10

Preface: this question has been asked here, but I'm wondering specifically about the author's specific meaning.

I'm reading through Thinking in Java, 3rd ed. Revision 4.0, and Eckel shows this snippet in Chapter 4, Initialization and Cleanup:

public class ArrayInit
{
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    Integer[] a =
    {
      new Integer(1),
      new Integer(2),
      new Integer(3),
    };

    Integer[] b = new Integer[]
    {
      new Integer(1),
      new Integer(2),
      new Integer(3),
    };
  }
}

And states the following:

The first form is useful at times, but it’s more limited since the size of the array is determined at compile time.
The second form provides a convenient syntax to create and call methods that can produce the same effect as C’s variable argument lists (known as “varargs” in C). These can include unknown quantities of arguments as well as unknown types.

I've never known these to be different as Eckel describes. To my understanding, they are both arrays of static size. I don't understand how the first is any more "limited" than the second.

What's he talking about?

10
  • 2
    I have no idea what he's talking about; these are fully equivalent. Oct 2, 2014 at 20:17
  • 2
    Either you've quoted out of context or he doesn't know what he's talking about. (I'd put the odds at 50:50.)
    – Hot Licks
    Oct 2, 2014 at 20:18
  • 2
    I think this is an error on his book Jon Skeet knows what is going on
    – gtgaxiola
    Oct 2, 2014 at 20:19
  • 1
    Is it possible, that by “the second form” he actually means expressions like Integer[] nums = new Integer[n]; where n is a run-time expression? I cannot make sense out of the “C’s variable argument lists” thing because Java also has support for this, only that it is much more convenient and safe (and imho unrelated to this).
    – 5gon12eder
    Oct 2, 2014 at 20:21
  • 2
    I just checked the 4rth edition - now the text says after the example cited above - Although the first form is useful, it’s more limited because it can only be used at the point where the array is defined. You can use the second and third forms anywhere, even inside a method call. For example, you could create an array of String objects to pass to the main( ) of another method, to provide alternate command-line arguments to that main( ):.
    – Tirath
    Oct 2, 2014 at 20:30

3 Answers 3

4

I think this might be what the author is referring to.

Since Java 5, we can declare functions with variable argument lists.

public static int newStyleSum(final int... numbers) {
    int sum = 0;
    for (final int number : numbers) {
        sum += number;
    }
    return sum;
}

They can be used as in:

int s = newStyleSum(1, 2, 3, 4);

This feature is merely syntactic sugar. Internally, an anonymous array is passed to the function.

Before we had this syntax, the above example would have to be written as:

public static int oldStyleSum(final int[] numbers) {
    int sum = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; ++i) {
        sum += numbers[i];
    }
    return sum;
}

and called as

int s = oldStyleSum(new int[]{1, 2, 3, 4});  // "second" form

but not as

int s = oldStyleSum({1, 2, 3, 4});  // "first" form (syntax error)

which, even today, is still a syntax error.

And that might indeed be what he is talking about. Java 5 came out in 2004 so for a 2002 book, it makes sense.

The new syntax is more flexible and – importantly – backwards compatible, so we can still do

int s = newStyleSum(new int[]{1, 2, 3, 4});

or, more importantly,

int[] numbers = {1, 2, 3, 4};
int s = newStyleSum(numbers);

if we want to.

2

It seems he is referring to the array initializer, specifically new Integer[]. From the same chapter using the explicit initializer is given

Other.main(new String[]{ "fiddle", "de", "dum" }); 

to show the usefulness of passing an array to a method which is not possible without the array initializer expression

1

You're right, it doesn't make any sense.

Here's what rev 2 used to say:

This is useful at times, but it’s more limited since the size of the array is determined at compile-time. The final comma in the list of initializers is optional. (This feature makes for easier maintenance of long lists.)

"This" here refers to "initialize arrays of objects using the curly-brace-enclosed list", which is true. It looks like someone made a bad edit, thinking "this" referred to "the first form".

It goes on to say that the second form is a useful way of simulating varargs, which was true at the time, but Java has since gotten actual varargs. (The first form can only be used in array declarations, not in method calls, and is therefore not useful for varargs).

2
  • I'm reading from revision 4.0, and the text I put in my question is copied from that. What you're saying makes sense, though. Oct 2, 2014 at 20:46
  • @iAmMortos Ah, I didn't notice that. Yep, just a plain bad edit. Oct 2, 2014 at 21:59

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