363

I just noticed that you can not use standard math operators on an enum such as ++ or +=

So what is the best way to iterate through all of the values in a C++ enum?

5
  • 2
    One of many approaches: When enum Just Isn't Enough: Enumeration Classes for C++. And, if you want something more encapsulated, try this approach from James Kanze. Nov 4 '08 at 16:22
  • Linked items have some interesting responses.
    – Tony
    Jun 13 '13 at 1:27
  • 1
    These answers don't seem to cover the problem that int may not be big enough! ([C++03: 7.2/5]) Jun 21 '13 at 10:03
  • Interestingly, you can define operator++ on enums; however, so you can do for(Enum_E e = (Enum_E)0; e < ENUM_COUNT; e++). Note you have to cast 0 to Enum_E because C++ forbids assignment operators on enums.
    – weberc2
    Jun 25 '14 at 22:52
  • If there was a compile time operator, similar to the way sizeof works, that could emit a std::initializer_list literal comprised of the values of the enum, we would have a solution and would not involve any runtime overhead.
    – jbruni
    Dec 13 '17 at 23:56

24 Answers 24

297

The typical way is as follows:

enum Foo {
  One,
  Two,
  Three,
  Last
};

for ( int fooInt = One; fooInt != Last; fooInt++ )
{
   Foo foo = static_cast<Foo>(fooInt);
   // ...
}

Please note, the enum Last is meant to be skipped by the iteration. Utilizing this "fake" Last enum, you don't have to update your terminating condition in the for loop to the last "real" enum each time you want to add a new enum. If you want to add more enums later, just add them before Last. The loop in this example will still work.

Of course, this breaks down if the enum values are specified:

enum Foo {
  One = 1,
  Two = 9,
  Three = 4,
  Last
};

This illustrates that an enum is not really meant to iterate through. The typical way to deal with an enum is to use it in a switch statement.

switch ( foo )
{
    case One:
        // ..
        break;
    case Two:  // intentional fall-through
    case Three:
        // ..
        break;
    case Four:
        // ..
        break;
     default:
        assert( ! "Invalid Foo enum value" );
        break;
}

If you really want to enumerate, stuff the enum values in a vector and iterate over that. This will properly deal with the specified enum values as well.

11
  • 15
    Note that, in the first part of the example, if you want to use 'i' as a Foo enum and not an int, you will need to static cast it like: static_cast<Foo>(i)
    – Clayton
    Mar 17 '09 at 22:30
  • 5
    Also you are skipping Last in the loop. Should be <= Last
    – Tony
    Jun 13 '13 at 1:24
  • 25
    @Tony Last is meant to be skipped. If you want to add more enums later, add them before Last... the loop in the first example will still work. By utilizing a "fake" Last enum, you don't have to update your terminating condition in the for loop to the last "real" enum each time you want to add a new enum.
    – timidpueo
    Aug 3 '13 at 21:06
  • 1
    Note that for this enum definition to be safe for updates one should define a value UNKNOWN = 0. Additionally, I would suggest to just drop the default case when switching over enum values since it might hide cases where handling of values was forgotten until runtime. Instead one should hardcode all values and use the UNKNOWN field to detect incompatibilities. Apr 13 '17 at 15:08
  • 1
    @timidpueo That's why I prefer to call the last entry Count. Makes it a little more obvious.
    – Cerno
    Aug 14 '20 at 8:27
70
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

namespace MyEnum
{
  enum Type
  {
    a = 100,
    b = 220,
    c = -1
  };

  static const Type All[] = { a, b, c };
}

void fun( const MyEnum::Type e )
{
  std::cout << e << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
  // all
  for ( const auto e : MyEnum::All )
    fun( e );

  // some
  for ( const auto e : { MyEnum::a, MyEnum::b } )
    fun( e );

  // all
  std::for_each( std::begin( MyEnum::All ), std::end( MyEnum::All ), fun );

  return 0;
}
3
  • Thanks! Note that if you're crossing files/classes and if MS compatibility is giving you issues with header-declared non-integer constants, it helps under my compiler to explicitly put the size in the type in the header: static const Type All[3]; and then I'm able to initialize in the source: const MyEnum::Type MyEnum::All[3] = { a, b, c }; Before doing that, I was getting obnoxious Error in range-based for... errors (because the array had an unknown size). Figured this out thanks to a related answer
    – sage
    Mar 4 '15 at 5:47
  • 1
    The array version is very friendly of copy paste. The most satisfactory answer besides, "NO" or "only for sequential". Probably macro friendly even. Sep 29 '16 at 15:14
  • 2
    this might be a good solution for enums with small number of items, but for enums with big number of items it must not fit well.
    – kato2
    Sep 4 '19 at 15:48
27

