89

What's the JavaScript equivalent to this C# Method:

var x = "|f|oo||"; 
var y = x.Trim('|'); //  "f|oo"

C# trims the selected character only at the beginning and end of the string!

17 Answers 17

110

One line is enough :

var x = '|f|oo||';
var y = x.replace(/^\|+|\|+$/g, '');
document.write(x + '<br />' + y);

^\|+   beginning of the string, pipe, one or more times
|      or
\|+$   pipe, one or more times, end of the string

In a function :

function trim (s, c) {
  if (c === "]") c = "\\]";
  if (c === "\\") c = "\\\\";
  return s.replace(new RegExp(
    "^[" + c + "]+|[" + c + "]+$", "g"
  ), "");
}

s = ".foo..oo...";
console.log(s, "->", trim(s, "."));
s = "|foo||oo|||";
console.log(s, "->", trim(s, "|"));
s = "]foo]]oo]]]";
console.log(s, "->", trim(s, "]"));
s = "\\foo\\\\oo\\\\\\";
console.log(s, "->", trim(s, "\\"));

31

If I understood well, you want to remove a specific character only if it is at the beginning or at the end of the string (ex: ||fo||oo|||| should become foo||oo). You can create an ad hoc function as follows:

function trimChar(string, charToRemove) {
    while(string.charAt(0)==charToRemove) {
        string = string.substring(1);
    }

    while(string.charAt(string.length-1)==charToRemove) {
        string = string.substring(0,string.length-1);
    }

    return string;
}

I tested this function with the code below:

var str = "|f|oo||";
$( "#original" ).html( "Original String: '" + str + "'" );
$( "#trimmed" ).html( "Trimmed: '" + trimChar(str, "|") + "'" );
15

You can use a regular expression such as:

var x = "|f|oo||";
var y = x.replace(/^[\|]+|[\|]+$/g, "");
alert(y); // f|oo

UPDATE:

Should you wish to generalize this into a function, you can do the following:

var escapeRegExp = function(strToEscape) {
    // Escape special characters for use in a regular expression
    return strToEscape.replace(/[\-\[\]\/\{\}\(\)\*\+\?\.\\\^\$\|]/g, "\\$&");
};

var trimChar = function(origString, charToTrim) {
    charToTrim = escapeRegExp(charToTrim);
    var regEx = new RegExp("^[" + charToTrim + "]+|[" + charToTrim + "]+$", "g");
    return origString.replace(regEx, "");
};

var x = "|f|oo||";
var y = trimChar(x, "|");
alert(y); // f|oo
13

to keep this question up to date:

here is an approach i'd choose over the regex function using the ES6 spread operator.

function trimByChar(string, character) {
  const first = [...string].findIndex(char => char !== character);
  const last = [...string].reverse().findIndex(char => char !== character);
  return string.substring(first, string.length - last);
}
  • 1
    I know regexes are overkill here, but why would you choose this particular implementation? – Nicholas Shanks Oct 8 '18 at 14:54
  • 1
    this implementation because I personally find it well readable. no regex simply because the decision "tree" within regex engines is much bigger. and especially because the regexes used for trimming contain query characters which lead to backtracking within the regex engine. such engines often compile the pattern into byte-code, resembling machine instructions. the engine then executes the code, jumping from instruction to instruction. when an instruction fails, it then back-tracks to find another way to match the input. ergo a lot more going on than nec. – Robin F. Dec 14 '18 at 11:12
  • Thanks for replying, although I wanted you to explain why you'd choose this over other non-regex ways of doing it — I was hoping for more that just "I find it readable", I suppose. – Nicholas Shanks Dec 15 '18 at 16:44
  • :) sorry to disappoint but all the other solutions contain for loops (for with strl.length and index, for of, etc.) with a closure for saving the findings...you can look at some here: stackoverflow.com/a/41573058/5242207 also this solutions is quite fast since as soon as the index is found, the find functions stops iterating through the string. the reverse should come cheap on an optimization level too since we can just iterate from the back to the front and dont need to sort the array. – Robin F. Dec 15 '18 at 16:51
7

This can trim several characters at a time:

String.prototype.trimChars = function (c) {
  var re = new RegExp("^[" + c + "]+|[" + c + "]+$", "g");
  return this.replace(re,"");
}

var x = "|f|oo||"; 
x =  x.trimChars('|'); // f|oo

var y = "..++|f|oo||++..";
y = y.trimChars('|.+'); // f|oo

var z = "\\f|oo\\"; // \f|oo\

// For backslash, remember to double-escape:
z = z.trimChars("\\\\"); // f|oo
  • @fubo: No, not really. It's a demo, if you paste it in a console it will just print out the result. But I understand it can be confusing, so I have edited it. – marlar Dec 1 '17 at 12:21
3

A regex-less version which is easy on the eye:

const trim = (str, chars) => str.split(chars).filter(Boolean).join(chars);

For use cases where we're certain that there's no repetition of the chars off the edges.

