

I have a data.frame mydf with about 2500 rows. These rows correspond to 69 classes of objects in colum 1 mydf$V1, and I want to count how many rows per object class I have. I can get a factor of these classes with:

objectclasses = unique(factor(mydf$V1, exclude="1"));

What's the terse R way to count the rows per object class? If this were any other language I'd be traversing an array with a loop and keeping count but I'm new to R programming and am trying to take advantage of R's vectorised operations.

2

9 Answers 9

65

Or using the dplyr library:

library(dplyr)
set.seed(1)
dat <- data.frame(ID = sample(letters,100,rep=TRUE))
dat %>% 
  group_by(ID) %>%
  summarise(no_rows = length(ID))

Note the use of %>%, which is similar to the use of pipes in bash. Effectively, the code above pipes dat into group_by, and the result of that operation is piped into summarise.

The result is:

Source: local data frame [26 x 2]

   ID no_rows
1   a       2
2   b       3
3   c       3
4   d       3
5   e       2
6   f       4
7   g       6
8   h       1
9   i       6
10  j       5
11  k       6
12  l       4
13  m       7
14  n       2
15  o       2
16  p       2
17  q       5
18  r       4
19  s       5
20  t       3
21  u       8
22  v       4
23  w       5
24  x       4
25  y       3
26  z       1

See the dplyr introduction for some more context, and the documentation for details regarding the individual functions.

8
  • This is exactly what I wanted. The table answer is also useful; there are a few problems with the data that prevent me using a table for the moment, so I am using a data.frame for the moment.
    – Escher
    Commented Sep 30, 2014 at 7:30
  • I'm new to R, but it seems this dplyr package is the jquery of R. It's the answer for a LOT of things.
    – Tim Coker
    Commented Feb 17, 2016 at 14:56
  • 5
    Using table instead would be better, as it doesn't require an extra library.
    – Yan Foto
    Commented Aug 9, 2016 at 7:37
  • 1
    ggplot2 actually provides an added value over graphics, whereas in this case the provided solution does exactly the same as what table would do for a factor. My comment refers the problem and the question at hand and is not a general statement regarding packages.
    – Yan Foto
    Commented Aug 9, 2016 at 8:39
  • 4
    I am on the same page with you on what deplyr can do. I think the misunderstanding is coming from my statement. I don't acclaim universality! I meant that as an opinion limited within the context of this question. Given a factor f, table(f) does the same thing as this solution suggests.
    – Yan Foto
    Commented Aug 9, 2016 at 8:48
41

Here 2 ways to do it:

set.seed(1)
tt <- sample(letters,100,rep=TRUE)

## using table
table(tt)
tt
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z 
2 3 3 3 2 4 6 1 6 5 6 4 7 2 2 2 5 4 5 3 8 4 5 4 3 1 
## using tapply
tapply(tt,tt,length)
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z 
2 3 3 3 2 4 6 1 6 5 6 4 7 2 2 2 5 4 5 3 8 4 5 4 3 1 
34

Using plyr package:

library(plyr)

count(mydf$V1)

It will return you a frequency of each value.

2
  • 1
    This is the easiest method I can see here, and it works. Thanks!
    – kabammi
    Commented Jun 24, 2019 at 1:04
  • Nice! it returns a list. Commented Dec 27, 2022 at 11:26
25

Using data.table

 library(data.table)
 setDT(dat)[, .N, keyby=ID] #(Using @Paul Hiemstra's `dat`)

Or using dplyr 0.3

 res <- count(dat, ID)
 head(res)
 #Source: local data frame [6 x 2]

 #  ID n
 #1  a 2
 #2  b 3
 #3  c 3
 #4  d 3
 #5  e 2
 #6  f 4

Or

  dat %>% 
      group_by(ID) %>% 
      tally()

Or

  dat %>% 
      group_by(ID) %>%
      summarise(n=n())
0
17

We can use summary on factor column:

summary(myDF$factorColumn)
2
  • summary(ggplot2::diamonds$clarity) looks like it performed as desired.
    – woodvi
    Commented Jan 4, 2018 at 0:01
  • 1
    This should be accepted as a solution, it is done via one built-in function and outputs exactly what is needed. Commented Mar 28, 2021 at 15:57
6

One more approach would be to apply n() function which is counting the number of observations

library(dplyr)
library(magrittr)
data %>% 
  group_by(columnName) %>%
  summarise(Count = n())
3

In case I just want to know how many unique factor levels exist in the data, I use:

length(unique(df$factorcolumn))
1
  • this doesn't yield the number of values per level
    – Ben
    Commented Apr 29, 2022 at 7:28
1

Use the package plyr with lapply to get frequencies for every value (level) and every variable (factor) in your data frame.

library(plyr)
lapply(df, count)
1
0

This is an old post, but you can do this with base R and no data frames/data tables:

sapply(levels(yTrain), function(sLevel) sum(yTrain == sLevel))

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