With c++11, there actually is an alternative: writing a simple templatized custom iterator.

let's assume your enum is

enum class foo {
  one,
  two,
  three
};

This generic code will do the trick, quite efficiently - place in a generic header, it'll serve you for any enum you may need to iterate over:

#include <type_traits>
template < typename C, C beginVal, C endVal>
class Iterator {
  typedef typename std::underlying_type<C>::type val_t;
  int val;
public:
  Iterator(const C & f) : val(static_cast<val_t>(f)) {}
  Iterator() : val(static_cast<val_t>(beginVal)) {}
  Iterator operator++() {
    ++val;
    return *this;
  }
  C operator*() { return static_cast<C>(val); }
  Iterator begin() { return *this; } //default ctor is good
  Iterator end() {
      static const Iterator endIter=++Iterator(endVal); // cache it
      return endIter;
  }
  bool operator!=(const Iterator& i) { return val != i.val; }
};

You'll need to specialize it

typedef Iterator<foo, foo::one, foo::three> fooIterator;

And then you can iterate using range-for

for (foo i : fooIterator() ) { //notice the parentheses!
   do_stuff(i);
}

The assumption that you don't have gaps in your enum is still true; there is no assumption on the number of bits actually needed to store the enum value (thanks to std::underlying_type)

14
  • 1
    @lepe ? You just make a different typedef for a different enum. Sep 24 '15 at 21:49
  • 3
    @lepe That's like saying that std::vector isn't generic because std::vector<foo> is tied to foo. Dec 2 '15 at 21:15
  • 1
    typedef Iterator<color, color::green, color::red> colorIterator; Make sure you understand how the template instantiations work. Dec 3 '15 at 17:12
  • 2
    Oh, I see the issue -- foo operator*() { ... should be C operator*() { .... Dec 3 '15 at 23:08
  • 1
    @KyleStrand: You got it! that makes totally sense now. Should the code be updated? Thanks everyone for your explanations.
    – lepe
    Dec 4 '15 at 0:44
22

too much complicated these solution, i do like that :

enum NodePosition { Primary = 0, Secondary = 1, Tertiary = 2, Quaternary = 3};

const NodePosition NodePositionVector[] = { Primary, Secondary, Tertiary, Quaternary };

for (NodePosition pos : NodePositionVector) {
...
}
8
  • I don't know why this was downvoted. It's a reasonable solution. Dec 19 '14 at 13:27
  • 14
    I expect it was because the entries need to be maintained in two places.
    – Ant
    May 29 '15 at 13:51
  • Does C++ permit the for (NodePosition pos : NodePositionVector) syntax? As far as I'm aware this is Java syntax, and you'll need iterators in C++ to do something equivalent. Dec 17 '15 at 2:17
  • 3
    @thegreatjedi Since C++11 you can, even simpier : for(auto pos : NodePositionVector) {..}
    – Enzojz
    Jan 13 '16 at 12:44
  • @thegreatjedi It would have been quicker to search, or even compile a test program, than to ask that question. But yes, since C++11 it is perfectly valid C++ syntax, which the compiler translates to the equivalent (and far more verbose/less abstracting) code, usually via iterators; see cppreference. And, as Enzojz said, C++11 also added auto, so you don't have to declare the type of the elements explicitly, unless you (A) need to use a conversion operator or (B) don't like auto for some reason. Most range-for users use auto AFAICT Sep 15 '18 at 12:42
18

If your enum starts with 0 and the increment is always 1.

enum enumType 
{ 
    A = 0,
    B,
    C,
    enumTypeEnd
};

for(int i=0; i<enumTypeEnd; i++)
{
   enumType eCurrent = (enumType) i;            
}

If not I guess the only why is to create something like a

vector<enumType> vEnums;

add the items, and use normal iterators....

