359

I have been using ES6 Promise.

Ordinarily, a Promise is constructed and used like this

new Promise(function(resolve, reject){
    if (someCondition){
        resolve();
    } else {
        reject();
    } 
});

But I have been doing something like below to take the resolve outside for the sake of flexibility.

var outsideResolve;
var outsideReject;
new Promise(function(resolve, reject) { 
    outsideResolve = resolve; 
    outsideReject = reject; 
});

And later

onClick = function(){
    outsideResolve();
}

This works fine, but is there an easier way to do this? If not, is this a good practice?

6
  • 2
    I don't think there is another way. I believe it is specified that the callback passed to Promise has to be executed synchronously to allow "exporting" the two functions. – Felix Kling Oct 1 '14 at 20:44
  • 1
    This works for me exactly like you wrote it. So as far as I'm concerned, this is the "canonical" way. – Gilad Barner Jul 31 '16 at 8:40
  • 25
    I think there should be a formal way to achieve this in the future. This feature is very powerful in my opinion as you can wait for values from other contexts. – Jose Apr 3 '18 at 12:47
  • Whenever they come up with a proper solution to this problem, I hope they will also make it work for nested promises, some of which may recur. – Arthur Tarasov Jul 5 '18 at 8:02
  • I think the Promise API "suggest" to always use them as return values and never as objects that you can access or call. In other words force us to treat them as return values instead of objects we can access or functions we can call or something we can reference with a variable or pass as a parameter, etc. If you start using promises as any other object probably you will end up needing to resolve it from outside like in your question... That being said, I also think there should should be a formal way of doing this... and Deferred seems just a workaround for me. – cancerbero May 14 '19 at 7:44

22 Answers 22

160

simple:

var promiseResolve, promiseReject;

var promise = new Promise(function(resolve, reject){
  promiseResolve = resolve;
  promiseReject = reject;
});

promiseResolve();
7
  • 2
    @ruX, As the accepted answer mentions - it was designed this way on purpose. The point is that if an exception is thrown it will be caught by the promise constructor. This answer (as well as mine) has the pitfall of possibly throwing an exception for whatever code calls promiseResolve(). The semantics of a promise are that it always returns a value. Also this is functionally the same as OP's post, I don't get what problem this is solving in a reusable way. – Jon Jaques Jun 27 '16 at 20:30
  • 4
    @JonJaques I'm not sure if what you say is true. The code that calls promiseResolve() will not throw an exception. You can define a .catch on the constructor and no matter what code calls it, the constructor's .catch will be called. Here is the jsbin demonstrating how this works: jsbin.com/yicerewivo/edit?js,console – carter Jul 5 '16 at 22:26
  • 1
    Yeah, it's caught because you wrapped another promise constructor around it - Exactly the point I'm trying to make. However, lets say you have some other code that's trying to call resolve() outside of the constructor (aka Deferred object)... It could throw an exception and not be caught jsbin.com/cokiqiwapo/1/edit?js,console – Jon Jaques Jul 6 '16 at 13:26
  • 9
    I am not even sure it is a bad design. An error thrown outside the promise isn't supposed to be caught within the promise. It is perhaps an example of misconception or bad understanding, if the designer actually expects the error to be caught within. – KalEl May 11 '17 at 22:17
  • 11
    This exact construct is already mentioned in the question. Did you even read it? – Cedric Reichenbach Sep 30 '17 at 15:08
120

Bit late to the party here, but another way to do it would be to use a Deferred object. You essentially have the same amount of boilerplate, but it's handy if you want to pass them around and possibly resolve outside of their definition.

