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I would like to understand the way git works from a architects point of view. How are files stored, how are versions kept and how do changes happen (branches, merges, etc.)?

I am not searching for information how to use it. (I already found a lot of pages with tutorials.) But I did not find any "behind the scenes" details, that would make me understand.

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    This is a good question, not sure why it is not constructive – user1132593 Aug 19 '15 at 20:20

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http://eagain.net/articles/git-for-computer-scientists/

http://www.loria.fr/~molli/pmwiki/uploads/Main/gitmanual.pdf Chap 7

Git From the Bottom Up

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    Git From the Bottom Up is the starting point for understanding the architecture. Linus's talk complements it well. – Paul Nov 4 '08 at 13:50
  • Updated the links. – RBz Jun 27 '16 at 16:12
  • "Git From Bottom Up" link is broken :( – elyashiv Feb 12 '17 at 9:41
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For me, the following three resources were very, very helpful, in this order:

  1. The Thing About Git explained why I should even care

  2. Git Magic explained how to get started

  3. Git The Basics [pdf] explained - graphically, and in detail - what happens when I add, remove, merge, etc.

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  • The Thing About Git is both fun and informative reading. – Emil Lundberg Jan 17 '12 at 20:28
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The Git Internals ebook has already been mentioned. I will point out that its author, Scott Chacon, gave a fantastic presentation about git at RailsConf 2008 that covers much the same ground as the book.

Said Scott now maintains http://git-scm.com/, which includes the Git community book, which is more of a usage tutorial than a technical description, but does include both a nice conceptual overview of the git data model in the introductory chapter and a detailed one in its closing chapter.

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The US$9 100+ page PDF book from PeepCode called Git Internals is fantastic. It's well written, uses great, clear visuals and is also a quick read. I absorbed as much free online material as I could but this book put me over the top.

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To understand how git works you need to read Pro Git book, fully available online for free.

Written by Scott Chacon, one of the guys behind GitHub.

I wrote my opinion about the book in a review at Amazon.

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  • +1: I am reading it for the past couple of days, everything is great so far. – Tushar Tyagi Jul 21 '12 at 8:02
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Assume we are living in a pre git era. And you want to write a version control system which is fast and better than the existing vcs. All you need is a great idea. At that moment of time the below article would be of much help.

http://tom.preston-werner.com/2009/05/19/the-git-parable.html

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There's a good Google tech talk: Linus Torvalds on git

OK, it's not something to read but it does cover some of the Git internals and design philosophy.

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I found these pages useful :

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  • Nice links, thanks for posting them. :) – Gerry Jan 14 '11 at 5:37
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I found this site when I googled "git architecture": http://speirs.org/2007/07/19/a-subversion-user-looks-at-git

Git has a mailing list: "majordomo@vger.kernel.org&body=subscribe%20git" (http://git.or.cz/#community)

And this wikipedia article may be helpful: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Git_(software)

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The git source code. :-)

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    First I had a line in my description that said: "And please something that is shorter than the source code" :) I decided to drop it, because I thought that was somehow obvious. ;) – MrFox Nov 4 '08 at 11:38
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    Nothing is ever obvious, especially when your primary target audience is primarily composed of geeks. ;-) – JesperE Nov 4 '08 at 13:06
  • But, MrFox, the sources aren't that hard to read, and they are the best place to figure out details that aren't documented. – Ben Collins Nov 4 '08 at 13:40
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One day I actually sat down and read the entire Git User's Manual. Turned out to be a good idea -- the manual is very helpful, explains a lot, and is quite clear and provides useful examples.

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This talk by Randal Schwartz gave me a pretty good overview.

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Wikipedia might get you started.

I do remember encountering some documents describing some of the internal architecture, so I know that they are out there. I just can't remember where they were...

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I've found the Git User Manual to be very enlightening.

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There are some interesting documents on the Documentation/technical directory of the git source code.

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