1
  • The "<" operator is not available for enums.
    – Matt
    Aug 11 at 19:00
12

I often do it like that

    enum EMyEnum
    {
        E_First,
        E_Orange = E_First,
        E_Green,
        E_White,
        E_Blue,
        E_Last
    }

    for (EMyEnum i = E_First; i < E_Last; i = EMyEnum(i + 1))
    {}

or if not successive, but with regular step (e.g. bit flags)

    enum EAnimalCaps
    {
        E_None    = 0,
        E_First   = 0x1,
        E_CanFly  = E_First,
        E_CanWalk = 0x2
        E_CanSwim = 0x4,
        E_Last
    }
    
    class MyAnimal
    {
       EAnimalCaps m_Caps;
    }

    class Frog
    {
        Frog() : 
            m_Caps(EAnimalCaps(E_CanWalk | E_CanSwim))
        {}
    }

    for (EAnimalCaps= E_First; i < E_Last; i = EAnimalCaps(i << 1))
    {}
6
  • but, what's the use of printing the values bit-wise?
    – Anu
    Jan 8 '19 at 1:31
  • 1
    To use enums to create bitmasks. e.g. combine several options in single variable, then using the FOR to test for every option. Fixed my post with better example.
    – Niki
    Jan 8 '19 at 8:37
  • I still can't get the use of it(& your post still shows the old example)! Using enum as bitmasks are really helpful, but didn't able to connect the dots! could you please elaborate a bit in your example in details, you can put the additional code as well.
    – Anu
    Jan 8 '19 at 19:46
  • @anu Sorry did not see your comment. Added Frog class as bitmask example
    – Niki
    Dec 31 '19 at 12:50
  • 1
    Wouldn't you need to start at your 0x1 element? Otherwise you're bitshifting a whole lot 0s, and thereby remain at the first element indefinitely
    – Tare
    Feb 16 at 8:09
8

You can't with an enum. Maybe an enum isn't the best fit for your situation.

A common convention is to name the last enum value something like MAX and use that to control a loop using an int.

1
  • There are several examples here that demonstrate the opposite. I your own statement you are contradicting yourself (second line).
    – Niki
    Dec 31 '19 at 12:54
6

Something that hasn't been covered in the other answers = if you're using strongly typed C++11 enums, you cannot use ++ or + int on them. In that case, a bit of a messier solution is required:

enum class myenumtype {
  MYENUM_FIRST,
  MYENUM_OTHER,
  MYENUM_LAST
}

for(myenumtype myenum = myenumtype::MYENUM_FIRST;
    myenum != myenumtype::MYENUM_LAST;
    myenum = static_cast<myenumtype>(static_cast<int>(myenum) + 1)) {

  do_whatever(myenum)

}
1
  • 3
    ...but C++11 introduces the range based for that is shown in other answers. :-)
    – sage
    Mar 4 '15 at 5:52
4

You can try and define the following macro:

#define for_range(_type, _param, _A1, _B1) for (bool _ok = true; _ok;)\
for (_type _start = _A1, _finish = _B1; _ok;)\
    for (int _step = 2*(((int)_finish)>(int)_start)-1;_ok;)\
         for (_type _param = _start; _ok ; \
 (_param != _finish ? \
           _param = static_cast<_type>(((int)_param)+_step) : _ok = false))

Now you can use it:

enum Count { zero, one, two, three }; 

    for_range (Count, c, zero, three)
    {
        cout << "forward: " << c << endl;
    }

It can be used to iterate backwards and forwards through unsigned, integers, enums and chars:

for_range (unsigned, i, 10,0)
{
    cout << "backwards i: " << i << endl;
}


for_range (char, c, 'z','a')
{
    cout << c << endl;
}

Despite its awkward definition it is optimized very well. I looked at disassembler in VC++. The code is extremely efficient. Don't be put off but the three for statements: the compiler will produce only one loop after optimization! You can even define enclosed loops:

unsigned p[4][5];

for_range (Count, i, zero,three)
    for_range(unsigned int, j, 4, 0)
    {   
        p[i][j] = static_cast<unsigned>(i)+j;
    }

You obviously cannot iterate through enumerated types with gaps.

2
  • 1
    That's a wonderful hack! Although it is more appropriate for C than for C++, one might say.
    – einpoklum
    Jun 27 '13 at 11:29
  • 3
    _A1 is not an allowed name, it is a leading underscore with a following capital letter. Feb 10 '17 at 19:03
4
enum class A {
    a0=0, a3=3, a4=4
};
constexpr std::array<A, 3> ALL_A {A::a0, A::a3, A::a4}; // constexpr is important here

for(A a: ALL_A) {
  if(a==A::a0 || a==A::a4) std::cout << static_cast<int>(a);
}

A constexpr std::array can iterate even non-sequential enums without the array being instantiated by the compiler. This depends on things like the compiler's optimization heuristics and whether you take the array's address.

