162

I'm making my first step in ReactJS and trying to understand communication between parent and children. I'm making form, so I have the component for styling fields. And also I have parent component that includes field and checking it. Example:

var LoginField = React.createClass({
    render: function() {
        return (
            <MyField icon="user_icon" placeholder="Nickname" />
        );
    },
    check: function () {
        console.log ("aakmslkanslkc");
    }
})

var MyField = React.createClass({
    render: function() {
...
    },
    handleChange: function(event) {
//call parent!
    }
})

Is there any way to do it. And is my logic is good in reactjs "world"? Thanks for your time.

157

To do this you pass a callback as a property down to the child from the parent.

For example:

var Parent = React.createClass({

    getInitialState: function() {
        return {
            value: 'foo'
        }
    },

    changeHandler: function(value) {
        this.setState({
            value: value
        });
    },

    render: function() {
        return (
            <div>
                <Child value={this.state.value} onChange={this.changeHandler} />
                <span>{this.state.value}</span>
            </div>
        );
    }
});

var Child = React.createClass({
    propTypes: {
        value:      React.PropTypes.string,
        onChange:   React.PropTypes.func
    },
    getDefaultProps: function() {
        return {
            value: ''
        };
    },
    changeHandler: function(e) {
        if (typeof this.props.onChange === 'function') {
            this.props.onChange(e.target.value);
        }
    },
    render: function() {
        return (
            <input type="text" value={this.props.value} onChange={this.changeHandler} />
        );
    }
});

In the above example, Parent calls Child with a property of value and onChange. The Child in return binds an onChange handler to a standard <input /> element and passes the value up to the Parent's callback if it's defined.

As a result the Parent's changeHandler method is called with the first argument being the string value from the <input /> field in the Child. The result is that the Parent's state can be updated with that value, causing the parent's <span /> element to update with the new value as you type it in the Child's input field.

9
  • 16
    I think you need to bind the parent function before passing it on to the child: <Child value={this.state.value} onChange={this.changeHandler.bind(this)} />
    – o01
    Jun 2 '15 at 18:05
  • 19
    @o01 no you don't because I'm using React.createClass which auto binds all component methods. If I was using React es6 classes then you'd need to bind it (unless you were auto-binding in the constructor which is what a lot of people are doing these days to get around this) Jun 4 '15 at 8:34
  • 1
    @MikeDriver I see. Didn't know this was limited to cases utilising ECMAScript 6 classes (which I am). Also wasn't aware the React team recommends auto binding in the constructor.
    – o01
    Jun 4 '15 at 10:32
  • 1
    I don't know if they recommend it, but it seems to be quite a common thing I see. It makes more sense to me than putting the bind inside the render thread, reason being .bind returns a new function, so basically you're creating a new function every time you run render. This is probably fine, but if you bind in the constructor then you're only doing this once per component method at instantiation rather than every render. It's nit-picking... but technically nicer I guess! Jun 4 '15 at 10:38
  • 1
    @DavidLy-Gagnon well in the example it might be undefined as I've not appended isRequired on the propType. But yeah you could either do that or just check if it was defined or not instead. Aug 20 '15 at 6:40
70

2019 Update with react 16+ and ES6

Posting this since React.createClass is deprecated from react version 16 and the new Javascript ES6 will give you more benefits.

Parent

import React, {Component} from 'react';
import Child from './Child';
  
export default class Parent extends Component {

  es6Function = (value) => {
    console.log(value)
  }

  simplifiedFunction (value) {
    console.log(value)
  }

  render () {
  return (
    <div>
    <Child
          es6Function = {this.es6Function}
          simplifiedFunction = {this.simplifiedFunction} 
        />
    </div>
    )
  }

}

Child

import React, {Component} from 'react';

export default class Child extends Component {

  render () {
  return (
    <div>
    <h1 onClick= { () =>
            this.props.simplifiedFunction(<SomethingThatYouWantToPassIn>)
          }
        > Something</h1>
    </div>
    )
  }
}

Simplified stateless child as ES6 constant

import React from 'react';

const Child = (props) => {
  return (
    <div>
    <h1 onClick= { () =>
        props.es6Function(<SomethingThatYouWantToPassIn>)
      }
      > Something</h1>
    </div>
  )

