227

What's the JavaScript equivalent to this C# Method:

var x = "|f|oo||"; 
var y = x.Trim('|'); //  "f|oo"

C# trims the selected character only at the beginning and end of the string!

1
  • 2
    I'm so perplexed that the trim function isn't accepting an argument in ECMAScript. Aug 28, 2023 at 3:43

23 Answers 23

281

One line is enough:

var x = '|f|oo||';
var y = x.replace(/^\|+|\|+$/g, '');
document.write(x + '<br />' + y);

^     beginning of the string
\|+   pipe, one or more times
|     or
\|+   pipe, one or more times
$     end of the string

A general solution:

function trim (s, c) {
  if (c === "]") c = "\\]";
  if (c === "^") c = "\\^";
  if (c === "\\") c = "\\\\";
  return s.replace(new RegExp(
    "^[" + c + "]+|[" + c + "]+$", "g"
  ), "");
}

chars = ".|]\\^";
for (c of chars) {
  s = c + "foo" + c + c + "oo" + c + c + c;
  console.log(s, "->", trim(s, c));
}

Parameter c is expected to be a character (a string of length 1).

As mentionned in the comments, it might be useful to support multiple characters, as it's quite common to trim multiple whitespace-like characters for example. To do this, MightyPork suggests to replace the ifs with the following line of code:

c = c.replace(/[-/\\^$*+?.()|[\]{}]/g, '\\$&');

This part [-/\\^$*+?.()|[\]{}] is a set of special characters in regular expression syntax, and $& is a placeholder which stands for the matching character, meaning that the replace function escapes special characters. Try in your browser console:

> "{[hello]}".replace(/[-/\\^$*+?.()|[\]{}]/g, '\\$&')
"\{\[hello\]\}"
4
  • 1
    Replace the two ifs in the "general solution" with regex escape for it to safely support multiple characters: c = c.replace(/[-/\\^$*+?.()|[\]{}]/g, '\\$&')
    – MightyPork
    Mar 1, 2021 at 9:02
  • I think you'd better do the full escape to be safe, another character that will cause problems is -
    – MightyPork
    Mar 3, 2021 at 14:04
  • 1
    Oh, and it still doesn't support multiple characters. Imagine you want to trim tabs and spaces so you use "\t ", that sort of use case
    – MightyPork
    Mar 3, 2021 at 14:10
  • @MightyPork I tried with - (trim("-foo--oo---", '-')), and it doesn't seem to cause any problem. Anyway, The idea of trimming multiple types of space characters sounds interesting enough, I'm going to summarize your idea below the original answer.
    – user1636522
    Mar 4, 2021 at 14:43
81

Update: Was curious around the performance of different solutions and so I've updated a basic benchmark here: https://www.measurethat.net/Benchmarks/Show/12738/0/trimming-leadingtrailing-characters

Some interesting and unexpected results running under Chrome. https://www.measurethat.net/Benchmarks/ShowResult/182877

+-----------------------------------+-----------------------+
| Test name                         | Executions per second |
+-----------------------------------+-----------------------+
| Index Version (Jason Larke)       | 949979.7 Ops/sec      |
| Substring Version (Pho3niX83)     | 197548.9 Ops/sec      |
| Regex Version (leaf)              | 107357.2 Ops/sec      |
| Boolean Filter Version (mbaer3000)| 94162.3 Ops/sec       |
| Spread Version (Robin F.)         | 4242.8 Ops/sec        |
+-----------------------------------+-----------------------+

Please note; tests were carried out on only a single test string (with both leading and trailing characters that needed trimming). In addition, this benchmark only gives an indication of raw speed; other factors like memory usage are also important to consider.