Naive Implementation:

class Deferred {
  constructor() {
    this.promise = new Promise((resolve, reject)=> {
      this.reject = reject
      this.resolve = resolve
    })
  }
}

function asyncAction() {
  var dfd = new Deferred()

  setTimeout(()=> {
    dfd.resolve(42)
  }, 500)

  return dfd.promise
}

asyncAction().then(result => {
  console.log(result) // 42
})

ES5 Version:

function Deferred() {
  var self = this;
  this.promise = new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
    self.reject = reject
    self.resolve = resolve
  })
}

function asyncAction() {
  var dfd = new Deferred()

  setTimeout(function() {
    dfd.resolve(42)
  }, 500)

  return dfd.promise
}

asyncAction().then(function(result) {
  console.log(result) // 42
})
8
  • 1
    Do notice the lexical scoping here. – Florrie Feb 2 '16 at 20:45
  • 1
    There is no practical difference in whether resolve|reject are assigned lexically or through bind. This is just a simple implementation of the jQuery Deferred object that has been around since 1.0(ish). It works exactly like a promise, except there is no throw safety. The whole point of this question was how to save a few lines of code when creating promises. – Jon Jaques Jul 13 '16 at 0:08
  • 2
    Using a deferred is the usual way to do this, I have no idea why this isn't higher – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 28 '17 at 22:21
  • 1
    Excellent answer! Was looking for the deferred functionality that jQuery offers. – Anshul Koka Mar 28 '17 at 22:16
  • 2
    Is Deferred deprecated? – Pacerier Oct 16 '17 at 1:34
117

No, there is no other way to do this - the only thing I can say is that this use case isn't very common. Like Felix said in the comment - what you do will consistently work.

It's worth mentioning that the reason the promise constructor behaves this way is throw safety - if an exception you did not anticipate happens while your code is running inside the promise constructor it will turn into a rejection, this form of throw safety - converting thrown errors to rejections is important and helps maintain predictable code.

For this throw safety reason, the promise constructor was chosen over deferreds (which are an alternative promise construction way that do allow what you're doing) - as for best practices - I'd pass the element and use the promise constructor instead:

var p = new Promise(function(resolve, reject){
    this.onclick = resolve;
}.bind(this));

For this reason - whenever you can use the promise constructor over exporting the functions - I recommend you do use it. Whenever you can avoid both - avoid both and chain.

Note, that you should never use the promise constructor for things like if(condition), the first example could be written as:

var p = Promise[(someCondition)?"resolve":"reject"]();
16
  • 2
    Hi Benjamin! Is there currently no better way of getting yummy promise sugar if we don't know when the promise will be fulfilled yet? Like some sort of asynchronous wait/notify pattern? Like for example, "store", and later invoke a Promise chain? E.g. in my particular case, I am on a server, waiting for a specific client reply (a SYN-ACK-kinda hand-shake to make sure the client successfully updated state). – Domi May 3 '15 at 13:17
  • 1
    @Domi check out q-connection and RxJS. – Benjamin Gruenbaum May 3 '15 at 14:09
  • 2
    How could do I the same using fetch API? – Vinod Sobale Apr 20 '17 at 5:05
  • 133
    Not common? I end up needing it almost every project. – Tomáš Zato - Reinstate Monica Jun 23 '17 at 15:24
  • 2
    As for the usecase consider you need to do something after an event is triggered and something else happened. You want to transform event into a promise and unite it with another promise. Seems like a generic problem to me. – Gherman Oct 24 '17 at 8:31
25

A solution I came up with in 2015 for my framework. I called this type of promises Task

function createPromise(handler){
  var resolve, reject;

  var promise = new Promise(function(_resolve, _reject){
    resolve = _resolve; 
    reject = _reject;
    if(handler) handler(resolve, reject);
  })
  
  promise.resolve = resolve;
  promise.reject = reject;
  return promise;
}


// create
var promise = createPromise()
promise.then(function(data){ alert(data) })

// resolve from outside
promise.resolve(200)
3
  • 5
    Thanks, this worked. But what is handler? I had to remove it to get it working. – Sahid Feb 1 '19 at 5:52
  • @Sahid when you run createPromise() you need to pass a function as argument to it. otherwise the code does not work. You could have an if statement and check for the validity of the handler argument before calling it. – Michael Mammoliti Sep 15 '20 at 18:22
  • Thanks for the code! But isn't it possible for some other code to call your .resolve before the callback sets it? I'm used to regular threads, not asynchronous events, so I might be a bit confused. – AnthonyD973 Oct 29 '20 at 1:22
24

I liked @JonJaques answer but I wanted to take it a step further.

