76

I have this data frame diamonds which is composed of variables like (carat, price, color), and I want to draw a scatter plot of price to carat for each color, which means different color has different color in the plot.

This is easy in R with ggplot:

ggplot(aes(x=carat, y=price, color=color),  #by setting color=color, ggplot automatically draw in different colors
       data=diamonds) + geom_point(stat='summary', fun.y=median)

enter image description here

I wonder how could this be done in Python using matplotlib ?

PS:

I know about auxiliary plotting packages, such as seaborn and ggplot for python, and I donot prefer them, just want to find out if it is possible to do the job using matplotlib alone, ;P

129

You can pass plt.scatter a c argument which will allow you to select the colors. The code below defines a colors dictionary to map your diamond colors to the plotting colors.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import pandas as pd

carat = [5, 10, 20, 30, 5, 10, 20, 30, 5, 10, 20, 30]
price = [100, 100, 200, 200, 300, 300, 400, 400, 500, 500, 600, 600]
color =['D', 'D', 'D', 'E', 'E', 'E', 'F', 'F', 'F', 'G', 'G', 'G',]

df = pd.DataFrame(dict(carat=carat, price=price, color=color))

fig, ax = plt.subplots()

colors = {'D':'red', 'E':'blue', 'F':'green', 'G':'black'}

ax.scatter(df['carat'], df['price'], c=df['color'].apply(lambda x: colors[x]))

plt.show()

df['color'].apply(lambda x: colors[x]) effectively maps the colours from "diamond" to "plotting".

(Forgive me for not putting another example image up, I think 2 is enough :P)

With seaborn

You can use seaborn which is a wrapper around matplotlib that makes it look prettier by default (rather opinion-based, I know :P) but also adds some plotting functions.

For this you could use seaborn.lmplot with fit_reg=False (which prevents it from automatically doing some regression).

The code below uses an example dataset. By selecting hue='color' you tell seaborn to split your dataframe up based on your colours and then plot each one.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import seaborn as sns

import pandas as pd

carat = [5, 10, 20, 30, 5, 10, 20, 30, 5, 10, 20, 30]
price = [100, 100, 200, 200, 300, 300, 400, 400, 500, 500, 600, 600]
color =['D', 'D', 'D', 'E', 'E', 'E', 'F', 'F', 'F', 'G', 'G', 'G',]

df = pd.DataFrame(dict(carat=carat, price=price, color=color))

sns.lmplot('carat', 'price', data=df, hue='color', fit_reg=False)

plt.show()

enter image description here

Without seaborn using pandas.groupby

If you don't want to use seaborn then you can use pandas.groupby to get the colors alone and then plot them using just matplotlib, but you'll have to manually assign colors as you go, I've added an example below:

fig, ax = plt.subplots()

colors = {'D':'red', 'E':'blue', 'F':'green', 'G':'black'}

grouped = df.groupby('color')
for key, group in grouped:
    group.plot(ax=ax, kind='scatter', x='carat', y='price', label=key, color=colors[key])

plt.show()

This code assumes the same DataFrame as above and then groups it based on color. It then iterates over these groups, plotting for each one. To select a color I've created a colors dictionary which can map the diamond color (for instance D) to a real color (for instance red).

enter image description here

  • Thanks, but I just want to find out how to do the job with matplotlib alone. – avocado Oct 1 '14 at 10:58
  • Yes, via groupby I could do that, so there is such a feature in matplotlib that can automatically draw for different levels of a categorical using different color, right? – avocado Oct 1 '14 at 11:05
  • @loganecolss Ok I see :) I've edited it again and added a very simple example which uses a dictionary to map the colors, similarly to the groupby example. – Ffisegydd Oct 1 '14 at 11:12
  • @Ffisegydd Using the first method which is ax.scatter, how would you add legends to it? I am trying to use label=df['color'] and then plt.legend() with no success. – ahoosh Jul 6 '16 at 17:12
  • 1
    It would be better to change ax.scatter(df['carat'], df['price'], c=df['color'].apply(lambda x: colors[x])) to ax.scatter(df['carat'], df['price'], c=df['color'].map(colors) – Dawei Jun 6 '18 at 2:56
24

Here's a succinct and generic solution to use a seaborn color palette.