}
export default Child;
3
  • 1
    This will be props.es6Function not this.props.es6Function Jan 18 at 8:34
  • @SalmanShariati what if I want to call a parent method from a child component , using functional/stateless components and not classes. Jan 30 at 4:20
  • @FerhiMalek it would be the same you just need to pass the parent functions in the props of the child when invoking it. In the child component you just need to specify you receive the props param
    – svelandiag
    Mar 29 at 20:55
54

You can use any parent methods. For this you should to send this methods from you parent to you child like any simple value. And you can use many methods from the parent at one time. For example:

var Parent = React.createClass({
    someMethod: function(value) {
        console.log("value from child", value)
    },
    someMethod2: function(value) {
        console.log("second method used", value)
    },
    render: function() {
      return (<Child someMethod={this.someMethod} someMethod2={this.someMethod2} />);
    }
});

And use it into the Child like this (for any actions or into any child methods):

var Child = React.createClass({
    getInitialState: function() {
      return {
        value: 'bar'
      }
    },
    render: function() {
      return (<input type="text" value={this.state.value} onClick={this.props.someMethod} onChange={this.props.someMethod2} />);
    }
});
4
  • 1
    Brilliant answer. No idea you could pass methods down as props like this, I've been using refs to achieve this! Apr 25 '18 at 13:46
  • 1
    I got the callback to be called by the child but there this.props in the callback becomes undefined.
    – khateeb
    Sep 5 '18 at 9:09
  • You should send this callback from parent to child (try to bind this callback with this) Sep 5 '18 at 12:23
  • Hi Valentin Petkov. Welcome! May 7 '20 at 13:23
7

Using Function || stateless component

Parent Component

 import React from "react";
 import ChildComponent from "./childComponent";

 export default function Parent(){

 const handleParentFun = (value) =>{
   console.log("Call to Parent Component!",value);
 }
 return (<>
           This is Parent Component
           <ChildComponent 
             handleParentFun={(value)=>{
               console.log("your value -->",value);
               handleParentFun(value);
             }}
           />
        </>);
}

Child Component

import React from "react";


export default function ChildComponent(props){
  return(
         <> This is Child Component 
          <button onClick={props.handleParentFun("YoureValue")}>
            Call to Parent Component Function
          </button>
         </>
        );
}
4
  • 1
    To add value to your answer consider adding a short explanation on what this code does.
    – Cray
    Feb 19 '20 at 9:46
  • when you click button in child component then Call to Parent Component function via props. Feb 22 '20 at 16:08
  • 1
    What if the function has parameters? How do you pass the parameters to the parent?
    – alex351
    May 24 '20 at 21:53
  • yes! @alex351 we can handle that scenario. In Child Component --> onClick={props.handleParentFun("YoureValue")} In parent Component --> handleParentFun={(value)=>{ console.log(); handleChildFun(value); }} Jun 19 '20 at 6:35
3

Pass the method from Parent component down as a prop to your Child component. ie:

export default class Parent extends Component {
  state = {
    word: ''
  }

  handleCall = () => {
    this.setState({ word: 'bar' })
  }

  render() {
    const { word } = this.state
    return <Child handler={this.handleCall} word={word} />
  }
}

const Child = ({ handler, word }) => (
<span onClick={handler}>Foo{word}</span>
)
1

React 16+

Child Component

import React from 'react'

class ChildComponent extends React.Component
{
    constructor(props){
        super(props);       
    }

    render()
    {
        return <div>
            <button onClick={()=>this.props.greetChild('child')}>Call parent Component</button>
        </div>
    }
}

export default ChildComponent;

Parent Component

import React from "react";
import ChildComponent from "./childComponent";

class MasterComponent extends React.Component
{
    constructor(props)
    {
        super(props);
        this.state={
            master:'master',
            message:''
        }
        this.greetHandler=this.greetHandler.bind(this);
    }

    greetHandler(childName){
        if(typeof(childName)=='object')
        {
            this.setState({            
                message:`this is ${this.state.master}`
            });
        }
        else
        {
            this.setState({            
                message:`this is ${childName}`
            });
        }

    }

    render()
    {
        return <div>
           <p> {this.state.message}</p>
            <button onClick={this.greetHandler}>Click Me</button>
            <ChildComponent greetChild={this.greetHandler}></ChildComponent>
        </div>
    }
}
export default  MasterComponent;
1
  • Pretty sure your Child component here is a Class component, not functional, I'm new to React so lemme know if I'm wrong
    – Jason
    Oct 14 '20 at 3:05

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