1
SELECT 
   *, COUNT(examID) AS ExamCount 
FROM 
   ExamSession
GROUP BY
   [examID], [userID], [sessionID]

This gives me a result set, but the ExamCount has a '1' in each row even if an exam is displayed in more than 1 row... I'm trying to get the number of times an examID appears in the result set.

SO the result set looks like this:

examID | userID | sessionID | ExamCount
---------------------------------------------------------
1111   | xxxxxx | xxxxxx    |   1
1111   | xxxxxx | xxxxxx    |   1
1111   | xxxxxx | xxxxxx    |   1
2222   | xxxxxx | xxxxxx    |   1
2222   | xxxxxx | xxxxxx    |   1
3333   | xxxxxx | xxxxxx    |   1
3333   | xxxxxx | xxxxxx    |   1
3333   | xxxxxx | xxxxxx    |   1
3333   | xxxxxx | xxxxxx    |   1

How can I get a count of the number of times an examID appears?

Thanks!

0
7

Code:

COUNT(examID) OVER(PARTITION BY examID) AS ExamCount
2
  • Could you explain this? Thanks
    – Horaciux
    Sep 30 '14 at 17:10
  • 1
    @Horaciux this link explains the OVER clause in SQL Server
    – Lamak
    Sep 30 '14 at 19:14
1

To elaborate a bit on jbarker answer

if object_id(N'dbo.groupTry',N'U') is not null
    drop table dbo.groupTry
create table dbo.groupTry
(
    examID int,
    userID int,
    sessionID int,
    ExamCount int
)

insert into dbo.groupTry values
(1111, 1234, 4321, 1),
(1111, 9876, 6789, 1),
(1111, 8765, 5678, 1),
(2222, 7654, 4567, 1),
(2222, 6543, 3456, 1),
(3333, 5432, 2345, 1),
(3333, 1987, 1789, 1),
(3333, 1876, 1678, 1),
(3333, 1765, 1567, 1)

select 
    count(g.examID) over(partition by examID) as ExamCount, 
    g.examID,
    g.userID,
    g.sessionID,
    g.ExamCount 
from dbo.groupTry g
group by examID,
    userID,
    sessionID,
    ExamCount

In my own simple words, over just means: don't look at all the columns when you count, just look and count the unique rows of examID (because we are partitioning by examID).

2
  • Thanks for clarification.
    – Horaciux
    Oct 1 '14 at 0:55
  • @Horaciux no problem. Hope it helped.
    – Paul Kar.
    Oct 1 '14 at 16:09
0

edit:

select A.examid, B.UserId, b.SessionID, A.ExamCount from 
( SELECT examId, COUNT(examID) AS ExamCount 
   FROM ExamSession
   GROUP BY [examID]) A
JOIN (select [examID] ,[userID]  ,[sessionID] from ExamSession) B
on a.examid = b.examid
1
  • Oops, my bad. It should be B.SessionID. Edited my answer.
    – SouravA
    Sep 30 '14 at 17:06
0
   SELECT examId, COUNT(examID) AS ExamCount 
   FROM ExamSession
   GROUP BY [examID]

EDIT: If you need all columns

select t1.*, t2.ExamCount 
from(
    SELECT *       
    FROM 
       ExamSession 
    GROUP BY
       [examID], [userID], [sessionID]) t1 
inner join (
    SELECT examId, COUNT(examID) AS ExamCount 
       FROM ExamSession
       GROUP BY [examID]) t2
 on t1.examID=t2.examID
2
  • 1
    This only works without the other columns that he specified in his output that he wanted. Sep 30 '14 at 16:31
  • NP. The more answers the merrier! Sep 30 '14 at 17:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.