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I'm having problems understanding Entity Framework Code Firsts relationship creation, as I'm more used to the traditional way.

The one-to-many relationship seems clear to me: The childs only need a foreignKey ID property indicating to which Parent they belong.

public class Parent
{
   public int Id { get; set; }
   public virtual ICollection<Child> Childs { get; set; }
}

public class Child
{
   public int Id { get; set; }

   public int ParentId { get; set; } 
   public virtual Parent Parent { get; set; }
}

Now, I'm not quite sure how to properly create a many-to-many relationship. Probably, there is an additional table ParentChild necessary, so there is no need for (foreign-key) ID properties right?

public class Parent
{
   public int Id { get; set; }
   public virtual ICollection<Child> Childs { get; set; }
}

public class Child
{
   public int Id { get; set; }
   public virtual ICollection<Parent> Parents { get; set; }
}

Now, for the one-to-one relationship, I have no clue. public class Parent { public int Id { get; set; }

   public int ChildID { get; set; }
   public virtual Child child { get; set; }
}

public class Child
{
   public int Id { get; set; }

   public int ParentId { get; set; } 
   public virtual Parent Parent { get; set; }
}

Are the foreign ID properties even needed or can I just have a Child property in the Parent class and a Parent-type property in the Child Class? And is the virtual keyword allowed when I ommit the foreign key ID properties?

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I suggest you to have a look in the entity framework fluent api. One to one relation can be easily achieved with the fluent api. Explanation source. For fast reference:

 public class Student
    {
        public Student() { }

        public int StudentId { get; set; }
        [Required]
        public string StudentName { get; set; }

        [Required]
        public virtual StudentAddress StudentAddress { get; set; }

    }


    public class StudentAddress 
    {
        [Key, ForeignKey("Student")]
        public int StudentId { get; set; }

        public string Address1 { get; set; }
        public string Address2 { get; set; }
        public string City { get; set; }
        public int Zipcode { get; set; }
        public string State { get; set; }
        public string Country { get; set; }

        public virtual Student Student { get; set; }
    }

You can override OnModelCreating in your datacontext class.

 protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<StudentAddress>()
            .HasKey(e => e.StudentId);
        modelBuilder.Entity<StudentAddress>()
                    .Property(e => e.StudentId)
                    .HasDatabaseGeneratedOption(DatabaseGeneratedOption.None);
        modelBuilder.Entity<StudentAddress>()
                    .HasRequired(e => e.Student)
                    .WithRequiredDependent(s => s.StudentAddress);

        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
    }
0

With Entity Framework, you don't even have to specify the foreign key relations as it will deduce it from your model and create the tables accordingly. The only relation type you actually have to do something for is the 0..1 or 1 to 0..1 or 1.

Don't forget that the object model is way more permissive than the database model. You can have a property storing a collection in an object but not in a table.

You have to think differently as EF will do the work for you at the databse level and you will have access to all properties defines in your object model, even collection properties.

The rules I always use to get it done is the following :

If the cardinality of the relation is 0..1 or 1, use a reference to the other entity object as your property. If the cardinality is many, use a collection.

Here are some use cases :

1 to Many (many childs per parent) :

public class Parent
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    // Navigation property
    public virtual ICollection<Child> Childs { get; set; }
}

public class Child
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    // Navigation property
    public virtual Parent Parent { get; set; }
}

The result in the database would be a Table Parent with a single property (Id) and a table Child with two properties, the Id and the foreign key property automatically generated named Parent_Id (Table name then underscore, then the key property of the related class).

The Many to Many :

public class ClassA
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    // Navigation property
    public virtual ICollection<ClassB> ClassBs { get; set; }
}

public class ClassB
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    // Navigation property
    public virtual ICollection<ClassA> ClassAs { get; set; }
}

The result in the database would be a Table ClassA with a single property (Id), a table ClassB with a single property (Id) and a third table (the relation table for the many-to-many relation) with two properties (this Ids of both tables).

EF will deduce what it needs to in order to do the job so you don't have to be more specific then that.

Now for the only somewhat problematic one, the 1 to 1 :

public class ClassA
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    // Navigation property
    public virtual ClassB ClassB { get; set; }
}

public class ClassB
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    // Navigation property
    public virtual ClassA ClassA { get; set; }
}

Following the rule I gave at the beginning, this is what we would do. But in this case, EF has no way to know the direction of the relation... A 1-to-1 coule be either direction. We will have to let it know the direction using annotation (to me the easiest way compared to Fluent API).

public class ClassA
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    // Navigation property
    public virtual ClassB ClassB { get; set; }
}

public class ClassB
{
    [ForeignKey("ClassA")]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    // Navigation property
    public virtual ClassA ClassA { get; set; }
}

The annotation [ForeignKey("ClassA")], in ClassB tells EF to use the Id column from ClassB as the foreign key in ClassA.

The result in the database would be a Table ClassA with 2 properties (Id and ClassB_Id) and a table ClassB with a single property (Id).

You don't have to create the foreigh key properties yourself as EF will do it for you.

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