In my experiments, I found that g++ 9.1 with -O3 will optimize away the above array if there are 2 non-sequential values or quite a few sequential values (I tested up to 6). But it only does this if you have an if statement. (I tried a statement that compared an integer value greater than all the elements in a sequential array and it inlined the iteration despite none being excluded, but when I left out the if statement, the values were put in memory.) It also inlined 5 values from a non-sequential enum in [one case|https://godbolt.org/z/XuGtoc]. I suspect this odd behavior is due to deep heuristics having to do with caches and branch prediction.

Here is a link to a simple test iteration on godbolt that demonstrates the array does not always get instantiated.

The price of this technique is writing the enum elements twice and keeping the two lists in sync.

1
  • I like simple range-like for-loop semantics and I think it will evolve even more which is why I like this solution. Mar 24 '20 at 14:56
4

Assuming that enum is numbered sequentially is error prone. Moreover, you may want to iterate over selected enumerators only. If that subset is small, looping over it explicitly might be an elegant choice:

enum Item { Man, Wolf, Goat, Cabbage }; // or enum class

for (auto item : {Wolf, Goat, Cabbage}) { // or Item::Wolf, ...
    // ...
}
2
  • This is a nice option I think. Must be part of a newer C++ spec than I was using when I asked the question I'm guessing?
    – Adam
    Jul 15 '19 at 21:08
  • Yes. It iterates over an std::initializer_list<Item>. link.
    – marski
    Jul 22 '19 at 22:25
3

You can also overload the increment/decrement operators for your enumerated type.

3
  • 1
    You can't overload any operators on C or C++ enumerated types. Unless you were to create a struct/class that emulated an enumeration of values. Sep 1 '15 at 23:34
  • 2
    C++ allows overloading operators on enums. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2571456/… . May 9 '18 at 21:53
  • Overloading the increment/decrement requires making a decision on what to do when there is an overflow
    – Eponymous
    May 27 '19 at 18:39
3

Here's another solution which only works for contiguous enums. It gives the expected iteration, except for ugliness in the increment, which is where it belongs, since that's what's broken in C++.

enum Bar {
    One = 1,
    Two,
    Three,
    End_Bar // Marker for end of enum; 
};

for (Bar foo = One; foo < End_Bar; foo = Bar(foo + 1))
{
    // ...
}
2
  • 1
    Incrementing can be shortened to foo = Bar(foo + 1). Nov 8 '18 at 19:07
  • Thanks, HolyBlackCat, I've incorporated your excellent suggestion! I also notice that Riot has pretty much this same solution, but conformant with strong typing (and thus more verbose). Nov 8 '18 at 19:49
2

If you do not like to pollute you enum with a final COUNT item (because maybe if you also use the enum in a switch then then the compiler will warn you of a missing case COUNT:), you can do this:

enum Colour {Red, Green, Blue};
const Colour LastColour = Blue;

Colour co(0);
while (true) {
  // do stuff with co
  // ...
  if (co == LastColour) break;
  co = Colour(co+1);
}
2

There is already discussion about std::initializer_list (C++11) in the comments. I am mentioning example to iterate over the enum.

or std::initializer_list and a simpler syntax:

enum E {
    E1 = 4,
    E2 = 8,
    // ..
    En
};

constexpr std::initializer_list<E> all_E = {E1, E2, /*..*/ En};

and then

for (auto e : all_E) {
    // Do job with e
}

Reference Link

1

In Bjarne Stroustrup's C++ programming language book, you can read that he's proposing to overload the operator++ for your specific enum. enum are user-defined types and overloading operator exists in the language for these specific situations.

You'll be able to code the following:

#include <iostream>
enum class Colors{red, green, blue};
Colors& operator++(Colors &c, int)
{
     switch(c)
     {
           case Colors::red:
               return c=Colors::green;
           case Colors::green:
               return c=Colors::blue;
           case Colors::blue:
               return c=Colors::red; // managing overflow
           default:
               throw std::exception(); // or do anything else to manage the error...
     }
}

int main()
{
    Colors c = Colors::red;
    // casting in int just for convenience of output. 
    std::cout << (int)c++ << std::endl;
    std::cout << (int)c++ << std::endl;
    std::cout << (int)c++ << std::endl;
    std::cout << (int)c++ << std::endl;
    std::cout << (int)c++ << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

test code: http://cpp.sh/357gb

Mind that I'm using enum class. Code works fine with enum also. But I prefer enum class since they are strong typed and can prevent us to make mistake at compile time.