If you bind then and catch then the Deferred object, then it fully implements the Promise API and you can treat it as promise and await it and such.

class DeferredPromise {
  constructor() {
    this._promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      // assign the resolve and reject functions to `this`
      // making them usable on the class instance
      this.resolve = resolve;
      this.reject = reject;
    });
    // bind `then` and `catch` to implement the same interface as Promise
    this.then = this._promise.then.bind(this._promise);
    this.catch = this._promise.catch.bind(this._promise);
    this[Symbol.toStringTag] = 'Promise';
  }
}

const deferred = new DeferredPromise();
console.log('waiting 2 seconds...');
setTimeout(() => {
  deferred.resolve('whoa!');
}, 2000);

async function someAsyncFunction() {
  const value = await deferred;
  console.log(value);
}

someAsyncFunction();

1
  • I really love this. Thank you. I'm using it as a custom defined component in my Express app, but it'd be great as an NPM module if you were willing to create one, or I could if needed. This approach is a great mashup of the new async / await and how the old Parse Platform used to approach promises en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parse_(platform) – Michael Kubler Aug 2 '20 at 18:44
15

Accepted answer is wrong. It's pretty easy using scope and references, though it may make Promise purists angry:

const createPromise = () => {
    let resolver;
    return [
        new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            resolver = resolve;
        }),
        resolver,
    ];
};

const [ promise, resolver ] = createPromise();
promise.then(value => console.log(value));
setTimeout(() => resolver('foo'), 1000);

We are essentially grabbing the reference to the resolve function when the promise is created, and we return that so it can be set externally.

In one second the console will output:

> foo
3
  • I think this is the best approach. The only thing is that the code could be a bit less verbose. – Adam Pietrasiak Sep 12 '19 at 11:52
  • Nice! Clever idea. +50 if I could. – Mitya Mar 12 '20 at 14:59
  • This is just what OP did. In fact you are re-inventing Deferred pattern over Promises, of course this is possible and your approach works (as the initial OP code), but this is not the best practice due to "throw safety reason" described in the accepted answer. – dhilt May 21 '20 at 2:37
11

A helper method would alleviate this extra overhead, and give you the same jQuery feel.

function Deferred() {
    let resolve;
    let reject;
    const promise = new Promise((res, rej) => {
        resolve = res;
        reject = rej;
    });
    return { promise, resolve, reject };
}

Usage would be

const { promise, resolve, reject } = Deferred();
displayConfirmationDialog({
    confirm: resolve,
    cancel: reject
});
return promise;

Which is similar to jQuery

const dfd = $.Deferred();
displayConfirmationDialog({
    confirm: dfd.resolve,
    cancel: dfd.reject
});
return dfd.promise();

Although, in a use case this simple, native syntax is fine

return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    displayConfirmationDialog({
        confirm: resolve,
        cancel: reject
    });
});
11

I'm using a helper function to create what I call a "flat promise" -

function flatPromise() {

    let resolve, reject;

    const promise = new Promise((res, rej) => {
      resolve = res;
      reject = rej;
    });

    return { promise, resolve, reject };
}

And I'm using it like so -

function doSomethingAsync() {

    // Get your promise and callbacks
    const { resolve, reject, promise } = flatPromise();

    // Do something amazing...
    setTimeout(() => {
        resolve('done!');
    }, 500);

    // Pass your promise to the world
    return promise;

}

See full working example -

function flatPromise() {

    let resolve, reject;

    const promise = new Promise((res, rej) => {
        resolve = res;
        reject = rej;
    });

    return { promise, resolve, reject };
}

function doSomethingAsync() {
    
    // Get your promise and callbacks
    const { resolve, reject, promise } = flatPromise();

    // Do something amazing...
    setTimeout(() => {
        resolve('done!');
    }, 500);

    // Pass your promise to the world
    return promise;
}

(async function run() {

    const result = await doSomethingAsync()
        .catch(err => console.error('rejected with', err));
    console.log(result);

})();

Edit: I have created an NPM package called flat-promise and the code is also available on GitHub.