First find a color palette you like and optionally visualize it:

sns.palplot(sns.color_palette("Set2", 8))

Then you can use it with matplotlib doing this:

# Unique category labels: 'D', 'F', 'G', ...
color_labels = df['color'].unique()

# List of RGB triplets
rgb_values = sns.color_palette("Set2", 8)

# Map label to RGB
color_map = dict(zip(color_labels, rgb_values))

# Finally use the mapped values
plt.scatter(df['carat'], df['price'], c=df['color'].map(color_map))
  • 2
    I like your approach. Given the example above, you can of course also map the values to simple color names like this: 1) define the colors colors = {'D':'red', 'E':'blue', 'F':'green', 'G':'black'} 2) map them as you did: ax.scatter(df['carat'], df['price'], c= df['color'].map(colors)) – Stefan Jul 21 '17 at 6:54
  • 1
    How would you add a label by colour in this case, though? – François Leblanc Aug 1 '17 at 21:20
  • 2
    To add some more abstraction, you can replace the 8 in sns.color_palette("Set2", 8) by len(color_labels). – Swier Sep 12 '17 at 12:51
  • This is great, but it should be done automatically by seaborn. Having to use a map for categorical variables every single time you want to plot something quickly is incredibly hindering. Not to mention the idiotic idea to take out the ability to display stats on the plot. Seaborn is, unfortunately, declining as a package due to these reasons – chase Nov 16 '18 at 0:21
5

Using Altair.

from altair import *
import pandas as pd

df = datasets.load_dataset('iris')
Chart(df).mark_point().encode(x='petalLength',y='sepalLength', color='species')

enter image description here

5

Here a combination of markers and colors from a qualitative colormap in matplotlib:

import itertools
import numpy as np
from matplotlib import markers
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

m_styles = markers.MarkerStyle.markers
N = 60
colormap = plt.cm.Dark2.colors  # Qualitative colormap
for i, (marker, color) in zip(range(N), itertools.product(m_styles, colormap)):
    plt.scatter(*np.random.random(2), color=color, marker=marker, label=i)
plt.legend(bbox_to_anchor=(1.05, 1), loc=2, borderaxespad=0., ncol=4);

enter image description here

  • In mpl.cm.Dark2.colors - mpl doesn't seem to be defined in your code, and Dark2 doesn't have attribute colors. – Shovalt May 14 '17 at 8:55
  • @Shovalt Thanks for the review. I should have imported matplotlib as mpl, I have corrected my code by using plt which also contains cm. At least in the matplotlib version that I am using 2.0.0 Dark2 does have attribute colors – Pablo Reyes May 14 '17 at 17:26
  • 1
    Late, but if you do not have the colors attribute: iter(plt.cm.Dark2(np.linspace(0,1,N))) – Geoff Lentsch Jun 6 '17 at 11:43
4

I had the same question, and have spent all day trying out different packages.

I had originally used matlibplot: and was not happy with either mapping categories to predefined colors; or grouping/aggregating then iterating through the groups (and still having to map colors). I just felt it was poor package implementation.

Seaborn wouldn't work on my case, and Altair ONLY works inside of a Jupyter Notebook.

The best solution for me was PlotNine, which "is an implementation of a grammar of graphics in Python, and based on ggplot2".

Below is the plotnine code to replicate your R example in Python:

from plotnine import *
from plotnine.data import diamonds

g = ggplot(diamonds, aes(x='carat', y='price', color='color')) + geom_point(stat='summary')
print(g)

plotnine diamonds example

So clean and simple :)

1

With df.plot()

Normally when quickly plotting a DataFrame, I use pd.DataFrame.plot(). This takes the index as the x value, the value as the y value and plots each column separately with a different color. A DataFrame in this form can be achieved by using set_index and unstack.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import pandas as pd

carat = [5, 10, 20, 30, 5, 10, 20, 30, 5, 10, 20, 30]
price = [100, 100, 200, 200, 300, 300, 400, 400, 500, 500, 600, 600]
color =['D', 'D', 'D', 'E', 'E', 'E', 'F', 'F', 'F', 'G', 'G', 'G',]

df = pd.DataFrame(dict(carat=carat, price=price, color=color))

df.set_index(['color', 'carat']).unstack('color')['price'].plot(style='o')
plt.ylabel('price')

plot

With this method you do not have to manually specify the colors.

This procedure may make more sense for other data series. In my case I have timeseries data, so the MultiIndex consists of datetime and categories. It is also possible to use this approach for more than one column to color by, but the legend is getting a mess.

0

I usually do it using Seaborn which is built on top of matplotlib

import seaborn as sns
iris = sns.load_dataset('iris')
sns.scatterplot(x='sepal_length', y='sepal_width',
              hue='species', data=iris); 

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