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I'm trying to get my head around this issue where I am using the Entity Framework (6) in an N-tier application. Since data from the repository (which contains all communication with the database) should be used in a higher tier (the UI, services etc), I need to map it to DTOs.

In the database, there's quite a few many-to-many relationships going on, so the datastructure can/will get complex somewhere along the line of the applications lifetime. What I stumbled upon is, that I am repeating the exact same code when writing the repository methods. An example of this is my FirmRepository which contains a GetAll() method and GetById(int firmId) method.

In the GetById(int firmId) method, I have the following code (incomplete since there's a lot more relations that needs to be mapped to DTOs):

public DTO.Firm GetById(int id)
    {
        // Return result
        var result = new DTO.Firm();

        try
        {
            // Database connection
            using (var ctx = new MyEntities())
            {
                // Get the firm from the database 
                var firm = (from f in ctx.Firms
                            where f.ID == id
                            select f).FirstOrDefault();

                // If a firm was found, start mapping to DTO object
                if (firm != null)
                {
                    result.Address = firm.Address;
                    result.Address2 = firm.Address2;
                    result.VAT = firm.VAT;
                    result.Email = firm.Email;

                    // Map Zipcode and City
                    result.City = new DTO.City()
                    {
                        CityName = firm.City.City1,
                        ZipCode = firm.City.ZipCode
                    };

                    // Map ISO code and country
                    result.Country = new DTO.Country()
                    {
                        CountryName = firm.Country.Country1,
                        ISO = firm.Country.ISO
                    };

                    // Check if this firm has any exclusive parameters
                    if (firm.ExclusiveParameterType_Product_Firm.Any())
                    {
                        var exclusiveParamsList = new List<DTO.ExclusiveParameterType>();

                        // Map Exclusive parameter types
                        foreach (var param in firm.ExclusiveParameterType_Product_Firm)
                        {
                            // Check if the exclusive parameter type isn't null before proceeding
                            if (param.ExclusiveParameterType != null)
                            {
                                // Create a new exclusive parameter type DTO
                                var exclusiveParameter = new DTO.ExclusiveParameterType()
                                {
                                    ID = param.ExclusiveParameterType.ID,
                                    Description = param.ExclusiveParameterType.Description,
                                    Name = param.ExclusiveParameterType.Name
                                };

                                // Add the new DTO to the list
                                exclusiveParamsList.Add(exclusiveParameter);
                            }
                        }

                        // A lot more objects to map....

                        // Set the list on the result object
                        result.ExclusiveParameterTypes = exclusiveParamsList;
                    }
                }
            }

            // Return DTO
            return result;
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            // Log exception
            Logging.Instance.Error(e);

            // Simply return null
            return null;
        }
    }

This is just one method. The GetAll() method will then have the exact same mapping logic which results in duplicated code. Also, when more methods gets added, i.e. a Find or Search method, the same mapping needs to be copied again. This is, of course, not ideal.

I have read a lot about the famous AutoMapper framework that can map entites to/from DTOs, but since I have these many-to-many relations it quickly feels bloated with AutoMapper config code. I've also read this article, which make sense in my eyes: http://rogeralsing.com/2013/12/01/why-mapping-dtos-to-entities-using-automapper-and-entityframework-is-horrible/

Is there any other way of doing this without copy/pasting the same code over and over again?

Thanks in advance!

  • 1
    What are you trying to achieve? Are you sure you should return DTO objects instead of entities? What is the point of "remapping" objects into almost the same objects? – tdragon Sep 30 '14 at 17:29
  • Hi tdragon, thanks for your input. When I return entities to, i.e. my MVC controllers, the data gets lost because they're out of scope of the DbContext. This is why I'm mapping data to the DTOs. Yes? :-) – Bo Mortensen Sep 30 '14 at 17:31
  • check this out if this helps stackoverflow.com/questions/13156437/… – NMK Sep 30 '14 at 17:32
  • 1
    Thanks Mohank, but I'm trying not to use AutoMapper since I have these many-to-many relations. I guess it is possible to map these relations using AutoMapper, but imho, it's not pretty either :-/ – Bo Mortensen Sep 30 '14 at 17:35
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    I am not an expert on Entity Framework, but if you're mapping your entites because otherwise you run into scoping issue, I think it might be how you're using DbContext. DbContext goes out of scope as soon as you leave the using statement. Since you are using linq you are doing deferred execution. You might be able to get around the problem by using eager queries. Call .ToList or .ToArray inside the using statement. This will force the db call to happen immediately and should result in populated enitites you can then pass to your views. – Philip Pittle Sep 30 '14 at 17:55
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You can make an extension method on Entity firm (DB.Firm) like this,

public static class Extensions
    {
        public static DTO.Firm ToDto(this DB.Firm firm)
        {
           var result = new DTO.Firm();
           result.Address = firm.Address;
           result.Address2 = firm.Address2;
           //...

