8

Suppose I have a data.frame with several columns of categorical data, and one column of quantitative data. Here's an example:

my_data <- structure(list(A = c("f", "f", "f", "f", "t", "t", "t", "t"), 
                          B = c("t", "t", "t", "t", "f", "f", "f", "f"), 
                          C = c("f","f", "t", "t", "f", "f", "t", "t"), 
                          D = c("f", "t", "f", "t", "f", "t", "f", "t")),
                     .Names = c("A", "B", "C", "D"), 
                     row.names = 1:8, class = "data.frame")
my_data$quantity <- 1:8

Now my_data looks like this:

  A B C D quantity
1 f t f f        1
2 f t f t        2
3 f t t f        3
4 f t t t        4
5 t f f f        5
6 t f f t        6
7 t f t f        7
8 t f t t        8

What's the most elegant way to get a cross tab / sum of quantity where both values =='t'? That is, I'm looking for an output like this:

   A   B   C   D  
A "?" "?" "?" "?"
B "?" "?" "?" "?"
C "?" "?" "?" "?"
D "?" "?" "?" "?"

..where the intersection of x/y is the sum of quantity where x=='t' and y=='t'. (I only care about half this table, really, since half is duplicated)

So for example the value of A/C should be:

good_rows <- with(my_data, A=='t' & C=='t')
sum(my_data$quantity[good_rows])

15

*Edit: What I already had was:

nodes <- names(my_data)[-ncol(my_data)]
sapply(nodes, function(rw) {
  sapply(nodes, function(cl) {
    good_rows <- which(my_data[, rw]=='t' & my_data[, cl]=='t')
    sum(my_data[good_rows, 'quantity'])
  })
})

Which gives the desired result:

   A  B  C  D
A 26  0 15 14
B  0 10  7  6
C 15  7 22 12
D 14  6 12 20

I like this solution because, being very 'literal', it's fairly readable: two apply funcs (aka loops) to go through rows * columns, compute each cell, and produce the matrix. Also plenty fast enough on my actual data (tiny: 192 rows x 10 columns). I didn't like it because it seems like a lot of lines. Thank you for the answers so far! I will review and absorb.

  • 1
    Since you're asking for an "elegant" way rather than "any" way, would you mind posting what you have now? That way we don't end up rewriting code you've already written. – shadowtalker Sep 30 '14 at 23:59
  • 1
    Good point, editing to show what I already had – arvi1000 Oct 1 '14 at 1:47
6

Try using matrix multiplication

temp <- (my_data[1:4]=="t")*my_data$quantity

t(temp) %*% (my_data[1:4]=="t") 

#   A  B  C  D
#A 26  0 15 14
#B  0 10  7  6
#C 15  7 22 12
#D 14  6 12 20

(Although this might be a fluke)

|improve this answer|||||
  • Beauty! Thanks. Here's a way to get it even a tiny bit leaner on the page: tf <- my_data[, 1:4]=='t'; t(tf*my_data$quantity) %*% tf – arvi1000 Oct 1 '14 at 2:19
3

For each row name, you could build a vector dat that's just the rows with that value equal to t. Then you could multiply the true/false values in this data subset by that row's quantity value (so it's 0 when false and the quantity value when true), finally taking the column sum.

sapply(c("A", "B", "C", "D"), function(x) {
  dat <- my_data[my_data[,x] == "t",]
  colSums((dat[,-5] == "t") * dat[,5])
})
#    A  B  C  D
# A 26  0 15 14
# B  0 10  7  6
# C 15  7 22 12
# D 14  6 12 20
|improve this answer|||||
  • Thanks! Somewhat similar approach as I had in mind (with step 1 being row selection), but yours avoids the second sapply. Upvoted. – arvi1000 Oct 1 '14 at 2:26

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