If you're dealing with longer strings I believe this should outperform most of the other options by reducing the number of allocated strings to either zero or one:

function trim(str, ch) {
    var start = 0, 
        end = str.length;

    while(start < end && str[start] === ch)
        ++start;

    while(end > start && str[end - 1] === ch)
        --end;

    return (start > 0 || end < str.length) ? str.substring(start, end) : str;
}

// Usage:
trim('|hello|world|', '|'); // => 'hello|world'

Or if you want to trim from a set of multiple characters:

function trimAny(str, chars) {
    var start = 0, 
        end = str.length;

    while(start < end && chars.indexOf(str[start]) >= 0)
        ++start;

    while(end > start && chars.indexOf(str[end - 1]) >= 0)
        --end;

    return (start > 0 || end < str.length) ? str.substring(start, end) : str;
}

// Usage:
trimAny('|hello|world   ', [ '|', ' ' ]); // => 'hello|world'
// because '.indexOf' is used, you could also pass a string for the 2nd parameter:
trimAny('|hello| world  ', '| '); // => 'hello|world'

EDIT: For fun, trim words (rather than individual characters)

// Helper function to detect if a string contains another string
//     at a specific position. 
// Equivalent to using `str.indexOf(substr, pos) === pos` but *should* be more efficient on longer strings as it can exit early (needs benchmarks to back this up).
function hasSubstringAt(str, substr, pos) {
    var idx = 0, len = substr.length;

    for (var max = str.length; idx < len; ++idx) {
        if ((pos + idx) >= max || str[pos + idx] != substr[idx])
            break;
    }

    return idx === len;
}

function trimWord(str, word) {
    var start = 0,
        end = str.length,
        len = word.length;

    while (start < end && hasSubstringAt(str, word, start))
        start += word.length;

    while (end > start && hasSubstringAt(str, word, end - len))
        end -= word.length

    return (start > 0 || end < str.length) ? str.substring(start, end) : str;
}

// Usage:
trimWord('blahrealmessageblah', 'blah');
3
  • 6
    I prefer this solution because it is, in fact, actually efficient, rather than just short.
    – tekHedd
    Nov 22, 2019 at 21:12
  • 1
    I agree it should be preferred. Supersedes an answer I had given. Jan 22, 2020 at 11:43
  • If you wanted to go full C# trim replacement, you might present this answer as an extension method (prototype extension?)... String.prototype.trimChar = String.prototype.trimChar || function (chr) { // ... You might also sniff for trim(undefined, "|") if you don't make it an extension.
    – ruffin
    Apr 5, 2021 at 22:26
50

If I understood well, you want to remove a specific character only if it is at the beginning or at the end of the string (ex: ||fo||oo|||| should become foo||oo). You can create an ad hoc function as follows:

function trimChar(string, charToRemove) {
    while(string.charAt(0)==charToRemove) {
        string = string.substring(1);
    }

    while(string.charAt(string.length-1)==charToRemove) {
        string = string.substring(0,string.length-1);
    }

    return string;
}

I tested this function with the code below:

var str = "|f|oo||";
$( "#original" ).html( "Original String: '" + str + "'" );
$( "#trimmed" ).html( "Trimmed: '" + trimChar(str, "|") + "'" );
4
  • 11
    This would be a fun test for the garbage collector, but I wouldn't recommend subjecting your clients to it.
    – Sorensen
    Oct 20, 2019 at 19:05
  • 1
    Why I like this answer most is: I can read it and I can understand it. The garbage collector will work proper. And with this solution I can apply string instead of chars and I can still read and understand what it does without diving into Regex syntax.
    – Nasenbaer
    Sep 4, 2021 at 12:26
  • @Nasenbaer at least you would want to handle edge cases, where string has no more chars because all were removed. Not sure if string.charAt(-1) works the same on all current and future implementations in browsers.
    – SwissCoder
    Feb 16, 2022 at 9:19
  • One edge case that might be good to handle is if the passed string is undefined. Two ways to handle it would be adding at the top: string=String(string) ...or... if (!string) string='' each with slightly different behaviour... Aug 17, 2023 at 4:31
25

You can use a regular expression such as:

var x = "|f|oo||";
var y = x.replace(/^\|+|\|+$/g, "");
alert(y); // f|oo

UPDATE:

Should you wish to generalize this into a function, you can do the following:

var escapeRegExp = function(strToEscape) {
    // Escape special characters for use in a regular expression
    return strToEscape.replace(/[\-\[\]\/\{\}\(\)\*\+\?\.\\\^\$\|]/g, "\\$&");
};

var trimChar = function(origString, charToTrim) {
    charToTrim = escapeRegExp(charToTrim);
    var regEx = new RegExp("^[" + charToTrim + "]+|[" + charToTrim + "]+$", "g");
    return origString.replace(regEx, "");
};

var x = "|f|oo||";
var y = trimChar(x, "|");
alert(y); // f|oo
22

A regex-less version which is easy on the eye:

const trim = (str, chars) => str.split(chars).filter(Boolean).join(chars);

For use cases where we're certain that there's no repetition of the chars off the edges.