3

Regex seems a bit too complex for a simple problem like Trim?

C#

var x = "|f|oo||"; 
var y = x.Trim('|'); //  "f|oo"

Javascript, x.TrimLeft('|') example - simple (but trims only single character)

var ltrim = "|";
var x = "|f|oo||";
var y = (x.startsWith(ltrim) ? x.substring(ltrim.length) : x); // "f|oo||"

var result = y;
console.log(y);

Javascript full example (thanks to @Tobo answer and @rooby suggestion)

class SutString extends String { // [S]tring[Ut]ility
  replaceFirstOnly(src, dest) {
    return new SutString(this.replace(src, dest)); // String.replace is misleading
  }
  replaceAll(src, dest) {
    return new SutString(this.split(src).join(dest));
  }

  reverse() {
    return new SutString(this.split("").reverse().join(""));
  }

  trimStart(delimiter = " ") {
    if (!delimiter) {
      return this.replace(/^\s+/gm, '');
    }

    var current = this; var index = this.length;
    while(current.startsWith(delimiter) && index >= 0) {
      current = current.substring(delimiter.length);
      --index;
    }
    if (typeof(current) === 'string') {
      return new SutString(current);
    }
    return current;
  };

  trimEnd(delimiter = " ") {
    if (!delimiter) {
      return new SutString(this.reverse().replace(/^\s+/gm, '')).reverse();
    }

    var current = this; var index = this.length;
    while(current.endsWith(delimiter) && index >= 0) {
      current = current.substring(0, this.length - delimiter.length - 1);
      --index;
    }
    if (typeof(current) === 'string') {
      return new SutString(current);
    }
    return current;
  };

  trimString(delimiter = " ") {
    if (!delimiter) {
      return this.trim();
    }

    return this.trimStart(delimiter).trimEnd(delimiter);
  };
}
// Pushes all functions and properties from String to SutString,
//   returning SutString if the result is a string
for(let prop of Object.getOwnPropertyNames(String.prototype)) {
  if (prop === "constructor" || prop === "toString" || (""[prop]) instanceof Function) {
    continue;
  }
  let newprop = prop;
  if (typeof(SutString.prototype[prop]) !== 'undefined') {
    newprop = "base_" + prop;
  }
  SutString.prototype[newprop] = function() {
    const result = this.toString()[prop].apply(this, arguments);
    if (typeof(result) !== 'string') {
      return result;
    }
    return new SutString(result);
  }
}
var str = new SutString("|f|oo||");
var strWhitespace = new SutString(" |f|oo||  ");

console.log("\"" + str.trimStart("|") + "\" ===", "\"" + str + "\".trimStart(\"|\");");
console.log("\"" + str.trimEnd("|") + "\" ===", "\"" + str + "\".trimEnd(\"|\");");
console.log("\"" + str.trimString("|") + "\" ===", "\"" + str + "\".trimString(\"|\");");

console.log("\"" + strWhitespace.trimStart() + "\" ===", "\"" + strWhitespace + "\".trimStart();");
console.log("\"" + strWhitespace.trimEnd() + "\" ===", "\"" + strWhitespace + "\".trimEnd();");
console.log("\"" + strWhitespace.trimString() + "\" ===", "\"" + strWhitespace + "\".trimString();");

I was a little lazy with trimStart and trimEnd. It would be more efficient to find how much of each side needs trimmed. Then call substring only once. But hopefully you get the idea and this is helpful!

Note: This is es6 specific. Some of this may be implemented for you in es2019.