4
  • A downvote was cast on this post. Any reason why would it will not answer to the question ?
    – LAL
    Dec 13 '19 at 21:07
  • The reason is probably because this is a terrible solution architecturally speaking: it forces you to write global-meant-to logic binded to a specific component (your enumeration), moreover if your enumeration does change for whatever reason you are forced to edit your ++ operator too, as an approach it is not sustainable for any medium-large scale project, it is not a surprise it comes from a Bjarne Stroustrup's recommendation, back in the days software architecture was like science fiction
    – Manjia
    Mar 5 '20 at 11:37
  • 1
    Original question is about having operator to an enum. It wasn't a architectural question. I don't believe that in 2013 C++ was a science fiction.
    – LAL
    Mar 6 '20 at 14:03
  • I don't think people here are looking for bad solutions, which this one definitely is, and therefore downvoted. I just added my downvote too btw
    – Manjia
    Mar 3 at 11:11
0

For MS compilers:

#define inc_enum(i) ((decltype(i)) ((int)i + 1))

enum enumtype { one, two, three, count};
for(enumtype i = one; i < count; i = inc_enum(i))
{ 
    dostuff(i); 
}

Note: this is a lot less code than the simple templatized custom iterator answer.

You can get this to work with GCC by using typeof instead of decltype, but I don't have that compiler handy at the moment to make sure it compiles.

1
  • This was written ~5 years after decltype became standard C++, so you should not recommend the outdated typeof from ancient GCC. Vaguely recent GCC handles decltype just fine. There are other issues: C-style casts are discouraged, & macros worse. Proper C++ features can give the same generic functionality. This would be better rewritten to use static_cast & a template function: template <typename T> auto inc_enum(T const t) { return static_cast<T>(static cast<int>(t) + 1); }. And casts aren't needed for non-enum class. Alternatively, operators can be overloaded per enum type (TIL) Sep 15 '18 at 12:55
0

If you knew that the enum values were sequential, for example the Qt:Key enum, you could:

Qt::Key shortcut_key = Qt::Key_0;
for (int idx = 0; etc...) {
    ....
    if (shortcut_key <= Qt::Key_9) {
        fileMenu->addAction("abc", this, SLOT(onNewTab()),
                            QKeySequence(Qt::CTRL + shortcut_key));
        shortcut_key = (Qt::Key) (shortcut_key + 1);
    }
}

It works as expected.

0
typedef enum{
    first = 2,
    second = 6,
    third = 17
}MyEnum;

static const int enumItems[] = {
    first,
    second,
    third
}

static const int EnumLength = sizeof(enumItems) / sizeof(int);

for(int i = 0; i < EnumLength; i++){
    //Do something with enumItems[i]
}
2
  • This solution will create a unnecessarily static variables in memory while the objective of enum is just to create a 'mask' to constants inlined Dec 11 '19 at 19:09
  • Unless changed to constexpr static const int enumItems[] Mar 2 '20 at 0:05
0

Extending @Eponymous's answer: It's great, but doesn't provide a general syntax. Here's what I came up with:

// Common/EnumTools.h
#pragma once

#include <array>

namespace Common {

// Here we forward-declare metafunction for mapping enums to their values.
// Since C++<23 doesn't have reflection, you have to populate it yourself :-(
// Usage: After declaring enum class E, add this overload in the namespace of E:
// inline constexpr auto allValuesArray(const E&, Commob::EnumAllValuesTag) { return std::array{E::foo, E::bar}; }
// Then `AllValues<NS::E>` will call `allValuesArray(NS::E{}, EnumAllValuesTag)` which will resolve
// by ADL.
// Just be sure to keep it sync'd with your enum!

// Here's what you want to use in, e.g., loops: "for (auto val : Common::AllValues<MyEnum>) {"

struct EnumAllValuesTag {}; // So your allValuesArray function is clearly associated with this header.

template <typename Enum>
static inline constexpr auto AllValues = allValuesArray(Enum{}, EnumAllValuesTag{});
// ^ Just "constexpr auto" or "constexpr std::array<Enum, allValuesArray(Enum{}, EnumAllValuesTag{}).size()>" didn't work on all compilers I'm using, but this did.