9

You can wrap the Promise in a class.

class Deferred {
    constructor(handler) {
        this.promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            this.reject = reject;
            this.resolve = resolve;
            handler(resolve, reject);
        });

        this.promise.resolve = this.resolve;
        this.promise.reject = this.reject;

        return this.promise;
    }
    promise;
    resolve;
    reject;
}

// How to use.
const promise = new Deferred((resolve, reject) => {
  // Use like normal Promise.
});

promise.resolve(); // Resolve from any context.
8

Many of the answers here are similar to the last example in this article. I am caching multiple Promises, and the resolve() and reject() functions can be assigned to any variable or property. As a result I am able to make this code slightly more compact:

function defer(obj) {
    obj.promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        obj.resolve = resolve;
        obj.reject  = reject;
    });
}

Here is a simplified example of using this version of defer() to combine a FontFace load Promise with another async process:

function onDOMContentLoaded(evt) {
    let all = []; // array of Promises
    glob = {};    // global object used elsewhere
    defer(glob);
    all.push(glob.promise);
    // launch async process with callback = resolveGlob()

    const myFont = new FontFace("myFont", "url(myFont.woff2)");
    document.fonts.add(myFont);
    myFont.load();
    all.push[myFont];
    Promise.all(all).then(() => { runIt(); }, (v) => { alert(v); });
}
//...
function resolveGlob() {
    glob.resolve();
}
function runIt() {} // runs after all promises resolved 

Update: 2 alternatives in case you want to encapsulate the object:

function defer(obj = {}) {
    obj.promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        obj.resolve = resolve;
        obj.reject  = reject;
    });
    return obj;
}
let deferred = defer();

and

class Deferred {
    constructor() {
        this.promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            this.resolve = resolve;
            this.reject  = reject;
        });
    }
}
let deferred = new Deferred();
1
  • If you're using these examples in an async function, you'll need to refer to the promise property, when you want to use the value of the resolved promise: const result = await deferred.promise; – b00t May 9 '20 at 5:42
8

I find myself missing the Deferred pattern as well in certain cases. You can always create one on top of a ES6 Promise:

export default class Deferred<T> {
    private _resolve: (value: T) => void = () => {};
    private _reject: (value: T) => void = () => {};

    private _promise: Promise<T> = new Promise<T>((resolve, reject) => {
        this._reject = reject;
        this._resolve = resolve;
    })

    public get promise(): Promise<T> {
        return this._promise;
    }

    public resolve(value: T) {
        this._resolve(value);
    }

    public reject(value: T) {
        this._reject(value);
    }
}
1
  • I like this one. I would just change the signature from reject to reject(reason: any) – Bruno Marotta Feb 24 at 8:06
3

Our solution was to use closures to store the resolve/reject functions and additionally attach a function to extend the promise itself.

Here is the pattern:

function getPromise() {

    var _resolve, _reject;

    var promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        _reject = reject;
        _resolve = resolve;
    });

    promise.resolve_ex = (value) => {
       _resolve(value);
    };

    promise.reject_ex = (value) => {
       _reject(value);
    };

    return promise;
}

And using it:

var promise = getPromise();

promise.then(value => {
    console.info('The promise has been fulfilled: ' + value);
});