6
  • quite interesting... so split returns undefined element for equal to each delimiter that is split const trim = (str, chars) => str.split(chars).filter(x => { Boolean(x); console.log(typeof(x), x, Boolean(x)); }).join(chars); const str = "#//#//abc#//test#//end#//"; console.log(trim(str, '#//')); Jan 23, 2020 at 1:52
  • 1
    This doesn't work if there are duplicate chars in the middle of the string. trim("|first||last|", "|") returns first|last (only one pipe in the middle).
    – Cornelius
    Oct 10, 2020 at 6:32
  • You're right, that's what I tried to say with "no repetition of the chars off the edges".
    – mbaer3000
    Oct 11, 2020 at 9:07
  • Great solution! I need to clear path from leading and trailing slashes ```` path.split('/').filter(Boolean).join('/') ```` This works brilliant to me :-) Many thanks! Dec 1, 2020 at 22:51
  • 1
    this is not a trim, this is a char replace
    – albanx
    Oct 5, 2021 at 15:50
17

to keep this question up to date:

here is an approach i'd choose over the regex function using the ES6 spread operator.

function trimByChar(string, character) {
  const first = [...string].findIndex(char => char !== character);
  const last = [...string].reverse().findIndex(char => char !== character);
  return string.substring(first, string.length - last);
}

Improved version after @fabian 's comment (can handle strings containing the same character only)

function trimByChar1(string, character) {
  const arr = Array.from(string);
  const first = arr.findIndex(char => char !== character);
  const last = arr.reverse().findIndex(char => char !== character);
  return (first === -1 && last === -1) ? '' : string.substring(first, string.length - last);
}

16
  • 3
    I know regexes are overkill here, but why would you choose this particular implementation? Oct 8, 2018 at 14:54
  • 2
    this implementation because I personally find it well readable. no regex simply because the decision "tree" within regex engines is much bigger. and especially because the regexes used for trimming contain query characters which lead to backtracking within the regex engine. such engines often compile the pattern into byte-code, resembling machine instructions. the engine then executes the code, jumping from instruction to instruction. when an instruction fails, it then back-tracks to find another way to match the input. ergo a lot more going on than nec.
    – Robin F.
    Dec 14, 2018 at 11:12
  • 1
    @RobinF. you think findIndex() and reverse() does not contain loops? Think again.
    – Andrew
    Apr 14, 2020 at 16:25
  • 1
    Two annotations: A string containg only of the character to be trimmed will not be trimmed at all. The other point is: Exploding the string into an array with the spread operator will confuse babel and transform it into [].concat(string) which is not the desired outcome. Using Array.from(string) will work.
    – Fabian
    Jul 6, 2020 at 7:48
  • 1
    Why do we need whole reverse thing? Isn't arr.lastIndexOf(character) enough? Sep 1, 2020 at 14:26
13

This can trim several characters at a time:

function trimChars (str, c) {
  var re = new RegExp("^[" + c + "]+|[" + c + "]+$", "g");
  return str.replace(re,"");
}

var x = "|f|oo||"; 
x =  trimChars(x, '|'); // f|oo

var y = "..++|f|oo||++..";
y = trimChars(y, '|.+'); // f|oo

var z = "\\f|oo\\"; // \f|oo\

// For backslash, remember to double-escape:
z = trimChars(z, "\\\\"); // f|oo

For use in your own script and if you don't mind changing the prototype, this can be a convenient "hack":

String.prototype.trimChars = function (c) {
  var re = new RegExp("^[" + c + "]+|[" + c + "]+$", "g");
  return this.replace(re,"");
}

var x = "|f|oo||"; 
x =  x.trimChars('|'); // f|oo

Since I use the trimChars function extensively in one of my scripts, I prefer this solution. But there are potential issues with modifying an object's prototype.

1
  • 1
    var trimChars = (x, y) => x.replace(new RegExp(`^[${y}]+|[${y}]+$`, "g"),""); - one liner Apr 5, 2022 at 13:51
5
const trim = (str, char) => {
    let i = 0;
    let j = str.length-1;
    while (str[i] === char) i++;
    while (str[j] === char) j--;
    return str.slice(i,j+1);
}
console.log(trim('|f|oo|', '|')); // f|oo

Non-regex solution. Two pointers: i (beginning) & j (end). Only move pointers if they match char and stop when they don't. Return remaining string.