           return result;    
        }
    }

Then you can convert DB.Firm object anywhere in your code like firm.ToDto();

| improve this answer | |
0

An alternate strategy is to use a combination of the class constructor and an explicit and/or implicit conversion operator(s). It allows you to cast one user-defined entity to another entity. The feature also has the added benefit of abstracting the process out so you aren't repeating yourself.

In your DTO.Firm class, define either an explicit or implicit operator (Note: I am making assumptions about the name of your classes):

public class Firm {
  public Firm(DB.Firm firm) {
    Address = firm.Address;
    Email = firm.Email;
    City = new DTO.City() {
      CityName = firm.City.City1;
      ZipCode = firm.City.ZipCode;
    };
    // etc.
  }

  public string Address { get; set;}
  public string Email { get; set; }
  public DTO.City City { get; set; }
  // etc.

  public static explicit operator Firm(DB.Firm f) {
    return new Firm(f);
  }
}

You can then use it in your repository code like this:

public DTO.Firm GetById(int id) {
  using (var ctx = new MyEntities()) {
    var firm = (from f in ctx.Firms
                where f.ID == id
                select f).FirstOrDefault();

    return (DTO.Firm)firm;
  }
}

public List<DTO.Firm> GetAll() {
  using (var ctx = new MyEntities()) {
    return ctx.Firms.Cast<DTO.Firm>().ToList();
  }
}

Here's the reference in MSDN.

| improve this answer | |
  • Will this approach work with Entity Frameworks lazy queries? Will the conversion operator be called before dbcontext goes out of scope or will it be necessary to do the casting in immediately via a select? – Philip Pittle Sep 30 '14 at 19:40
  • The last project I worked on relied on this approach and we used lazy loading in EF, so, I'm fairly sure the answer is yes, but I reserve the right to be wrong. :) As far as the dbContext, you don't have to do the conversion on the select. You can retrieve the data from the context, then cast the result later. – Brett Sep 30 '14 at 21:52
  • Hi Brett, that's actually quite a neat solution right there. Thanks! :-) Now, if I don't want to make casts every time, I'd have to use the implicit operator instead. Using the implicit operator means, that my DTO objects must be 100% equal to the entities, right? – Bo Mortensen Oct 1 '14 at 7:05
  • @BoMortensen Actually, no, you would implement the implicit operator the same way. The only difference is that you no longer have to specifiy the cast type explicity during assignment (except for Linq queries). Therefore, using the example above, you could change return (DTO.Firm)firm; to return firm;. The cast is implicitly understood. The only negative, IMO, is that it's less readable or understandable to someone maintaining the code later. – Brett Oct 1 '14 at 19:07
0

About mapping: it actually does not really matter if you use Automapper or prepare you mappings completely manually in some method (extension one or as explicit casting operator as mentioned in other answers) - the point is to have it in one place for reusability.

Just remember - you used FirstOrDefault method, so you actually called the database for a Firm entity. Now, when you are using properties of this entity, especiallly collections, they will be lazy loaded. If you have a lot of them (as you suggest in your question), you may face a huge amount of additional call and it might be a problem, especcially in foreach loop. You may end up with dozen of calls and heavy performace issues just to retrieve one dto. Just rethink, if you really need to get such a big object with all its relations.

For me, your problem is much deeper and considers application architecture. I must say, I personally do not like repository pattern with Entity Framework, in addition with Unit Of Work pattern. It seems to be very popular (at least of you take a look at google results for the query), but for me it does not fit very well with EF. Of course, it's just my opinion, you may not agree with me. For me it's just building another abstraction over already implemented Unit Of Work (DbContext) and repositories (DbSet objects). I found this article very interesing considering this topic. Command/query separation way-of-doing-things seems much more elegant for me, and also it fits into SOLID rules much better.

As I said, it's just my opinion and you may or may not agree with me. But I hope it gives you some perpective here.

| improve this answer | |

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