promise.resolve_ex('hello');  
// or the reject version 
//promise.reject_ex('goodbye');
5
  • 2
    Great... I'm just learning Promises but have been consistently puzzled by the fact that you don't appear to be able to resolve them "somewhere else". Using a closure to hide implementation details is a great idea... but in fact I'm not sure that's what you've done: rather than have "pseudo" private variables I'm pretty sure there's a way to completely conceal the variables which should be inaccessible... which is really what closures mean... – mike rodent Jul 3 '17 at 18:05
  • > A closure is a block of code that can be referenced (and passed around) with access to the variables of the enclosing scope. var _resolve, _reject; are the enclosing scope. – Steven Spungin Jul 3 '17 at 20:12
  • yep, fair enough. Actually it seems to me that my answer is overcomplicating things, and furthermore that your answer can be simplified: you just need to go promise.resolve_ex = _resolve; promise.reject_ex = _reject; ... still works fine. – mike rodent Jul 3 '17 at 21:03
  • "attach a function to extend the promise itself." - don't do that. Promises are result values, they should not provide the capability to resolve them. You don't want to pass those extended ones around. – Bergi Jul 4 '17 at 16:41
  • 2
    The question was how to resolve it outside of the scope. Here is a solution that works, and in our production we have actually had a necessary reason to do it. I don't see why solving the problem stated deserves a downvote. – Steven Spungin Jul 4 '17 at 20:46
3

Yes, you can. By using the CustomEvent API for the browser environment. And using an event emitter project in node.js environments. Since the snippet in the question is for the browser environment, here is a working example for the same.

function myPromiseReturningFunction(){
  return new Promise(resolve => {
    window.addEventListener("myCustomEvent", (event) => {
       resolve(event.detail);
    }) 
  })
}


myPromiseReturningFunction().then(result => {
   alert(result)
})

document.getElementById("p").addEventListener("click", () => {
   window.dispatchEvent(new CustomEvent("myCustomEvent", {detail : "It works!"}))
})
<p id="p"> Click me </p>

I hope this answer is useful!

2

Thanks to everyone who posted in this thread. I created a module that includes the Defer() object described earlier as well as a few other objects built upon it. They all leverage Promises and the neat Promise call-back syntax to implement communication/event handling within a program.

  • Defer: Promise that can be resolved failed remotely (outside of its body)
  • Delay: Promise that is resolved automatically after a given time
  • TimeOut: Promise that fails automatically after a given time.
  • Cycle: Re-triggerable promise to manage events with the Promise syntax
  • Queue: Execution queue based on Promise chaining.

rp = require("openpromise")

https://github.com/CABrouwers/openpromise https://www.npmjs.com/package/openpromise

1

I wrote a small lib for this. https://www.npmjs.com/package/@inf3rno/promise.exposed

I used the factory method approach others wrote, but I overrode the then, catch, finally methods too, so you can resolve the original promise by those as well.

Resolving Promise without executor from outside:

const promise = Promise.exposed().then(console.log);
promise.resolve("This should show up in the console.");

Racing with the executor's setTimeout from outside:

const promise = Promise.exposed(function (resolve, reject){
    setTimeout(function (){
        resolve("I almost fell asleep.")
    }, 100000);
}).then(console.log);

setTimeout(function (){
    promise.resolve("I don't want to wait that much.");
}, 100);

There is a no-conflict mode if you don't want to pollute the global namespace:

const createExposedPromise = require("@inf3rno/promise.exposed/noConflict");
const promise = createExposedPromise().then(console.log);
promise.resolve("This should show up in the console.");
1

I made a library called manual-promise that functions as a drop in replacement for Promise. None of the other answers here will work as drop in replacements for Promise, as they use proxies or wrappers.

yarn add manual-promise

npn install manual-promise


import { ManualPromise } from "manual-promise";

const prom = new ManualPromise();

prom.resolve(2);

// actions can still be run inside the promise
const prom2 = new ManualPromise((resolve, reject) => {
    // ... code
});


new ManualPromise() instanceof Promise === true

https://github.com/zpxp/manual-promise#readme

0

How about creating a function to hijack the reject and return it ?