3

If you define these functions in your program, your strings will have an upgraded version of trim that can trim all given characters:

String.prototype.trimLeft = function(charlist) {
	if (charlist === undefined)
	charlist = "\s";

	return this.replace(new RegExp("^[" + charlist + "]+"), "");
};

String.prototype.trim = function(charlist) {
	return this.trimLeft(charlist).trimRight(charlist);
};

String.prototype.trimRight = function(charlist) {
	if (charlist === undefined)
	charlist = "\s";

	return this.replace(new RegExp("[" + charlist + "]+$"), "");
};

var withChars = "/-center-/"
var withoutChars = withChars.trim("/-")
document.write(withoutChars)

Source

https://www.sitepoint.com/trimming-strings-in-javascript/

1
  • Nice solution, just people be carefull about overrading native functions like trim. To avoid unexpected issues you could use different naming convention (String.prototype.MyOwn_trim) or just create simple function outside String.prototype.
    – gsubiran
    Dec 10, 2020 at 20:44
2

I would suggest looking at lodash and how they implemented the trim function.

See Lodash Trim for the documentation and the source to see the exact code that does the trimming.

I know this does not provide an exact answer your question, but I think it's good to set a reference to a library on such a question since others might find it useful.

4
  • 1
    @TamusJRoyce not the same
    – gdbdable
    May 29, 2020 at 22:25
  • @devi I can only agree. thank you for the comment. good answer looking into a community supported tool. May 30, 2020 at 3:59
  • lodash is MIT licensed. To make this a better answer, I'd suggest bringing in the source and presenting it with what was useful from it for you here. Then if that link changes, the good information remains in your answer.
    – ruffin
    Apr 5, 2021 at 21:40
  • The current trim implementation in lodash makes use of 6 other lodash functions, which again make use of other lodash functions too... If you go that path, you can just as well import lodash in your project.
    – SwissCoder
    Feb 16, 2022 at 14:11
0

This one trims all leading and trailing delimeters

const trim = (str, delimiter) => {
  const pattern = `[^\\${delimiter}]`;
  const start = str.search(pattern);
  const stop = str.length - str.split('').reverse().join('').search(pattern);
  return str.substring(start, stop);
}

const test = '||2|aaaa12bb3ccc|||||';
console.log(trim(test, '|')); // 2|aaaa12bb3ccc
0

I like the solution from @Pho3niX83...

Let's extend it with "word" instead of "char"...

function trimWord(_string, _word) {

    var splitted = _string.split(_word);

    while (splitted.length && splitted[0] === "") {
        splitted.shift();
    }
    while (splitted.length && splitted[splitted.length - 1] === "") {
        splitted.pop();
    }
    return splitted.join(_word);
};
0

The best way to resolve this task is (similar with PHP trim function):

function trim( str, charlist ) {
  if ( typeof charlist == 'undefined' ) {
    charlist = '\\s';
  }
  
  var pattern = '^[' + charlist + ']*(.*?)[' + charlist + ']*$';
  
  return str.replace( new RegExp( pattern ) , '$1' )
}

document.getElementById( 'run' ).onclick = function() {
  document.getElementById( 'result' ).value = 
  trim( document.getElementById( 'input' ).value,
  document.getElementById( 'charlist' ).value);
}
<div>
  <label for="input">Text to trim:</label><br>
  <input id="input" type="text" placeholder="Text to trim" value="dfstextfsd"><br>
  <label for="charlist">Charlist:</label><br>
  <input id="charlist" type="text" placeholder="Charlist" value="dfs"><br>
  <label for="result">Result:</label><br>
  <input id="result" type="text" placeholder="Result" disabled><br>
  <button type="button" id="run">Trim it!</button>
</div>

P.S.: why i posted my answer, when most people already done it before? Because i found "the best" mistake in all of there answers: all used the '+' meta instead of '*', 'cause trim must remove chars IF THEY ARE IN START AND/OR END, but it return original string in else case.

0

Another version to use regular expression.

