Just like java.util.Optional<T> in Java 8 is (somewhat) equivalent to Scala's Option[T] type, is there an equivalent to Scala's Either[L, R]?

up vote 49 down vote accepted

There is no Either type is Java 8, so you need to create one yourself or use some third-party library.

You may build such a feature using the new Optional type (but read to the end of this answer):

final class Either<L,R>
{
    public static <L,R> Either<L,R> left(L value) {
        return new Either<>(Optional.of(value), Optional.empty());
    }
    public static <L,R> Either<L,R> right(R value) {
        return new Either<>(Optional.empty(), Optional.of(value));
    }
    private final Optional<L> left;
    private final Optional<R> right;
    private Either(Optional<L> l, Optional<R> r) {
      left=l;
      right=r;
    }
    public <T> T map(
        Function<? super L, ? extends T> lFunc,
        Function<? super R, ? extends T> rFunc)
    {
        return left.<T>map(lFunc).orElseGet(()->right.map(rFunc).get());
    }
    public <T> Either<T,R> mapLeft(Function<? super L, ? extends T> lFunc)
    {
        return new Either<>(left.map(lFunc),right);
    }
    public <T> Either<L,T> mapRight(Function<? super R, ? extends T> rFunc)
    {
        return new Either<>(left, right.map(rFunc));
    }
    public void apply(Consumer<? super L> lFunc, Consumer<? super R> rFunc)
    {
        left.ifPresent(lFunc);
        right.ifPresent(rFunc);
    }
}

Example use case:

new Random().ints(20, 0, 2).mapToObj(i -> (Either<String,Integer>)(i==0?
  Either.left("left value (String)"):
  Either.right(42)))
.forEach(either->either.apply(
  left ->{ System.out.println("received left value: "+left.substring(11));},
  right->{ System.out.println("received right value: 0x"+Integer.toHexString(right));}
));

In retrospective, the Optional based solution is more like an academic example, but not a recommended approach. One problem is the treatment of null as “empty” which contradicts the meaning of “either”.

The following code shows an Either that considers null a possible value, so it’s strictly “either”, left or right, even if the value is null:

abstract class Either<L,R>
{
    public static <L,R> Either<L,R> left(L value) {
        return new Either<L,R>() {
            @Override public <T> T map(Function<? super L, ? extends T> lFunc,
                                       Function<? super R, ? extends T> rFunc) {
                return lFunc.apply(value);
            }
        };
    }
    public static <L,R> Either<L,R> right(R value) {
        return new Either<L,R>() {
            @Override public <T> T map(Function<? super L, ? extends T> lFunc,
                                       Function<? super R, ? extends T> rFunc) {
                return rFunc.apply(value);
            }

        };
    }
    private Either() {}
    public abstract <T> T map(
      Function<? super L, ? extends T> lFunc, Function<? super R, ? extends T> rFunc);

    public <T> Either<T,R> mapLeft(Function<? super L, ? extends T> lFunc) {
        return this.<Either<T,R>>map(t -> left(lFunc.apply(t)), t -> (Either<T,R>)this);
    }
    public <T> Either<L,T> mapRight(Function<? super R, ? extends T> lFunc) {
        return this.<Either<L,T>>map(t -> (Either<L,T>)this, t -> right(lFunc.apply(t)));
    }
    public void apply(Consumer<? super L> lFunc, Consumer<? super R> rFunc) {
        map(consume(lFunc), consume(rFunc));
    }
    private <T> Function<T,Void> consume(Consumer<T> c) {
        return t -> { c.accept(t); return null; };
    }
}

It’s easy to change that to a strict rejection of null by simply inserting an Objects.requireNonNull(value) at the beginning of both factory methods. Likewise, adding support for an empty either would be imaginable.

