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A bitwise OR (single pipe | ) produces a strange output for an undefined property (once it becomes NaN). As this post implies, ToInt32 is called internally on undefined, producing NaN. But why does NaN|largeNumber result in a large negative number if NaN | smallNumber results in a small number?

In action, (see console output): http://jsfiddle.net/4ev1asw7/6/

Here's the code:

var foo = {};
foo.date = 1412146800000; //some epoch timestamp as an integer
console.log( 'result: ' + foo.notDefinedThingy | foo.date ); // outputs -897440384 
console.log( 'to int 32: ' + parseInt(undefined) ); //outputs NaN
console.log( 'to int 32: ' + parseInt(undefined) | foo.date ); //outputs -897440384
console.log( 'Small number ' + parseInt(undefined) | 5 ); // outputs 5
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    Because you've exceeded the boundary for a positive 32 bit signed integer, and so it does the normal thing, which is to wrap around to the lowest possible number for a 32 bit signed integer, and keep counting up. The NaN is just treated as 0. – user1106925 Oct 2 '14 at 22:58
  • worksforme. that should be an answer so I can mark it up. – FlavorScape Oct 2 '14 at 23:00
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Because the operands are converted to 32 bit signed integers, and your right operand has exceeded the boundary for a positive integer, so it does the normal thing, which is to wrap around to the lowest possible number for a 32 bit signed integer, and keep counting up. The NaN is just treated as 0.

var highest = Math.pow(2,32)/2-1;      // 2147483647

var highest_plus_one = highest + 1;    // 2147483648
var highest_plus_two = highest + 2;    // 2147483649
var highest_plus_three = highest + 3;  // 2147483650

var all = [
  0 | highest,             // will be the expected number
  0 | highest_plus_one,    // will be the lowest number in range
  0 | highest_plus_two,    // will be the lowest number plus 1
  0 | highest_plus_three   // will be the lowest number plus 2, ...etc
];

document.querySelector("pre").textContent = all.map(function(n, i) {
  return "Highest + " + i + " = " + n;
}).join("\n");
<pre></pre>

| improve this answer | |
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this produces the same:

var a=new Int32Array(1);
a[0]=1412146800000;
console.log(a[0]); //-897440384

here i'm just forcing that same value you used into an Int32. that value needs 41bits, so it gets truncated and uses only the least significant 32 bit, wich have "1" as the most significant bit, and so represents a negative number

(1412146800000).toString(2); //"10100100011001010100000100010010110000000"
"10100100011001010100000100010010110000000".substr("10100100011001010100000100010010110000000".length-32); //"11001010100000100010010110000000"
parseInt("11001010100000100010010110000000",2); //3397526912
a[0]=3397526912;
console.log(a[0]); //-897440384
| improve this answer | |

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