} // namespace Common

then in your namespace:

#include "Common/EnumTools.h"

namespace MyNamespace {

enum class MyEnum {
    foo,
    bar = 4,
    baz = 42,
};

// Making this not have to be in the `Common` namespace took some thinking,
// but is a critical feature since otherwise there's no hope in keeping it sync'd with the enum.
inline constexpr auto allValuesArray(const MyEnum&, Common::EnumAllValuesTag) {
    return std::array{ MyEnum::foo, MyEnum::bar, MyEnum::baz };
}

} // namespace MyNamespace

then wherever you need to use it:

for (const auto& e : Common::AllValues<MyNamespace::MyEnum>) { ... }

so even if you've typedef'd:

namespace YourNS {
using E = MyNamespace::MyEnum;
} // namespace YourNS

for (const auto& e : Common::AllValues<YourNS::E>) { ... }

I can't think of anything much better, short of the actual language feature everyone looking at this page want.

Future work:

  1. You should be able to add a constexpr function (and so a metafunction) that filters Common::AllValues<E> to provide a Common::AllDistinctValues<E> for the case of enums with repeated numerical values like enum { foo = 0, bar = 0 };.
  2. I bet there's a way to use the compiler's switch-covers-all-enum-values to write allValuesArray such that it errors if the enum has added a value.
1
  • That's interesting. I ended up using only inline constexpr auto allValuesArray() { return std::array{ MyEnum::foo, MyEnum::bar, MyEnum::baz }; } since I need to spell it out one by one anyway. That's for me the simplest solution. (btw: with your code I saw clang-7 crashing. fun fun fun XD)
    – kwach
    Dec 8 '20 at 2:23
0

Most solution are based on loops over the (MIN, MAX) range but overlook the fact that might be holes in the enum.

My suggestions is:

        for (int i = MYTYPE_MIN; i <= MYTYPE_MAX; i++) {
            if (MYTYPE_IsValid(i)) {
                MYTYPE value = (MYTYPE)i;
                // DoStuff(value)
            }   
        }   
        
-1

Upsides: enums can have any values you like in any order you like and it's still easy to iterate over them. Names and values are defined once, in the first #define.

Downsides: if you use this at work, you need a whole paragraph to explain it to your coworkers. And, it's annoying to have to declare memory to give your loop something to iterate over, but I don't know of a workaround that doesn't confine you to enums with adjacent values (and if the enum will always have adjacent values, the enum might not be buying you all that much anyway.)

//create a, b, c, d as 0, 5, 6, 7
#define LIST x(a) x(b,=5) x(c) x(d)
#define x(n, ...) n __VA_ARGS__,
enum MyEnum {LIST}; //define the enum
#undef x //needed
#define x(n,...) n ,
MyEnum myWalkableEnum[] {LIST}; //define an iterable list of enum values
#undef x //neatness

int main()
{
  std::cout << d;
  for (auto z : myWalkableEnum)
    std::cout << z;
}
//outputs 70567

The trick of declaring a list with an undefined macro wrapper, and then defining the wrapper differently in various situations, has a lot of applications other than this one.

1
  • I don't believe this should be downvoted. It's a portable solution that works with enums that are not consecutive; and other answers involving arrays were upvoted. Mine has the advantage that you don';t have to define the enum values twice and keep two definitions in sync, and it showcases a useful trick for interpreting tokens multiple ways with undef and define that is generally applicable to many problems. Unless and until we get enum ++, -- and iterators, there's simply no clean way to do it. This is the cleanest of the workarounds.
    – Scott M
    Sep 21 at 18:50
-2

C++ doesn't have introspection, so you can't determine this kind of thing at run-time.

7
  • 1
    Could you explain to me why "introspection" would be needed to iterate over an enum? Sep 7 '16 at 18:50
  • Maybe the term is Reflection? Sep 8 '16 at 11:15
  • 2
    I'm trying to say 2 things: 1) Per many other answers C++ can accomplish this so if you're going to say it cannot, a link or further clarification is required. 2) In it's current form this is at best a comment, certainly not an answer. Sep 8 '16 at 11:33
  • Downvote my answer then - I think you've more than justified it Sep 8 '16 at 15:49
  • 1
    I'll again cram in 2 comments: 1) I don't downvote because I find that receiving a downvote demotivates site participation, I find that counterproductive 2) I still don't understand what you're trying to say but it sounds like you understand something I don't in which case I'd prefer you elaborate rather than delete a downvoted answer. Sep 8 '16 at 16:04
-3

Just make an array of ints and loop over the array, but make the last element say -1 and use it for exit condition.

If enum is:

enum MyEnumType{Hay=12,Grass=42,Beer=39};

then create array:

int Array[] = {Hay,Grass,Beer,-1};

for (int h = 0; Array[h] != -1; h++){
  doStuff( (MyEnumType) Array[h] );
}

This does not break down no matter the ints in the representation as long as -1 check does not collide with one of the elements of course.

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