  • 7
    Keep in mind that while this behaves like Either, the type is in some sense "too big", since your left and right fields could in principle both be empty or both be defined. You've hidden the constructors that would make that possible, but the approach still leaves potential for bugs in your implementation. In simple type arithmetic terms, you're trying to get a + b out of (1 + a) * (1 + b). Sure, a + b occurs in the result of that expression, but so is 1 and a * b. – Mysterious Dan Oct 2 '14 at 15:52
  • 6
    @Mysterious Dan: forbidding certain kind of state during object construction is the preferred way in Java. Otherwise you would have to invent a new “valid range” type for almost every use case of int as using the entire value range of int when using an int variable is the exception, just as an example. After all, Optional does the same, enforcing the invariants during object construction. – Holger Oct 6 '14 at 8:17
  • 1
    @Holger: Either.left(42).map(left -> null, right -> right) throws NoSuchElementException (correct) on this.right.get() (incorrect). Also, one can bypass the invariants enforcement and produce Either<empty, empty> by Either.left(42).mapLeft(left -> null). Or when put together, fail again on Either.left(42).mapLeft(left -> null).map(left -> left, right -> right). – charlie Jun 9 '16 at 11:52
  • 2
    @charlie: this solution does not consider that Optional.map allows the function to return null, turning it to an empty Optional. However, besides the opportunity to detect that and throw immediately, I don’t see any alternative solution that is “more correct”. Afaik, there is no reference behavior, as in Scala, you can’t map to null – Holger Jun 9 '16 at 12:05
  • 1
    @Holger: I agree there is no "more correct" way, I just didn't like the fact that the Right code path is executed at all for a Left instance, even though the error is the same. And yes, I'd prefer failing right away instead of receiving an <empty, empty> and failing later on. But again, it's all just a matter of a taste / style. – charlie Jun 10 '16 at 16:17

See Atlassian Fugue. There is a good implementation of Either there.

At the time of writing, vavr (formerly javaslang) is probably the most popular functional Java 8 library. It is pretty similar to lambda-companion's Either in my other answer.

Either<String,Integer> value = compute().right().map(i -> i * 2).toEither();

There is no Either in the Java Standard Library. However there is an implementation of Either in FunctionalJava, along with many other nice classes.

cyclops-react has a 'right' biased either implementation called Xor.

 Xor.primary("hello")
    .map(s->s+" world")

 //Primary["hello world"]

 Xor.secondary("hello")
    .map(s->s+" world")

 //Secondary["hello"]

 Xor.secondary("hello")
    .swap()
    .map(s->s+" world")

 //Primary["hello world"]

Xor.accumulateSecondary(ListX.of(Xor.secondary("failed1"),
                                 Xor.secondary("failed2"),
                                 Xor.primary("success")),
                                 Semigroups.stringConcat)

//failed1failed2

There is also a related type Ior which can act as an either or a tuple2.

  • disclosure I am the author of cyclops-react.

lambda-companion has an Either type (and a few other functional types e.g. Try)

<dependency>
    <groupId>no.finn.lambda</groupId>
    <artifactId>lambda-companion</artifactId>
    <version>0.25</version>
</dependency>

Using it is easy:

final String myValue = Either.right("example").fold(failure -> handleFailure(failure), Function.identity())

No, there is none.

Java language developers explicitly state that types like Option<T> are intended to be used only as temporary values (e.g. in stream operations results), so while they are the same thing as in other languages, they are not supposed to be used as they are used in other languages. So it is not surprising that there is no such thing as Either because it does not arise naturally (e.g. from stream operations) like Optional does.

  • 8
    Do you have a source on that? – akroy Sep 30 '15 at 20:50
  • 2
    @akroy, this seems to be correct, Brian Goetz wrote as much in this answer: link. – RonyHe Sep 1 '16 at 10:10
  • For me Either does arise naturally. Maybe I'm doing it wrong. What do you do when a method could return two different things? Like, Either<List<String>, SomeOtherClass>? – tamas.kenez Oct 20 at 13:14

There is a stand-alone implementation of Either in a small library, "ambivalence": http://github.com/poetix/ambivalence

You can get it from Maven central:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.codepoetics</groupId>
    <artifactId>ambivalence</artifactId>
    <version>0.2</version>
</dependency>

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