No or(|) used and no global(g) used.

function escapeRegexp(s) {
  return s.replace(/[-\/\\^$*+?.()|[\]{}]/g, '\\$&');
}

function trimSpecific(value, find) {
  const find2 = escapeRegexp(find);
  return value.replace(new RegExp(`^[${find2}]*(.*?)[${find2}]*$`), '$1')
}

console.log(trimSpecific('"a"b"', '"') === 'a"b');
console.log(trimSpecific('""ab"""', '"') === 'ab');
console.log(trimSpecific('"', '"') === '');
console.log(trimSpecific('"a', '"') === 'a');
console.log(trimSpecific('a"', '"') === 'a');
console.log(trimSpecific('[a]', '[]') === 'a');
console.log(trimSpecific('{[a]}', '[{}]') === 'a');

0

Improved typescript version of @JasonLarke answer:

export const trimChars = (input: string, chars: string) => {
  let start = 0
  let end = input.length

  while (start < end && chars.includes(input[start])) {
    start += 1
  }

  while (end > start && chars.includes(input[end - 1])) {
    end -= 1
  }

  return start > 0 || end < input.length ? input.substring(start, end) : input
}

Usage:

trimChars(' .,hello;', ' ,.;') // -> 'hello'
-1

expanding on @leaf 's answer, here's one that can take multiple characters:

var trim = function (s, t) {
  var tr, sr
  tr = t.split('').map(e => `\\\\${e}`).join('')
  sr = s.replace(new RegExp(`^[${tr}]+|[${tr}]+$`, 'g'), '')
  return sr
}
-1
function trim(text, val) {
    return text.replace(new RegExp('^'+val+'+|'+val+'+$','g'), '');
}
-1
"|Howdy".replace(new RegExp("^\\|"),"");

(note the double escaping. \\ needed, to have an actually single slash in the string, that then leads to escaping of | in the regExp).

Only few characters need regExp-Escaping., among them the pipe operator.

-1

const special = ':;"<>?/!`~@#$%^&*()+=-_ '.split("");
const trim = (input) => {
    const inTrim = (str) => {
        const spStr = str.split("");
        let deleteTill = 0;
        let startChar = spStr[deleteTill];
        while (special.some((s) => s === startChar)) {
            deleteTill++;
            if (deleteTill <= spStr.length) {
                startChar = spStr[deleteTill];
            } else {
                deleteTill--;
                break;
            }
        }
        spStr.splice(0, deleteTill);
        return spStr.join("");
    };
input = inTrim(input);
input = inTrim(input.split("").reverse().join("")).split("").reverse().join("");
return input;
};
alert(trim('@#This is what I use$%'));

-2
String.prototype.TrimStart = function (n) {
    if (this.charAt(0) == n)
        return this.substr(1);
};

String.prototype.TrimEnd = function (n) {
    if (this.slice(-1) == n)
        return this.slice(0, -1);
};
2
  • It only remove one occurrence, but does not trim until the character is fully trimmed
    – KoalaBear
    Jan 26, 2018 at 9:35
  • 1
    Don't override the default string prototype or you're asking for trouble later on. Create your own separate functions elsewhere.
    – rooby
    May 16, 2019 at 2:00
-3

To my knowledge, jQuery doesnt have a built in function the method your are asking about. With javascript however, you can just use replace to change the content of your string:

x.replace(/|/i, ""));

This will replace all occurences of | with nothing.

3
  • 1
    is there a way to remove | only at the beginning / end?
    – fubo
    Oct 2, 2014 at 7:59
  • I actually think this post will get you the most up to speed on your question: stackoverflow.com/questions/20196088/… Oct 2, 2014 at 8:08
  • @fubo Sure... Throw in a $ like this for only at end: "||spam|||".replace(/\|+$/g, "") or a ^ like this for only at start: "||spam|||".replace(/^\|+/g, "")
    – ruffin
    Feb 20, 2018 at 19:45
-3

try:

console.log(x.replace(/\|/g,''));
-4

Try this method:

var a = "anan güzel mi?";
if (a.endsWith("?"))   a = a.slice(0, -1);  
document.body.innerHTML = a;

1
  • 1
    Why? What does this do? How does it work? Code-only answers are considered low quality on SO. Explain your answer so OP and any future visitors can learn from it. Sep 30, 2019 at 7:59

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