6

I tried to modify executable file under gdb. Even though memory has been changed, but corresponding executable does not change, so next time run the program the modification is gone.

I started gdb with -write option. I also tried set write on and then reload exec-file I changed the memory with set {unsigned char}addr = 0xf;

but the corresponding file is not changed.

2
  • 1
    no you are changing the memory not the file. If you want to edit the file itself you'll have to open it with 'ofstream' or the like. – over_optimistic Oct 3 '14 at 5:49
  • can you be more specific? ? – Tianyi Cai Oct 4 '14 at 9:48
12

but the corresponding file is not changed.

It's hard to say what address you are actually modifying, and so whether your change should actually modify the binary or not.

In the past, I've found that after modifying the binary, I need to immediately quit. If I do anything other than quit (e.g. run), then GDB would discard my change, but if I quit, then the change would "take".

Example:

$ cat t.c
int main()
{
  return 42;
}

$ gcc t.c && ./a.out; echo $?
42

$ gdb --write -q  ./a.out
(gdb) disas/r main
Dump of assembler code for function main:
   0x00000000004004b4 <+0>:     55      push   %rbp
   0x00000000004004b5 <+1>:     48 89 e5        mov    %rsp,%rbp
   0x00000000004004b8 <+4>:     b8 2a 00 00 00  mov    $0x2a,%eax
   0x00000000004004bd <+9>:     5d      pop    %rbp
   0x00000000004004be <+10>:    c3      retq   
End of assembler dump.
(gdb) set {unsigned char}0x00000000004004b9 = 22
(gdb) disas/r main
Dump of assembler code for function main:
   0x00000000004004b4 <+0>:     55      push   %rbp
   0x00000000004004b5 <+1>:     48 89 e5        mov    %rsp,%rbp
   0x00000000004004b8 <+4>:     b8 16 00 00 00  mov    $0x16,%eax  <<< ---changed
   0x00000000004004bd <+9>:     5d      pop    %rbp
   0x00000000004004be <+10>:    c3      retq   
End of assembler dump.
(gdb) q

$ ./a.out; echo $?
22    <<<--- Just as desired
3
  • the "immediate quit" thing might be the trick. I accidentally modified the binary once, probably due to the "immediate quit". – Tianyi Cai Oct 5 '14 at 7:11
  • 1
    I just verified your "immediate quit" trick. It works. So after finding out where needs to change, QUIT gdb, restart gdb with option "--write", directly and immediately give command "set {some type}0x..=0x..", then immediately quit gdb, then binary is changed!. – Tianyi Cai Oct 5 '14 at 11:14
  • Question. Why unsigned char and not int? I notice that we manipulate a single byte. Is that somehow depending on the machine code generated? – Peter Oct 8 '20 at 13:04

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