  • Don't override the default string prototype functions though or you're asking for trouble later on. Create your own separate functions. – rooby May 16 at 1:59
  • Aren’t they uniquely named. Let me know which ones are dips of the native ones. Or I could use a polyfil pattern and only set them if they don’t already exist. Let me know! – TamusJRoyce May 16 at 2:01
  • 1
    trimStart() and trimEnd() are planned to be part of ES2019. You are of course free to add or override prototypes outside your own code, it's just an unnecessary risk IMO, since future changes to that prototype are outside your control and could cause problems. You lose nothing by defining them somewhere else. The polyfill approach is also valid, however if you don't implement to the spec you could see different behaviour in different browsers. – rooby May 16 at 9:02
  • But the functionality in yours is different because it supports more than just spaces. – rooby May 16 at 9:48
  • It is refactored to extend String instead of monkey-patching String through prototypes. That keeps it usable. Some refactoring to make SutString always match String functionality. – TamusJRoyce May 19 at 3:54
2

If you're dealing with longer strings I believe this should outperform most of the other options by reducing the number of allocated strings to either zero or one:

function trim(str, ch) {
    var start = 0, 
        end = str.length;

    while(start < end && str[start] === ch)
        ++start;

    while(end > start && str[end - 1] === ch)
        --end;

    return (start > 0 || end < str.length) ? str.substring(start, end) : str;
}

// Usage:
trim('|hello|world|', '|'); // => 'hello|world'

Or if you want to trim from a set of multiple characters:

function trimAny(str, chars) {
    var start = 0, 
        end = str.length;

    while(start < end && chars.indexOf(str[start]) >= 0)
        ++start;

    while(end > start && chars.indexOf(str[end - 1]) >= 0)
        --end;

    return (start > 0 || end < str.length) ? str.substring(start, end) : str;
}

// Usage:
trimAny('|hello|world   ', [ '|', ' ' ]); // => 'hello|world'
// because '.indexOf' is used, you could also pass a string for the 2nd parameter:
trimAny('|hello| world  ', '| '); // => 'hello|world'
1

This one trims all leading and trailing delimeters

const trim = (str, delimiter) => {
  const pattern = `[^\\${delimiter}]`;
  const start = str.search(pattern);
  const stop = str.length - str.split('').reverse().join('').search(pattern);
  return str.substring(start, stop);
}

const test = '||2|aaaa12bb3ccc|||||';
console.log(trim(test, '|')); // 2|aaaa12bb3ccc
0

To my knowledge, jQuery doesnt have a built in function the method your are asking about. With javascript however, you can just use replace to change the content of your string:

x.replace(/|/i, ""));

This will replace all occurences of | with nothing.

  • is there a way to remove | only at the beginning / end? – fubo Oct 2 '14 at 7:59
  • I actually think this post will get you the most up to speed on your question: stackoverflow.com/questions/20196088/… – Ole Haugset Oct 2 '14 at 8:08
  • @fubo Sure... Throw in a $ like this for only at end: "||spam|||".replace(/\|+$/g, "") or a ^ like this for only at start: "||spam|||".replace(/^\|+/g, "") – ruffin Feb 20 '18 at 19:45
0

expanding on @leaf 's answer, here's one that can take multiple characters:

var trim = function (s, t) {
  var tr, sr
  tr = t.split('').map(e => `\\\\${e}`).join('')
  sr = s.replace(new RegExp(`^[${tr}]+|[${tr}]+$`, 'g'), '')
  return sr
}
0

I like the solution from @Pho3niX83...

Let's extend it with "word" instead of "char"...

function trimWord(_string, _word) {

    var splitted = _string.split(_word);

    while (splitted.length && splitted[0] === "") {
        splitted.shift();
    }
    while (splitted.length && splitted[splitted.length - 1] === "") {
        splitted.pop();
    }
    return splitted.join(_word);
};
0

I would suggest looking at lodash and how they implemented the trim function.

See Lodash Trim for the documentation and the source to see the exact code that does the trimming.

I know this does not provide an exact answer your question, but I think it's good to set a reference to a library on such a question since others might find it useful.

0
function trim(text, val) {
    return text.replace(new RegExp('^'+val+'+|'+val+'+$','g'), '');
}
-1

try:

console.log(x.replace(/\|/g,''));
-1
String.prototype.TrimStart = function (n) {
    if (this.charAt(0) == n)
        return this.substr(1);
};

String.prototype.TrimEnd = function (n) {
    if (this.slice(-1) == n)
        return this.slice(0, -1);
};
  • It only remove one occurrence, but does not trim until the character is fully trimmed – KoalaBear Jan 26 '18 at 9:35
  • The prototyping was helpful. Thank you! – TamusJRoyce Apr 9 '18 at 3:52
  • Don't override the default string prototype or you're asking for trouble later on. Create your own separate functions elsewhere. – rooby May 16 at 2:00
-1

Try this method:

var a = "anan güzel mi?";
if (a.endsWith("?"))   a = a.slice(0, -1);  
document.body.innerHTML = a;

  • Why? What does this do? How does it work? Code-only answers are considered low quality on SO. Explain your answer so OP and any future visitors can learn from it. – Don't Panic Sep 30 at 7:59

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