4

I need to traverse all pairs i,j with 0 <= i < n, 0 <= j < n and i < j for some positive integer n.

Problem is that I can only loop through another variable, say k. I can control the bounds of k. So the problem is to determine two arithmetic methods, f(k) and g(k) such that i=f(k) and j=g(k) traverse all admissible pairs as k traverses its consecutive values.

How can I do this in a simple way?

  • Does the traversal order matter? If it does, please specify the required order. – NPE Sep 30 '14 at 20:02
  • @NPE traversal order doesn't matter, as long as all pairs are traversed exactly once. – becko Sep 30 '14 at 20:02
  • is this what you are looking for {(f(k), g(k)) | 0 <= f(k) < n, 0 <= g(k) < n, f(k) < g(k) }? what are the bounds of k? what is f(k) and g(k)? – Logan Murphy Sep 30 '14 at 20:06
  • @LoganMurphy yeah. We want a method F(k)(=(f(k),g(k))) that takes k and returns a pair (i,j), such that i < j, 0<=i<n and 0<=j<n, and such that when k takes values in a suitable range, all such pairs appear exactly once. – becko Sep 30 '14 at 20:08
  • Interesting question. Something tells me that there's probably an elegant algorithm for this, but I am struggling to come up with one. :-) – NPE Sep 30 '14 at 20:09
3

I think I got it (in Python):

def get_ij(n, k):
  j = k // (n - 1)  # // is integer (truncating) division
  i = k - j * (n - 1)
  if i >= j:
    i = (n - 2) - i
    j = (n - 1) - j
  return i, j

for n in range(2, 6):
  print n, sorted(get_ij(n, k) for k in range(n * (n - 1) / 2))

It basically folds the matrix so that it's (almost) rectangular. By "almost" I mean that there could be some unused entries on the far right of the bottom row.

The following pictures illustrate how the folding works for n=4:

n=4

and n=5:

n=5

Now, iterating over the rectangle is easy, as is mapping from folded coordinates back to coordinates in the original triangular matrix.

Pros: uses simple integer math.

Cons: returns the tuples in a weird order.

3

I think I found another way, that gives the pairs in lexicographic order. Note that here i > j instead of i < j.

Basically the algorithm consists of the two expressions:

i = floor((1 + sqrt(1 + 8*k))/2)
j = k - i*(i - 1)/2

that give i,j as functions of k. Here k is a zero-based index.

Pros: Gives the pairs in lexicographic order.

Cons: Relies on floating-point arithmetic.

Rationale:

We want to achieve the mapping in the following table:

k -> (i,j)
0 -> (1,0)
1 -> (2,0)
2 -> (2,1)
3 -> (3,0)
4 -> (3,1)
5 -> (3,2)
....

We start by considering the inverse mapping (i,j) -> k. It isn't hard to realize that:

k = i*(i-1)/2 + j

Since j < i, it follows that the value of k corresponding to all pairs (i,j) with fixed i satisfies:

i*(i-1)/2 <= k < i*(i+1)/2

Therefore, given k, i=f(k) returns the largest integer i such that i*(i-1)/2 <= k. After some algebra:

i = f(k) = floor((1 + sqrt(1 + 8*k))/2)

After we have found the value i, j is trivially given by

j = k - i*(i-1)/2
  • It would be nice to see proof/derivation/illustration to understand how it works. The second line seems intuitively clear, but the first is a bit of a mystery (at least to my tired sleepy brain). – NPE Sep 30 '14 at 21:41
  • @NPE I'll write something up. I'm just trying to get it clear in my head first. – becko Sep 30 '14 at 21:42
  • I've briefly tested this and it does seem to work (modulo any potential issues with floating-point math that I haven't tested for or thought through). – NPE Sep 30 '14 at 21:47
  • @NPE Added some explanation. – becko Oct 1 '14 at 18:31
  • 1
0

I'm not sure to understand exactly the question, but to sum up, if 0 <= i < n, 0 <= j < n , then you want to traverse 0 <= k < n*n

for (int k = 0; k < n*n; k++) {
    int i = k / n;
    int j = k % n;
    // ...
}

[edit] I just saw that i < j ; so, this solution is not optimal since there's less that n*n necessary iterations ...

  • Exactly, if it weren't for the i < j restriction, this would be the solution. I suspect that the actual solution can't be too far from this – becko Sep 30 '14 at 20:44
0

If we think of our solution in terms of a number triangle, where k is the sequence

1 
2  3 
4  5  6 
7  8  9  10
11 12 13 14 15
...   

Then j would be our (non zero-based) row number, that is, the greatest integer such that

j * (j - 1) / 2 < k

Solving for j:

j = ceiling ((sqrt (1 + 8 * k) - 1) / 2)

And i would be k's (zero-based) position in the row

i = k - j * (j - 1) / 2 - 1

The bounds for k are:

1 <= k <= n * (n - 1) / 2 

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.