function createRejectablePromise(handler) {
  let _reject;

  const promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    _reject = reject;

    handler(resolve, reject);
  })

  promise.reject = _reject;
  return promise;
}

// Usage
const { reject } = createRejectablePromise((resolve) => {
  setTimeout(() => {
    console.log('resolved')
    resolve();
  }, 2000)

});

reject();
0

I've put together a gist that does that job: https://gist.github.com/thiagoh/c24310b562d50a14f3e7602a82b4ef13

here's how you should use it:

import ExternalizedPromiseCreator from '../externalized-promise';

describe('ExternalizedPromise', () => {
  let fn: jest.Mock;
  let deferredFn: jest.Mock;
  let neverCalledFn: jest.Mock;
  beforeEach(() => {
    fn = jest.fn();
    deferredFn = jest.fn();
    neverCalledFn = jest.fn();
  });

  it('resolve should resolve the promise', done => {
    const externalizedPromise = ExternalizedPromiseCreator.create(() => fn());

    externalizedPromise
      .promise
      .then(() => deferredFn())
      .catch(() => neverCalledFn())
      .then(() => {
        expect(deferredFn).toHaveBeenCalled();
        expect(neverCalledFn).not.toHaveBeenCalled();
        done();
      });

    expect(fn).toHaveBeenCalled();
    expect(neverCalledFn).not.toHaveBeenCalled();
    expect(deferredFn).not.toHaveBeenCalled();

    externalizedPromise.resolve();
  });
  ...
});
0

Just another solution to resolve Promise from the outside

 class Lock {
        #lock;  // Promise to be resolved (on  release)
        release;  // Release lock
        id;  // Id of lock
        constructor(id) {
            this.id = id
            this.#lock = new Promise((resolve) => {
                this.release = () => {
                    if (resolve) {
                        resolve()
                    } else {
                        Promise.resolve()
                    }
                }
            })
        }
        get() { return this.#lock }
    }

Usage

let lock = new Lock(... some id ...);
...
lock.get().then(()=>{console.log('resolved/released')})
lock.release()  // Excpected 'resolved/released'
0

As I didn't find what I was looking for, I will share what I actually wanted to achieve when I ended in this question.

Scenario: I have 3 different API's with same possible response and therefore I would like to handle the completion and error handling of the promises in a single function. This is what I did:

  1. Create a handler function:
  private handleHttpPromise = (promise: Promise<any>) => {
    promise
      .then((response: any) => {
        // do something with the response
        console.log(response);
      })
      .catch((error) => {
        // do something with the error
        console.log(error);
      });
  };
  1. Send your promises to the created handler
  switch (method) {
    case 'get': {
      this.handleHttpPromise(apiService.get(url));
      break;
    }
    case 'post': {
      if (jsonData) {
        this.handleHttpPromise(apiService.post(url, jsonData));
      }
      break;
    }
    // (...)
  }
0

I would like to share something different, an extension to this topic.

Sometimes you want a "task promise" to be automatically re-created at the same address (property or variable) when it resolves. It's possible to create an outside resolver that does just that.

Example of a recurring promise with an external resolver. Whenever the resolver is called, a new promise is created at the same address/variable/property.

let resolvePromise;
let thePromise;

const setPromise = (resolve) => {
  resolvePromise = () => {
    resolve();
    thePromise = new Promise(setPromise);   
  }
}
thePromise = new Promise(setPromise);

(async () => {
  let i = 0;
  while (true) {
    let msg = (i % 2 === 0) ? 'Tick' : 'Tock';
    document.body.innerHTML = msg;
    setTimeout(resolvePromise, 1000);
    await thePromise;
    i++;
  }
})();

https://jsfiddle.net/h3zvw5xr

-1

first enable --allow-natives-syntax on browser or node

const p = new Promise(function(resolve, reject){
    if (someCondition){
        resolve();
    } else {
        reject();
    } 
});

onClick = function () {
    %ResolvePromise(p, value)
}

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