5

I would like to know if it's possible for expressions that are part of the SELECT statement list to be evaluated for rows not matching the WHERE clause?

From the execution order documented here, it seems that the SELECT gets evaluated long after the WHERE, however I ran into a very weird problem with a real-life query similar to the query below.

To put you in context, in the example, the SomeOtherTable has a a_varchar column which always contains numerical values for the code 105, but may contain non-numerical values for other codes.

The query statement works:

    SELECT an_id, an_integer FROM SomeTable

    UNION ALL

    SELECT an_id, CAST(a_varchar AS int)
    FROM SomeOtherTable
    WHERE code = 105

The following query complains about being unable to cast a_varchar to int:

SELECT 1
FROM (
    SELECT an_id, an_integer FROM SomeTable

    UNION ALL

    SELECT an_id, CAST(a_varchar AS int)
    FROM SomeOtherTable
    WHERE code = 105
) i
INNER JOIN AnotherOne a
    ON a.an_id = i.an_id

And finally, the following query works:

SELECT 1
FROM (
    SELECT an_id, an_integer FROM SomeTable

    UNION ALL

    SELECT 
        an_id, 
        CASE code WHEN 105 THEN CAST(a_varchar AS int) ELSE NULL END
    FROM SomeOtherTable
    WHERE code = 105
) i
INNER JOIN AnotherOne a
    ON a.an_id = i.an_id

Therefore, the only explanation I could find was that with the JOIN, the query gets optimized differently in a way that CAST(a_varchar AS int) gets executed even if code <> 105.

The queries are run against SQL SERVER 2008.

  • Yes, expressions can (and will) be evaluated regardless of WHERE clause. Like you discovered yourself, use CASE expressions. – Arvo Oct 3 '14 at 13:45
  • Actually, the oddest thing about this is that column reduction should have eliminated all of the column expressions entirely. Other than that this is (unfortunately) not unexpected behavior. Proper bracketing of expressions with CASE is the SOP way around it (almost always works). – RBarryYoung Oct 3 '14 at 13:47
  • I would be curious if you have the same problem without the union. I have a sneaking suspicion that the UNION ALL is evaluating the data types in the select and seeing one as varchar and giving up before it realizes you're doing a cast. WHEN Contained within a sub query. So can you try without the first select and union. IN addition instead of creating a materialized subquery, this may work with a CTE... – xQbert Oct 3 '14 at 13:47
  • @xQbert No this is no bug (except possibly the column reduction thing I mentioned above). This is just how it works. – RBarryYoung Oct 3 '14 at 13:49
  • @Rbarryyoung Excellent Learned something new; although, then why does his first statement work then? – xQbert Oct 3 '14 at 13:51
6

Absolutely.

The documentation that you reference has a section called Logical Processing Order of the SELECT statement. This is not the physical processing order. It explains how the query itself is interpreted. For instance, an alias defined in the select clause cannot be references in the where clause, because the where clause is logically processed first.

In fact, SQL Server has the ability to optimize queries by doing various data transformation operations when it reads the data. This is a nice performance benefit, because the data is in memory, locally, and the operations can simply be done in place. However, the following can fail with a run-time error:

select cast(a_varchar as int)
from table t
where a_varchar not like '%[^0-9]%';

The filter is applied after the attempt at conversion, in the real process flow. I happen to consider this a bug; presumably, the folks at Microsoft do not think so, because they have not bothered to fix this.

Two workarounds are available. The first is try_convert(), which does conversions and returns NULL for a failure instead of a run-time error. The second is the case statement:

select (case when a_varchar not like '%[^0-9]%' then cast(a_varchar as int) end)
from table t
where a_varchar not like '%[^0-9]%';
  • I think that try_convert(..) is only available in SQL Server 2012 and later. – RBarryYoung Oct 3 '14 at 13:52
  • Yes it's definitely an odd behavior. I really do not see how interpreting expressions that wouldn't need to be would lead to better performance. Do you have any official documentation about physical processing order? – plalx Oct 3 '14 at 13:55
  • @plalx . . . This starts by understanding execution plans (one place to start: sqlmag.com/t-sql/understanding-query-plans). As for performance, moving data around has a much bigger effect on performance than doing most calculations on data already in memory. I don't know if Microsoft explains this particular optimization, but it seems quite reasonable to me -- except for the impact it has on the semantics of the query. – Gordon Linoff Oct 3 '14 at 16:48

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